Social Research and Evaluation MSc (Distance Learning)

2019-20 (also available for 2018-19)

Start date

17 September 2018

Duration

1 year full-time (distance learning)
Also available 3 years part-time

Places available (subject to change)

30

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About the course

The course operates within a multi-disciplinary framework to provide rigorous practical and applied training in social research methods. You will undertake a critical study of research methods and data analysis appropriate to social research.

The course is designed to meet the postgraduate training requirements of the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). This course may also meet your training needs if you are undertaking doctoral research related to social science, appraising research, undertaking workplace research or commissioning research in a wide range of professions including health, education and criminal justice.

This is a distance learning course where University attendance is not required. It will provide you with the opportunity to enhance your skills and gain a degree from anywhere in the world. You will be taught through a variety of online teaching methods including video, interactive webinars, online demonstrations and tutorials. You will receive teaching and support from experienced and active researchers who are acknowledged experts in their fields.

Course Detail

Dissertation (SRE) (Distance Learning)

Through this module you will be expected to undertake the design, data collection, data analysis and write up for a piece of empirical research on a topic of your own choice, subject to approval by your supervisor. Your supervisor will guide you through the stages of the project and have regular contact with you. You will be assessed through one piece of coursework in the form of a dissertation, this will report, to a professional standard, the work you have undertaken and the results you have obtained.

Evaluation and Reviews (Distance Learning)

You will be introduced to the nature of evaluation research as an approach that uses standard research methods techniques but in a specific context. This may enable you to examine the various models of, and approaches to evaluation. You will also have the opportunity to become familiar with the requirements of systematic reviews of the literature. The module will be assessed through one piece of coursework: either a proposal for an evaluation or a systematic review in an area relevant to your personal and/or professional concerns. An outline of this will be delivered as a presentation, on which you will be given feedback.

Introduction to Qualitative and Quantitative Data Analysis (Distance Learning)

This module introduces you to the basic methods used to analyse qualitative and quantitative data. You will be encouraged to examine the range of qualitative data and how you can prepare it for analysis. You will have the opportunity to study two key qualitative analytic techniques: thematic analysis and discourse analysis. In the case of quantitative data analysis you will be introduced to the basic use of statistics, both descriptive and inferential, using SPSS, a computer package. You will be assessed through two pieces of coursework, which will involve writing up the analysis of a given data set, one qualitative and one quantitative.

Social Research Methods (Distance Learning)

You will be introduced to the design of social research and examine the approaches used to collect social research data. You will have the opportunity to explore issues that affect the quality of research and the three design strategies: experiment, survey and case study. You will also be encouraged to study key techniques including questionnaire design, interviewing, ethnography and the use of documents. The module will be assessed through coursework, where you will assemble a critique of the research methods used in a provided journal article.

Teaching and Assessment

This course provides the opportunity for you to learn through a combination of videos and other learning resources, webinars, online demonstrations and tutorials. Videos and other learning resources offer a guide to the key literature, concepts, theories and research studies. Webinars, running on an interactive basis will facilitate the use of case studies and problem-solving exercises, as well as offering a mixed and more varied means of communication between you, other students and the teaching staff. Online demonstrations and tutorials demonstrate key analytic activities and software use (especially NVivo and SPSS). You will be offered individualised support in these activities.

A typical learning session may involve reading some set text, watching some video footage and possibly undertaking an online test. This may be followed by an online webinar session where you and other students will have the opportunity to discuss what you have read and watched, ask questions of the tutor, and practice and receive feedback on some of the techniques you have learnt.

You will not be required to undertake any examinations, as you will be continually assessed throughout the course. Most of your assessment will be practically based, where you will practice the data collection and data analysis techniques you have learnt and present your results in a research report format to professional standards. In a few cases you may be required to produce critical essays and undertake presentations.

Your module specification/course handbook will provide full details of the assessment criteria applying to your course.

Feedback (usually written) is normally provided on all coursework submissions within three term time weeks – unless the submission was made towards the end of the session in which case feedback would be available on request after the formal publication of results. Feedback on exam performance/final coursework is available on request after the publication of results.

Entry requirements

Entry requirements for this course are normally one of the following:

  • An Honours degree at 2:1 or above, where at least half of the module credits covered one or more social science disciplines.
  • Substantial relevant work experience where you have undertaken empirical social research or management experience, such as leading research projects and commissioning and appraising social research proposals.

