Internet of Things MSc

2018-19 (also available for 2019-20)

This course is eligible for Master's loan funding. Find out more.

Start date

17 September 2018

7 January 2019

Duration

1 year full-time

Places available (subject to change)

15

Phone contact: +44 (0)1484 473116

About the course

If you are a graduate in computing or an engineering related subject and wish to pursue a career in the Internet of Things (IoT) industry, this is the course for you.

This course focuses on the rapidly expanding and challenging modern technology of Internet of Things. You will acquire knowledge across a range computing and engineering systems disciplines and develop skills in the use of cloud computing, communication systems, cyber physical systems and security.

Our modern facilities include an impressive range of professionally equipped laboratories and on campus IoT communication infrastructure. With our support you will develop an ability to critically evaluate existing and emerging IoT technology, and apply knowledge, understanding and analytical and design skills in support of technical design/development projects.

The Internet of Things technologies are shaping the future world we are going to live in. This taught masters is designed to meet the demand for a new kind of IT specialist with skills to engineer new interactive products, interconnect and embed these things into larger diverse systems and architectures, intelligently sense multi-modal data in physical and human environments and intelligently fuse and analyse the data collected.

Dr Violeta Holmes

Dr Violeta Holmes, Course Leader

Course detail

Virtual Instrumentation

This module has been designed to build on your skills in modelling, designing, processing and simulating a range of analogue and digital systems. To support you in this the module reviews the hardware and software aspects of virtual instrumentation (VI). You’ll have the opportunity to use graphical and C/C++ programming languages using PC’s and interface cards as the hardware platform. Industry standard software tools (such as LabVIEW) will also be explored to help design and simulate real systems.

Parallel Computer Architectures Cluster and Cloud Computing

Many existing and future computer-based applications impose exceptional demands on performance that traditional predominantly single-processor systems cannot offer. Large-scale computational simulations for scientific and engineering applications now routinely require highly parallel computers. In this module you will learn about Parallel Computer Architectures, Legacy and Current Parallel Computers, trends in Supercomputers and Software Issues in Parallel Computing; you will be introduced to Computer Cluster, Cloud and Grid technologies and applications. You will study the fundamental components of Cluster environments, such as Commodity Components for Clusters, Network Services/Communication software, Cluster Middleware, Resource management, and Programming Environments. The module is assessed by examination (60%) and practical assignment based on laboratory work (40%).

Computers in Control

Computers are extensively used in monitoring and controlling process plants. Many of the modern instruments contain a small computer chip called microcontroller. These computer chips are normally hidden in instruments and many other products such as mobile phones, cars, cameras, printers, toys etc. This module introduces the principle of computer chips and demonstrates how they can sense their surrounding environment by receiving signals from a variety of transducers and control the attached actuators such as lights and motors according to a specified control strategy. You will design and develop efficient ‘C’ programs in practical sessions and download them onto development boards containing many sensors and actuators. This will allow you to see your programs in action. The module is assessed by one assignment.

Effective Research and Professional Practice

This module aims to provide you with skills that are key to helping you become a successful computing researcher or practitioner. You'll get the opportunity to study topics including the nature of research, the scientific method, research methods, literature review and referencing. The module aims to cover the structure of research papers and project reports, reviewing research papers, ethical issues (including plagiarism), defining projects, project management, writing project reports and making presentations.

Individual Project

This module enables you to work independently on a project related to a self-selected problem. A key feature in this final stage of the course is that you will be encouraged to undertake an in-company project with an external Client. Where appropriate, however, the Project may be undertaken with an internal Client - research-active staff - on larger research and knowledge transfer projects. The Project is intended to be integrative, a culmination of knowledge, skills, competencies and experiences acquired in other modules, coupled with further development of these assets. In the case where an external client is involved, both the Client and Student will be required to sign a learning agreement that clearly outlines scope, responsibilities and ownership of the project and its products or other deliverables. The Project will be student-driven, with the clear onus on you to negotiate agreement, and communicate effectively, with all parties involved at each stage of the Project.

Advanced Technical Project

The project provides the opportunity to undertake a major programme of advanced independent work. It requires you to investigate a chosen topic and achieve specified technical goals through good planning and the application of analytical, problem-solving and design skills. The project is developed in collaboration with either an industrial company or within one of the research groups in the School. Your supervising tutor will monitor progress and provide guidance in various aspects of the project including preparation of the final report.

Entry requirements

Entry requirements for this course are normally:

  • An Honours degree (2:2 or above) in electronic engineering, computing or related disciplines or an equivalent professional qualification.

  • If your first language is not English, you will need to meet the minimum requirements of an English Language qualification. The minimum of IELTS 6.0 overall with no element lower than 5.5, or equivalent will be considered acceptable.

  • Other qualifications and/or experience that demonstrate appropriate knowledge and skills at Honours degree standard may also be acceptable.

Teaching excellence

Research plays an important role in informing all our teaching and learning activities. Through research our staff remain up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, which means you develop knowledge and skills that are current and highly relevant.

For more information see the Research section of our website.

Enhance your career


A postgraduate qualification is a great way to stand out from your colleagues and position yourself for a promotion or pursue a career change.  In fact, here at Huddersfield, 90% of our postgraduate students go on to work in professional or managerial roles.*

* DHLE survey 2014/15

* Source: DHLE – Destination of Leavers of Higher Education 2014/15

90%

Student support

At the University of Huddersfield, you'll find support networks and services to help you get ahead in your studies and social life. Whether you study at undergraduate or postgraduate level, you'll soon discover that you're never far away from our dedicated staff and resources to help you to navigate through your personal student journey. Find out more about all our support services.

Important information

We will always try to deliver your course as described on this web page. However, sometimes we may have to make changes as set out below.

We review all optional modules each year and change them to reflect the expertise of our staff, current trends in research and as a result of student feedback. We will always ensure that you have a range of options to choose from and we will let students know in good time the options available for them to choose for the following year.

We will only change core modules for a course if it is necessary for us to do so, for example to maintain course accreditation. We will let you know about any such changes as soon as possible, usually before you begin the relevant academic year.

Sometimes we have to make changes to other aspects of a course or how it is delivered. We only make these changes if they are for reasons outside of our control, or where they are for our students’ benefit. Again, we will let you know about any such changes as soon as possible, usually before the relevant academic year. Our regulations set out our procedure which we will follow when we need to make any such changes.

When you enrol as a student of the University, your study and time with us will be governed by a framework of regulations, policies and procedures, which form the basis of your agreement with us. These include regulations regarding the assessment of your course, academic integrity, your conduct (including attendance) and disciplinary procedure, fees and finance and compliance with visa requirements (where relevant). It is important that you familiarise yourself with these as you will be asked to agree to abide by them when you join us as a student. You will find a guide to the key terms here, where you will also find links to the full text of each of the regulations, policies and procedures referred to.

The Higher Education Funding Council for England is the principal regulator for the University.