Criminology/Criminal Justice (PhD)

2018-19 (also available for 2017-18)

Our innovative research and strong partnerships mean you will join a thriving research community addressing issues such as transport and environment crime, alcohol violence, recidivism, policing and crime prevention, amongst others.

Start date

17 September 2018

7 January 2019

29 April 2019

Duration

The maximum duration for a part-time PhD is 6 years (72 months) with an optional submission pending (writing up period) of 12 months.

If studying on a part-time basis, you must establish close links with the University and spend normally not less than an average of 10 working days per year in the university, excluding participation in activities associated with enrolment, re-registration and progression monitoring. You are also expected to dedicate 17.5 hours per week to the research.

Sometimes it may be possible to mix periods of both full-time and part-time study.

Places available (subject to change)

This is dependent upon supervisory capacity within the subject area

Phone contact: +44 (0)1484 473969

The research degree

A PhD is the highest academic award for which a student can be registered. This programme allows you to explore and pursue a research project built around a substantial piece of work, which has to show evidence of original contribution to knowledge.

A part time PhD is a six year programme of research and culminates in the production of a large-scale piece of written work in the form of a research thesis that should not normally exceed 80,000 to 100,000 words.

Completing a PhD can give you a great sense of personal achievement and help you develop a high level of transferable skills which will be useful in your subsequent career, as well as contributing to the development of knowledge in your chosen field.

You are expected to work to an approved programme of work including appropriate programmes of postgraduate study (which may be drawn from parts of existing postgraduate courses, final year degree programmes, conferences, seminars, masterclasses, guided reading or a combination of study methods).

You will be appointed a main supervisor who will normally be part of a supervisory team, comprising up to three members to advise and support you on your project.

Entry requirements

The normal level of attainment required for entry is:

  • a Master's degree from a UK University or equivalent, in a discipline appropriate to the proposed programme to be followed, or
  • an upper second class honours degree (2:1) from a UK university in a discipline appropriate to that of the proposed programme to be followed, or
  • appropriate research or professional experience at postgraduate level, which has resulted in published work, written reports or other appropriate evidence of accomplishment.

For applicants whose first language or language of instruction is not English you will need to meet the minimum requirements of an English Language qualification. The minimum of IELTS 6.5 overall with no element lower than 6.0, will be considered acceptable, or equivalent.

Further information on international entry requirements and English language entry requirements is available on our international webpages.

Why choose Huddersfield?


There are many reasons to choose the University of Huddersfield and here are just five of them:

  1. We were named University of the Year by Times Higher Education in 2013.
  2. Huddersfield is the only University where 100% of permanent teaching staff are Fellows of the Higher Education Authority.
  3. Our courses have been accredited by 41 professional bodies.
  4. 94.6% of our postgraduate students go on to work and/or further study within six months of graduating.
  5. We have world-leading applied research groups in Biomedical Sciences, Engineering and Physical Sciences, Social Sciences and Arts and Humanities.

What can I research?

There are several research topics available for this degree. See below for full details of individual research areas including an outline of the topics, the supervisor, funding information and eligibility criteria:

Outline

Progress has been made in incentivising security as a design consideration within housing. Yet questions still arise regarding the impact of security upon aesthetics and design quality – can secure housing be attractive housing? This research seeks to explore the extent to which security and aesthetics can be aligned or whether there are inevitable conflicts between the two.

Funding

Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available

Deadline

Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

CoSA is a particularly socially inclusive way of working with sex offenders in the community to support them to desist from crime and not reoffend. Proposals on how this and similar approaches can be broadened in scope or developed into new ways of protecting the public, especially whilst avoiding marginalisation and social exclusion, would be welcomed.

Funding

Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available

Deadline

Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

This research topic attempts to use simulation and other computer tools (agent based modelling, serious gaming, for example) to develop new methods for implementing crime prevention interventions. This could be for a range of potential users such as young people and school children, university students, or even professionals working in crime prevention.

Funding

Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available

Deadline

Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

To examine the relationship between perceptions of and experiences of crime and the decision to move house. The study will examine the relationship from the perspective of individual residents/households and at the area level. The research would be informed by the theory and practice of Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED) and would explore whether high levels of residential turnover interrupt the operation of informal social control mechanisms such as guardianship and natural surveillance.

Funding

Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available

Deadline

Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Crime is known to be concentrated and clustered at particular places (Eck and Weisburd, 1984; Weisburd, 2015). This research aims to explore these patterns in more detail, to explore factors behind this, including: local context; police patrols; day to day urban movement and routines; underlying land-use; place management; and changes to everyday spaces - to better understand spatio-temporal patterns of crime concentrations. A range of new and novel data exists that could be used to explore the dynamics of urban settings, such as big data, social media, google street view, aerial photography. The purpose of this study is to explore how the routine movement of everyday life influences patterns of crime.

