Computing Science BSc(Hons)

2018-19 (also available for 2017-18)

Software engineering, programming, mathematics, mobile computing – we look at a range of topics to help you develop your computing knowledge and skills.

Start date

17 September 2018

Duration

3 years full-time
4 years inc. placement year

Entry requirements

A Level - BBB

See full entry requirements

UCAS Code

G400

Places available (subject to change)

40

Phone contact: +44 (0)1484 473116

About the course

From sending a text to using the cashpoint, every day we all interact with computers in all sorts of different ways. Computing helps us have more fun, get creative and try out new ideas. It enhances our quality of life and aims to meet the challenges that ongoing advances in technology create. This course helps you build up knowledge and the skills that could be invaluable in the computing industry.

In this course, we aim to help you explore a range of topics, like programming, software engineering, mathematics and mobile computing. We'll look at the theory and the practical side of things to help you develop your abilities. It could make all the difference when you go on to look for employment in this rapidly expanding industry.

Your tutors will encourage you to identify tough problems, and then work out how to solve them through software. You might get involved in developing software solutions using the latest artificial intelligence (AI). Or perhaps you’ll look at how to use computing applications in engineering or scientific experiments.

In Year 1 you’ll follow a core computing programme aimed at giving you a broad understanding. Then from Year 2 on you’ll have the chance to take an option module in each year, this and project based work will help you to tailor your studies according to what interests you the most.

During your studies you’ll be taught through a combination of formal lectures, tutorial groups, practical laboratory work and seminars. The course is partially accredited by the British Computing Society (BCS) and gives you the chance to apply your skills in the real-world with an optional one-year placement. Previous students have taken placements at companies like IBM, Microsoft, Hewlett Packard, HBOS and British Airways.

You might like to hear what Joseph has to say about studying at the University of Huddersfield.

There is a great relationship between the staff and students at Huddersfield, and the students are all so motivated. Our courses give you an insight into research and professional, practical experiences, so you'll be supported to get the best of both worlds.

Wolfgang Faber

Professor Wolfgang Faber, Professor of Artificial Intelligence

Placements


This course offers you the chance to undertake an optional placement in Year 3. This opportunity helps you to build on the knowledge and skills developed on the course. You will be employed by the company for 12 months, but the actual number of weeks worked will be dependent on the annual leave entitlement you are given in line with the placement company’s policy.

The placement year is a valuable tool that can enhance your employability and help you to develop as an individual. It is acknowledged that graduates with industry experience are generally much more attractive to employers.

Our Placement Unit will be on hand to support you in finding suitable placement opportunities. They will assist you with preparing your CV and with interview techniques. They'll also be in contact with you during your placement so that you'll be fully supported while you gain the experience that employers value so highly.

The Placement Unit team are regularly in contact with local and national companies. Previous students have spent their placement year at companies including IBM, Microsoft, Hewlett Packard, HBOS and British Airways as well as smaller companies from the local economy and further afield, including placements in eg Belgium, Italy and the United States.

Our international software business headquartered in the UK has been employing Huddersfield graduates for the last 10 years. They have been of a consistently high standard across all disciplines and we will continue to recruit from Huddersfield.

Maria Sarkar

Maria Sarkar, Vice President, DriveWorks Ltd

Entry requirements

BBBat A Level

120 UCAS tariff points from a combination of Level 3 qualifications

  • DMM from a BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma.
  • Pass Access to Higher Education Diploma in a subject that is relevant to the course with 45 Level 3 credits at Merit or above.
  • 120 UCAS tariff points from International Baccalaureate qualifications.

In addition you must have GCSE English at grade 4 or above and Maths at grade 5 or above, or grade C and B respectively if awarded under the previous GCSE grading scheme.

Other suitable experience or qualifications will be considered. For further information please see the University's minimum entry requirements.

Come along to our Open Day


We offer a range of courses in the area of Computing. Hear our staff and students talk to you about our courses, the facilities on campus and the placement year opportunities. Book on an Open Day to find out more.

Course Detail

Core modules:

Software Design and Development

This module aims to provide you with an introduction to the design, development, and testing of large scale software systems. The material covered includes introductory programming (in a language such as Java), program testing (using JUnit testing techniques), systems modelling (using unified modelling language- UML), graphical user interface (GUI) development, and rapid prototyping techniques.

Computing Science and Mathematics

In this module we introduce you to basic computing science and mathematical concepts related to software development. Topics covered include set theory, graphs and trees, finite state machines, grammars and languages, propositional logic and searching and sorting algorithms. You’ll put the theory into practice using a programming language, such as Java, and software that lets you directly implement finite state machines.

Hardware and Networks

This module explores how computers and networks function by introducing you to their components and structures, from the basic building blocks to fully functioning systems. The module covers how computers execute programs, how data is stored, recognised and manipulated, and which hardware and software components are used to achieve this. You’ll also get the opportunity to study how networks are constructed and what techniques (eg cryptography, routing and error detection and correction) are used to ensure that data is transmitted correctly and securely through them.