For applicants whose first language or language of instruction is not English you will need to meet the minimum requirements of an English Language qualification. The minimum of IELTS 6.5 overall with no element lower than 6.0, will be considered acceptable, or equivalent. You will require very good English language skills, especially on modules involving qualitative analysis.

If you have alternative qualifications or experience please contact us for advice before applying.

You will require access to a computer, which is capable of playing video and audio files via the internet, as well as word processing and e-mail. In order to run some of the analytic software, your computer must have a minimum of Windows XP or a similar up-to-date operating system so you can run Windows XP. You will also require constant internet access and a headphone/microphone combination.

Teaching excellence

Research plays an important role in informing our teaching and learning activities. Through research our staff remain up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, which means you develop knowledge and skills that are current and highly relevant to the workplace.


Student support

At the University of Huddersfield, you'll find support networks and services to help you get ahead in your studies and social life. Whether you study at undergraduate or postgraduate level, you'll soon discover that you're never far away from our dedicated staff and resources to help you to navigate through your personal student journey. Find out more about all our support services.

Important information

We will always try to deliver your course as described on this web page. However, sometimes we may have to make changes as set out below.

Changes to a course you have applied for

If we propose to make a major change to a course that you are holding an offer for, then we will tell you as soon as possible so that you can decide whether to withdraw your application prior to enrolment.

Changes to your course after you enrol as a student

We will always try to deliver your course and other services as described. However, sometimes we may have to make changes as set out below:

Changes to option modules

Where your course allows you to choose modules from a range of options, we will review these each year and change them to reflect the expertise of our staff, current trends in research and as a result of student feedback or demand for certain modules. We will always ensure that you have a range of options to choose from and we will let you know in good time the options available for you to choose for the following year.

Major changes

We will only make major changes to the core curriculum of a course or to our services if it is necessary for us to do so and provided such changes are reasonable. A major change in this context is a change that materially changes the services available to you; or the outcomes, or a significant part, of your course, such as the nature of the award or a substantial change to module content, teaching days (part time provision), classes, type of delivery or assessment of the core curriculum.

For example, it may be necessary to make a major change to reflect changes in the law or the requirements of the University’s regulators; to meet the latest requirements of a commissioning or accrediting body; to improve the quality of educational provision; in response to student, examiners’ or other course evaluators’ feedback; and/or to reflect academic or professional changes within subject areas. Major changes may also be necessary because of circumstances outside our reasonable control, such as a key member of staff leaving the University or being unable to teach, where they have a particular specialism that can’t be adequately covered by other members of staff; or due to damage or interruption to buildings, facilities or equipment.

Major changes would usually be made with effect from the next academic year, but this may not always be the case. We will notify you as soon as possible should we need to make a major change and will carry out suitable consultation with affected students. If you reasonably believe that the proposed change will cause you detriment or hardship we will, if appropriate, work with you to try to reduce the adverse effect on you or find an appropriate solution. Where an appropriate solution cannot be found and you contact us in writing before the change takes effect you can cancel your registration and withdraw from the University without liability to the University for future tuition fees. We will provide reasonable support to assist you with transferring to another university if you wish to do so.

Termination of course

In exceptional circumstances, we may, for reasons outside of our control, be forced to discontinue or suspend your course. Where this is the case, a formal exit strategy will be followed and we will notify you as soon as possible about what your options are, which may include transferring to a suitable replacement course for which you are qualified, being provided with individual teaching to complete the award for which you were registered, or claiming an interim award and exiting the University. If you do not wish to take up any of the options that are made available to you, then you can cancel your registration and withdraw from the course without liability to the University for future tuition fees and you will be entitled to a refund of all course fees paid to date. We will provide reasonable support to assist you with transferring to another university if you wish to do so.

When you enrol as a student of the University, your study and time with us will be governed by a framework of regulations, policies and procedures, which form the basis of your agreement with us. These include regulations regarding the assessment of your course, academic integrity, your conduct (including attendance) and disciplinary procedure, fees and finance and compliance with visa requirements (where relevant). It is important that you familiarise yourself with these as you will be asked to agree to abide by them when you join us as a student. You will find a guide to the key terms here, where you will also find links to the full text of each of the regulations, policies and procedures referred to.

The Higher Education Funding Council for England is the principal regulator for the University.