Funding

Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available

Deadline

Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Public transport users enter a system which constrains their movement. They have little control over who gets on and off carriages they travel on. They may travel through unfamiliar places. At times systems are congested, at others very isolated. . They may travel for work, leisure, as tourists, or for other purposes, alone or in groups.

This research explores perceptions of crime and fears of personal security on public transport from the user perspective. Moreover, it attempts to examine whether current crime prevention interventions actually make the users of public transport feel safer, and explores how transport organisations can offer better reassurance to different passenger groups. This is especially important as many users of public transport are young persons, the elderly, those with disabilities, and ethnic minorities – who are often more reliant on public transport and also more fearful of travel.

Funding

Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available

Deadline

Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED) is an approach to crime reduction that aims to reduce crime by influencing the design, build and management of the built, and sometimes natural, environment. Research has shown that this approach can be effective in reducing acquisitive crimes such as burglary and vehicle crime. However, there is little evidence to explore its impact upon anti-social behaviour.

Funding

Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available

Deadline

Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Research suggests that physical security measures reduce burglary and that offenders are deterred by the threat of surveillance, occupancy and limited escape routes. However, interviews with burglars (Armitage, 2017) throws doubt on the effectiveness of burglar alarms – with burglars stating that they are not deterred by their presence. Through interviews with prolific burglars, this research seeks to explore burglar perceptions of this crime prevention measure.

Funding

Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available

Deadline

Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Progress has been made in incentivising and requiring social housing providers to build properties to security standards – specifically in requiring social housing to meet Secured by Design standards. Less progress has been made within the private sector and housing developers have inferred that this reluctance relates to a property being labelled as ‘secure’ deterring potential house buyers (for fear that secure equates to high crime). This research aims to explore the importance of security in house buyers’ decision making.

Funding

Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available

Deadline

Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Crimes committed by, against and within immigrant communities; immigrant concentration and its impact on crime; relationships between immigrant communities and native populations.

Funding

Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available

Deadline

Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Much has been made of the need for a “what works” for reducing crime. Examples include the growing interest in evidence based policing, and the College of Police crime reduction toolkit. This study aims to explore how evidence based knowledge can actually be translated into action by criminal justice agencies. This includes consideration of police training, knowledge transfer, and how best to encourage police teaching and learning. It also questions what constitutes evidence, and what best practice actually means.

Funding

Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available

Deadline

Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Although investigative guidance is available for UK police conducting ‘live’ investigations, it is not currently for those deemed cold or historic cases. It is assumed therefore that investigative decision making is generic and that the same cognitive bias exists. Ongoing research suggests that this is not the case and research is required to explore this further.

Funding

Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available

Deadline

Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Nudge psychology is becoming an increasingly popular approach to reducing various different crime related problems. Further research is needed to examine how it might be applied to other areas of crime reduction.

Funding

Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available

Deadline

Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Investigations of long term crime and victimisation patterns, changes in incidence concentration and seriousness across large cohorts.

Funding

Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available

Deadline

Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

To examine criminal justice or social processes, policy and practice which support or hinder the desistance and/or reintegration of sex offenders or other high risk offenders within or through prison and into the community. Proposals may focus on specific aspects of criminal justice work or society, including, but not limited to, the work of resettlement prisons, MAPPA, probation approved premises, the transition from prison to the community, employment and education opportunities, housing and accommodation, social stigma and exclusion, individual or social desistance processes.

Funding

Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available

Deadline

Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Increasingly we are aware of how important the peer networks of offenders or potential offenders are in forming their criminal (individual and social) identity, and so influencing their criminal career or desistance process. Proposals are welcomed that seek to explore the role and impact of social networks, be they in the virtual or real world domains. Of particular interest are sex offender online networks and ‘sexual ageplay’ groups, though innovative proposals in related areas are also encouraged.

Funding

Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available

Deadline

Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

A growth area in penological research is the study of the unintended impacts of imprisonment on prisoners themselves, as well as on their family and wider social networks. Proposals may focus on the prisoner, in terms of issues relating to the pains of imprisonment or prisoner adaptions and adjustments. For example, the impact of imprisonment on healthy ageing for older prisoners. Alternatively, proposals may focus on the family or social networks, perhaps considering the inter-relations with the prisoner, or the particular impacts on those outside of prison, their support needs and service provision.

Funding

Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available

Deadline

Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Crime has been falling since the 1990s, yet none of the causes suggested so far explain a significant proportion of the drop. Students looking to further expand the research on the topic in quantitative manner are welcome.