Studio 1

This module is studio based and takes a very practical approach to the work covered. You’ll be offered the opportunity to produce a prototype related to your chosen study path. Through this project based approach you’ll be introduced to the concepts and principles of programming/scripting using an object-based language. You'll be required to plan, design, implement, test and deploy solutions in response to a requirement specification. Ultimately you’re expected to produce a useful software product, whether it is a game, entertainment feature or business or media product. Throughout this module you’ll be supported in acquiring sound development and problem solving skills and be expected to assemble a portfolio of work.

Project 1

Working as part of a team, this module aims to provide you with an understanding of hardware, software and industry best practices used by businesses. In your teams you’ll be supported in planning, designing and developing a prototype product. This experience has been designed to introduce you to the product development cycle, technology limitations and possible future developments.

You’ll be supported in developing the theoretical and practical knowledge needed to recognise challenges that occur in Computer Science, and to provide solutions. These can range from software solutions implementing the latest in artificial intelligence (AI), to the exploitation of computing applications for engineering or scientific experimentation.

You’ll be taught through a combination of lectures, tutorials and practical sessions and 19.67% of the study time on this course is spent in lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical sessions etc. The course emphasis is on the development of sound practical skills, alongside an understanding of theory.

Assessment is varied and includes coursework, log books, presentations and demonstrations, as well as formal examinations. There are opportunities for group working, in addition to individual assessments.

We have varied and experienced teaching staff including internationally recognised researchers as well as staff with many years of industrial experience.

Your module specification/course handbook will provide full details of the assessment criteria applying to your course.

Feedback (usually written) is normally provided on all coursework submissions within three term time weeks – unless the submission was made towards the end of the session in which case feedback would be available on request after the formal publication of results. Feedback on exam performance/final coursework is available on request after the publication of results.

Further information

The teaching year normally starts in September with breaks at Christmas and Easter, finishing with a main examination/assessment period around May/June. Timetables are normally available one month before registration. As this is a full-time course, you may have to attend every day of the week.

Your course is made up of modules and each module is worth a number of credits. Each year you study modules to the value of 120 credits, adding up to 360 credits in total for a bachelor’s qualification. These credits can come from a combination of core, compulsory and optional modules but please note that optional modules may not run if we do not have enough students interested.

If you achieve 120 credits for the current stage you are at, you may progress to the next stage of your course, subject to any professional, statutory or regulatory body guidelines.

 

 

 

Teaching excellence

  1. Huddersfield is a TEF gold-rated institution delivering consistently outstanding teaching and learning of the highest quality found in the UK (Teaching Excellence Framework, 2017).
  2. We won the first Global Teaching Excellence Award recognising the University’s commitment to world-class teaching and its success in developing students as independent learners and critical thinkers (HEA, 2017).
  3. Here at Huddersfield, you’ll be taught by some of the best lecturers in the country. The University is number one in England for the proportion of staff with teaching qualifications (HEFCE, 2016).
  4. For the past ten years, we’ve been the UK’s leading university for National Teaching Fellowships too, which rate Britain’s best lecturers. It’s all part of our ongoing drive for teaching excellence, which helps our students to achieve great things too.
  5. We’re unique in the fact that all our permanent teaching staff* have, or are completing, doctorates. This expertise, together with our teaching credentials, means that students here learn from knowledgeable and well-qualified teachers and academics who are at the forefront of their subject area.

*Permanent staff, after probation: some recently appointed colleagues will only obtain recognition in the months after their arrival in Huddersfield, once they have started teaching; research degrees applies to those on contracts of more than half-time.

Gallery

Your career


90% of our graduates from this course go on to work and/or further study within six months of graduating (DLHE Survey 2014/15).

90%Graduates employed

Student support

At the University of Huddersfield, you'll find support networks and services to help you get ahead in your studies and social life. Whether you study at undergraduate or postgraduate level, you'll soon discover that you're never far away from our dedicated staff and resources to help you to navigate through your personal student journey. Find out more about all our support services.

Important information

We will always try to deliver your course as described on this web page. However, sometimes we may have to make changes as set out below.

We review all optional modules each year and change them to reflect the expertise of our staff, current trends in research and as a result of student feedback. We will always ensure that you have a range of options to choose from and we will let students know in good time the options available for them to choose for the following year.

We will only change core modules for a course if it is necessary for us to do so, for example to maintain course accreditation. We will let you know about any such changes as soon as possible, usually before you begin the relevant academic year.

Sometimes we have to make changes to other aspects of a course or how it is delivered. We only make these changes if they are for reasons outside of our control, or where they are for our students’ benefit. Again, we will let you know about any such changes as soon as possible, usually before the relevant academic year. Our regulations set out our procedure which we will follow when we need to make any such changes.

When you enrol as a student of the University, your study and time with us will be governed by a framework of regulations, policies and procedures, which form the basis of your agreement with us. These include regulations regarding the assessment of your course, academic integrity, your conduct (including attendance) and disciplinary procedure, fees and finance and compliance with visa requirements (where relevant). It is important that you familiarise yourself with these as you will be asked to agree to abide by them when you join us as a student. You will find a guide to the key terms here, where you will also find links to the full text of each of the regulations, policies and procedures referred to.

The Higher Education Funding Council for England is the principal regulator for the University.

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