English Literature and History BA(Hons)

2019-20 (also available for 2020-21)

Places available in clearing. Find out more.
Places available in clearing. Find out more.

Start date

23 September 2019

Duration

3 years full-time
4 years inc. placement year

UCAS Code

VQ32

About the course

In 2018, our students gave English Literature a 96% satisfaction rating and History a 94% satisfaction rating (NSS 2018).

Are you excited when you open up a new book? Do great works of literature inspire you? And you’re fascinated by the events and the people that have shaped today’s modern world. The chance to study English literature and history side by side gives you a unique and enriching view of both subjects as they can both inform and underpin each other.

Our English Literature course spans hundreds of years of inspiration, from the English Renaissance of the 16th century right up to the present day. So whether you love Jacobean drama or contemporary poetry, you’ll be able to indulge your tastes and hopefully gain some new ones too.

Your choices on the History side of your degree are equally wide ranging. We’ll cover the cultural, social, historical and political impact of events and eras that have had a huge impact on today’s civilisation. Along the way you’ll be able to study conflicts, empires, disasters and more, from the medieval period right through to contemporary society.

The course is an equal mixture of both subjects. In your first year in History you’ll have the chance to learn more about early medieval Europe and 20th-century Britain. And in your Literature modules you’ll start looking at a wide range of literature, as well as literary criticism and theory.

The topics we cover aren’t just exciting and rewarding to study, they could help you develop some transferable skills that employers are looking for as well. You could go on to a career in fields such as teaching, librarianship, archives, the media, industry, the voluntary sector, PR, law and accountancy. In your second year, you’ll also have the opportunity to take a placement for five weeks.

Combining History and English Literature lets you have the best of both worlds. You’ll be able to study a range of historical periods and literary genres. Literary texts are often very revealing as historical sources and this degree will give you the chance to explore the connections between these two subjects.

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Dr Sarah Bastow, Head of History

Course detail

History

Core modules:

Early Medieval Europe: c500 - 1215

This module covers the history of, what was to become, Europe from the decline of the Western Roman Empire to the end of the 11th Century. It explores the religious and social history of the period, in a range of geographic locations and ethnic groups, from Scandinavia to the Eastern Mediterranean. You’ll have the opportunity to examine written sources alongside visual representations and material culture. You’ll also be advised how to find, evaluate and reference supporting material for your work; how to identify arguments and structure essays and document analyses; and how to present material orally, as well as in writing.

Twentieth Century Britain

Using a chronological and thematic approach, you'll be introduced to the major political, social, economic and cultural developments affecting British society in the 20th Century. This module falls within the ‘Communities and Welfare Research Group’ at the University and explores how Britons identified themselves with a variety of communities, relating to place, gender, class and other affiliations. It also explores the development of social policy in relation to the welfare state.

English Literature

Core modules:

Literary Genres

You'll be introduced to literary texts which represent the established genres that form the foundation of Western literary tradition. You'll have the opportunity to explore how they've been adapted, modified and reformed in later periods and across cultures. You'll also have the chance to explore literary conventions and innovations, along with concepts and terms used in the analysis of literary texts. The assessment for this module consists of a mixture of written coursework and presentational assignments.

Thinking Critically

This module introduces you to a range of potential approaches for the study of literature at university level. You'll have the opportunity to evaluate key ideas and concepts from a range of theoretical approaches, taking a critical perspective to the discipline as a whole. You'll then have the chance to explore how to apply these ideas to literary and other texts. The assessment for this module consists of a mixture of written coursework and presentational assignments.

Teaching and assessment

21.67% of the study time on this course is spent in lectures, seminars, tutorials etc. Some of your submissions may involve producing a podcast, contributing to an exhibition or working on an archive. The assessment of this course will be based on both written and practical work including examinations, essays, oral presentations, research analysis reports, posters, research projects, screencasts and portfolios.

You will also take part in workshops where you might learn how to write better essays, produce a digital artifact or design a research project. You will also have regular meetings with your personal tutor who will help you to reflect on your strengths and identify ways in which you can improve.

Your module specification/course handbook will provide full details of the assessment criteria applying to your course.

Feedback (either written and/or verbal) is normally provided on all coursework submissions within three term time weeks – unless the submission was made towards the end of the session in which case feedback would be available on request after the formal publication of results. Feedback on exam performance/final coursework is available on request after the publication of results.

Entry requirements

To find out if you are eligible for this course, please call our Clearing helpline on 0330 123 227701484 472777.

Placements


The course offers a compulsory 5 week work placement in Year 2. The course also offers an optional one-year (48 weeks) work placement after the second year, in the UK or abroad. This will give you the opportunity to gain valuable hands-on experience, insight into your chosen career and open up your graduate employment prospects. Our Placement Unit and academic staff have excellent industry links and can support you in applying for and finding your placement(s), as well as during your placement year.

Recent graduates have taken placements at The Royal Armouries, Wilson Solicitors, West Yorkshire Archives Service, Kirklees TV, Numberworks & Words and a range of primary and secondary schools.