Funding

Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available

Deadline

Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

This project would examine what emphasis urban designers place on considering crime prevention in the design of new developments. It would explore how urban designers engage with the police in the design of new developments and what they perceive to be synergises and conflicts between the urban design and crime prevention agendas.

Funding

Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available

Deadline

Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Determining what the utility is of forensic evidence in criminal investigations and in court.

Funding

Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available

Deadline

Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

In the past ten years the scientific basis of forensic science has been challenged, its reliability and validity in court contested and commercialisation of forensic provision introduced in England and Wales. In light of this there is the need for increased research into establishing a sound body of knowledge for forensic science, which supports the requirements of its end-users. This requires an exploration into the applicability and reliability of forensic research.

Funding

Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available

Deadline

Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Organisational factors may have a key role in the perceptions of safety of workers in risky environments. A workplace’s safety climate can be defined as the degree of commitment to safety demonstrated by the different levels in the organisation including senior-management, supervisors and workers. This study will explore the extent to which management policies and practices around violence prevention influence safety outcomes and the perception of safety in occupations where staff are exposed to the risk of violence.

Funding

Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available

Deadline

Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Applications are welcome for a diverse range of specialist topics and areas of expertise; including reducing burglary, tackling hate crime, exploring the mental health of children of prisoners, preventing violent extremism, violence and the night time economy and the impact of design on levels of crime, among others.

We would especially welcome applications for topics in which the proposed research is in line with the research priorities of the School of Human and Health Sciences.

To find out more about the research we conduct, take a look at our Research, Innovation and Skills webpages, where you will find information on each research area. To find out about our staff visit ‘Our experts’ which features profiles of all our academic staff.

Further information

The teaching year normally starts in September with breaks at Christmas and Easter, finishing with a main examination/assessment period around May/June. Timetables are normally available one month before registration. You can study this course on a part-time basis but, as this is a full-time course, you may have to attend every day of the week.

Your course is made up of modules and each module is worth a number of credits. Each year you study modules to the value of 120 credits, adding up to 360 credits in total for a bachelor’s qualification. These credits can come from a combination of core, compulsory and optional modules but please note that optional modules may not run if we do not have enough students interested.

If you achieve 120 credits for the current stage you are at, you may progress to the next stage of your course, subject to any professional, statutory or regulatory body guidelines.

Research community

The University of Huddersfield has a thriving research community made up of over 1,350 postgraduate research students. We have students studying on a part-time and full-time basis from all over the world with around 43% from overseas and 57% from the UK.

Research plays an important role in informing all our teaching and learning activities. Through undertaking research our staff remain up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, which means you develop knowledge and skills which are current and relevant to your specialist area.

Find out more about our research staff and centres

Research support

The University of Huddersfield has an exciting and comprehensive Researcher Skills Development Programme available to all postgraduate researchers. The Researcher Skills Development Programme supports our researchers to broaden their knowledge, allowing them to access tools and skills which can significantly improve employability, whether in academia or industry. It’s important to develop transferable personal and professional skills alongside the research skills and techniques necessary for your postgraduate study and research. The programme is also mapped onto Vitae’s Researcher Development Framework (RDF), allowing researchers at the University of Huddersfield to benefit from Vitae support as well as our own Programme.

We offer skills training through a programme designed to take advantage of technology platforms as well as face-to-face workshops and courses. The University has subscribed to Epigeum, a programme of on-line research training support designed and managed by staff at Imperial College London which will be accessed via UniLearn, the University’s Virtual Learning Environment.

Student support

At the University of Huddersfield, you'll find support networks and services to help you get ahead in your studies and social life. Whether you study at undergraduate or postgraduate level, you'll soon discover that you're never far away from our dedicated staff and resources to help you to navigate through your personal student journey. Find out more about all our support services.

Important information

We will always try to deliver your course as described on this web page. However, sometimes we may have to make changes to aspects of a course or how it is delivered. We only make these changes if they are for reasons outside of our control, or where they are for our students' benefit. We will let you know about any such changes as soon as possible. Our regulations set out our procedure which we will follow when we need to make any such changes.

When you enrol as a student of the University, your study and time with us will be governed by a framework of regulations, policies and procedures, which form the basis of your agreement with us. These include regulations regarding the assessment of your course, academic integrity, your conduct (including attendance) and disciplinary procedure, fees and finance and compliance with visa requirements (where relevant). It is important that you familiarise yourself with these as you will be asked to agree to abide by them when you join us as a student. You will find a guide to the key terms here, where you will also find links to the full text of each of the regulations, policies and procedures referred to.

The Higher Education Funding Council for England is the principal regulator for the University.

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