Public Health (PhD)

2019-20 (also available for 2020-21)

This course is eligible for Doctoral loan funding. Find out more.

Start date

16 September 2019

6 January 2020

27 April 2020

Duration

The maximum duration for a full-time PhD is 3 years (36 months) with an optional submission pending (writing up period) of 12 months.

Sometimes it may be possible to mix periods of both full-time and part-time study.

Application deadlines

For PGR start date January 2020

29 November 2019

For PGR start date April 2020

11 February 2020

For PGR start date September 2020

02 July 2020

About the research degree

A PhD is the highest academic award for which a student can be registered. This programme allows you to explore and pursue a research project built around a substantial piece of work, which has to show evidence of original contribution to knowledge.

A full time PhD is a three year programme of research and culminates in the production of a large-scale piece of written work in the form of a research thesis that should not normally exceed 80,000 to 100,000 words.

Completing a PhD can give you a great sense of personal achievement and help you develop a high level of transferable skills which will be useful in your subsequent career, as well as contributing to the development of knowledge in your chosen field.

You are expected to work to an approved programme of work including appropriate programmes of postgraduate study (which may be drawn from parts of existing postgraduate courses, final year degree programmes, conferences, seminars, masterclasses, guided reading or a combination of study methods).

You will be appointed a main supervisor who will normally be part of a supervisory team, comprising up to three members to advise and support you on your project.

Entry requirements

The normal level of attainment required for consideration for entry is:

  • a Master's degree from a UK University or equivalent, in a discipline appropriate to the proposed programme to be followed, or
  • an upper second class honours degree (2:1) from a UK university in a discipline appropriate to that of the proposed programme to be followed, or
  • appropriate research or professional experience at postgraduate level, which has resulted in published work, written reports or other appropriate evidence of accomplishment.

If your first language is not English, you will need to meet the minimum requirements of an English Language qualification. The minimum for IELTS is 6.5 overall with no element lower than 6.0, or equivalent will be considered acceptable. Read more about the University’s entry requirements for students outside of the UK on our Where are you from information pages.

What can I research?

There are several research topics available for this degree. See below examples of research areas including an outline of the topics, the supervisor, funding information and eligibility criteria:

Outline

To explore demedicalised approaches to common health problems. Common health problems, characterised by strong psychosocial associations, are not well explained by a biomedical model. Some clinical approaches can have iatrogenic effects. Patient education and activity promotion may be effective, yet are underexplored.

Funding

Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available

Deadline

Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

To explore patient-centred outcomes from treatment. Many of the usual treatments for common health problems have been found relatively ineffective in clinical trials, yet patients often report satisfaction with treatment and with the practitioner treating them. Perhaps patients derive benefits not covered by usual clinical outcomes; rather they may derive both health and social benefits from (effective) clinical encounters such as better understanding, coping skills and social support – this may be important to the individual and society, and could influence future management options.

Funding

Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available

Deadline

Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Ankle muscle strength is an important factor in mobility, predicting injury and athletic performance and is also associated with increased risk of falls. A greater understanding of the determinants of ankle muscle strength would benefit all of these areas.

Funding

Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available

Deadline

Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Research into existential therapy is relatively limited and issues such as the relationship between theory and practice and the effectiveness of the approach would benefit from further investigation. This project would focus on the above or related aspects of existential therapy.

Funding

Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available

Deadline

Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

• The relationship of the menstrual cycle and musculoskeletal injury • Group diversity and the teaching and learning experience in Higher Education • Promoting Public Health • Musculoskeletal conditions • Physiotherapy-related subjects. Promoting exercise for health

Funding

Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available

Deadline

Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

To explore novel rehabilitation approaches based on psychosocial principles. Traditional rehabilitation and vocational rehabilitation are expensive interventions that tend to be focused more on clinical outcomes than on participatory outcomes. Adding (or replacing) traditional rehabilitation programmes with psychosocial interventions based on overcoming obstacles to participation offer an alternative, but are under-explored.

Funding

Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available

Deadline

Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

To explore novel approaches to helping people return to work after illness. Work is generally good for our health and wellbeing, and work participation is generally therapeutic and preferable to long periods of sick leave. Beliefs and attitudes across society influence the decision whether to stay at work in the face of symptoms: myths abound. Getting all the players (worker, employer, healthcare and social contacts) onside and acting in a facilitative manner is fundamental to stay-at-work strategies, but how to achieve it remains problematic. Case management approaches are promising, but currently suboptimal.

Funding

Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available

Deadline

Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

The research would involve measuring skin perfusion and oxygen levels around skin graft and wound sites in patients who have undergone plastic surgery. Skin perfusion and TCP02 levels would be measured at regular intervals to identify wound progression. This would allow for early prediction of those wounds that may fail to heal in a timely manner.

Funding

Please see our scholarships page at https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/scholarships to find out about funding or studentship options available

Deadline

Please see details via the following web page https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Applications are welcome for a diverse range of specialist topics and areas of expertise. We would especially welcome applications for topics in which the proposed research is in line with the research priorities of the School of Human and Health Sciences.

To find out more about the research we conduct, take a look at our Research, Innovation and Skills webpages, where you will find information on each research area. To find out about our staff visit ‘Our experts’ which features profiles of all our academic staff.

Researcher Enviroment

The University of Huddersfield has a thriving research community made up of over 1,350 postgraduate research students. We have students studying on a part-time and full-time basis from all over the world with around 43% from overseas and 57% from the UK.

Research plays an important role in informing all our teaching and learning activities. Through undertaking research our staff remain up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, which means you develop knowledge and skills which are current and relevant to your specialist area.

Find out more about our research staff and centres

Student support

At the University of Huddersfield, you'll find support networks and services to help you get ahead in your studies and social life. Whether you study at undergraduate or postgraduate level, you'll soon discover that you're never far away from our dedicated staff and resources to help you to navigate through your personal student journey. Find out more about all our support services.

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