I was attracted to the University of Huddersfield because of the History department's good reputation. As part of the course I did a 6 week placement in a High school in Halifax. It was a useful, challenging experience, which allowed me to develop many transferable skills.

debbie-kearns>

Debbie Kearns, English Literature and History BA(Hons)

Teaching excellence

  1. Huddersfield is a TEF gold-rated institution delivering consistently outstanding teaching and learning of the highest quality found in the UK (Teaching Excellence Framework, 2017).
  2. We won the first Global Teaching Excellence Award recognising the University’s commitment to world-class teaching and its success in developing students as independent learners and critical thinkers (HEA, 2017).
  3. Here at Huddersfield, you’ll be taught by some of the best lecturers in the country. We’ve been the English university with the highest proportion of professionally-qualified teaching staff for the past four years*.
  4. For the past ten years, we’ve been the UK’s leading university for National Teaching Fellowships too, which rate Britain’s best lecturers. It’s all part of our ongoing drive for teaching excellence, which helps our students to achieve great things too.
  5. We’re unique in the fact that all our permanent teaching staff** have, or are completing, doctorates. This expertise, together with our teaching credentials, means that students here learn from knowledgeable and well-qualified teachers and academics who are at the forefront of their subject area.

*HESA - First awarded in 2016, maintained in 2017, 2018 and 2019.

**Permanent staff, after probation: some recently appointed colleagues will only obtain recognition in the months after their arrival in Huddersfield, once they have started teaching; research degrees applies to those on contracts of more than half-time.

Hear from our Students

Your Career


As an English Literature and History graduate, you are valued for the advanced skills you have developed in analysis and communication, self-motivation, teamwork, creative problem solving and persuasiveness. Studying history alongside English allows you to keep your career options open.

Our graduates have gone on to a variety of careers within teaching, writing, local government, archives, the media, PR, law, politics and accountancy.

A selection of organisations that have employed Huddersfield graduates in recent years include BBC, Roma Publication, Emerald Group Publishing, House of Commons, the Civil Service, Royal Armouries Museum and British Red Cross. Others have opted for PGCE study and have become teachers, or continued their studies at Master's level.**

*Percentage of graduates from these subject areas at Huddersfield who go on to work and/or further study within six months of graduating (Destination of Leavers from Higher Education Survey 2016/17)

**Source: LinkedIn

90-100% Graduates employed*

Student support

At the University of Huddersfield, you'll find support networks and services to help you get ahead in your studies and social life. Whether you study at undergraduate or postgraduate level, you'll soon discover that you're never far away from our dedicated staff and resources to help you to navigate through your personal student journey. Find out more about all our support services.

Important information

We will always try to deliver your course as described on this web page. However, sometimes we may have to make changes as set out below.

Changes to a course you have applied for

If we propose to make a major change to a course that you are holding an offer for, then we will tell you as soon as possible so that you can decide whether to withdraw your application prior to enrolment.

Changes to your course after you enrol as a student

We will always try to deliver your course and other services as described. However, sometimes we may have to make changes as set out below:

Changes to option modules

Where your course allows you to choose modules from a range of options, we will review these each year and change them to reflect the expertise of our staff, current trends in research and as a result of student feedback or demand for certain modules. We will always ensure that you have a range of options to choose from and we will let you know in good time the options available for you to choose for the following year.

Major changes

We will only make major changes to the core curriculum of a course or to our services if it is necessary for us to do so and provided such changes are reasonable. A major change in this context is a change that materially changes the services available to you; or the outcomes, or a significant part, of your course, such as the nature of the award or a substantial change to module content, teaching days (part time provision), classes, type of delivery or assessment of the core curriculum.

For example, it may be necessary to make a major change to reflect changes in the law or the requirements of the University’s regulators; to meet the latest requirements of a commissioning or accrediting body; to improve the quality of educational provision; in response to student, examiners’ or other course evaluators’ feedback; and/or to reflect academic or professional changes within subject areas. Major changes may also be necessary because of circumstances outside our reasonable control, such as a key member of staff leaving the University or being unable to teach, where they have a particular specialism that can’t be adequately covered by other members of staff; or due to damage or interruption to buildings, facilities or equipment.

Major changes would usually be made with effect from the next academic year, but this may not always be the case. We will notify you as soon as possible should we need to make a major change and will carry out suitable consultation with affected students. If you reasonably believe that the proposed change will cause you detriment or hardship we will, if appropriate, work with you to try to reduce the adverse effect on you or find an appropriate solution. Where an appropriate solution cannot be found and you contact us in writing before the change takes effect you can cancel your registration and withdraw from the University without liability to the University for future tuition fees. We will provide reasonable support to assist you with transferring to another university if you wish to do so.

Termination of course

In exceptional circumstances, we may, for reasons outside of our control, be forced to discontinue or suspend your course. Where this is the case, a formal exit strategy will be followed and we will notify you as soon as possible about what your options are, which may include transferring to a suitable replacement course for which you are qualified, being provided with individual teaching to complete the award for which you were registered, or claiming an interim award and exiting the University. If you do not wish to take up any of the options that are made available to you, then you can cancel your registration and withdraw from the course without liability to the University for future tuition fees and you will be entitled to a refund of all course fees paid to date. We will provide reasonable support to assist you with transferring to another university if you wish to do so.

When you enrol as a student of the University, your study and time with us will be governed by a framework of regulations, policies and procedures, which form the basis of your agreement with us. These include regulations regarding the assessment of your course, academic integrity, your conduct (including attendance) and disciplinary procedure, fees and finance and compliance with visa requirements (where relevant). It is important that you familiarise yourself with these as you will be asked to agree to abide by them when you join us as a student. You will find a guide to the key terms here, where you will also find links to the full text of each of the regulations, policies and procedures referred to.

The Office for Students (OfS) is the principal regulator for the University.

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