Film Studies and History BA(Hons)

2019-20 (also available for 2020-21)

Places available in clearing. Find out more.
Places available in clearing. Find out more.

Start date

23 September 2019

Duration

3 years full-time
4 years inc. placement year

UCAS Code

PV13

About the course

Those who are passionate about understanding and narrating the past, about how we represent and construct the story of humankind throughout the centuries, are ideally suited for our Film and History course.

You’ll be able to choose from a range of optional modules in both film and history. We aim to give you a wide spectrum of topics to choose from, so you can build up a strong foundation of both subjects. Studying film, we’ll look at a wide range of cinematic forms. From popular cinema through to challenging avant-garde works, you’ll be able to study a rich and varied selection of genres. We’ll also look at topics like national cinemas and the work of individual filmmakers. You could look at adaptation, and how great works of literature are adapted to the big screen. Screenwriting, music and performance are all also part of the curriculum. As part of the wide mix of skills you’ll learn, we also give you a chance to try your hand at filmmaking. If you choose one of our documentary filmmaking modules you could get behind the camera and start exploring.

With history, we’ll give you the chance to shape your studies to your interests. Our modules are historically and geographically diverse, so you can pick the periods and places that fascinate you the most. Where we can we’ll work with primary source materials, and give you all the support you need during your studies. While you’re here you could build up some very useful and transferable skills. To analyse and communicate. To put together a convincing argument. To gain the self-discipline to work on your own, and to work with others to assess challenges and solve them. These are all vital skills that employers are looking for, and you could develop them on this course, while studying subjects that fascinate you.

Course detail

Core modules:

Texts

This module introduces you to the analysis of industrially produced, professional media texts along with user-generated content (UGC). It ranges across different textual formats (written, spoken, audiovisual) from ‘old’ media (such as the press, film or television) and ‘new’ media (YouTube clips/memes) in the digital era, providing you with a toolbox of analytical methods to understand the construction and meaning-making of such texts and it introduces the concept of genre, their origin, content and structure. You will analyse user-generated texts, such as GIFs, podcasts and promotional texts. Your seminars and workshops focus on studying textual forms with a particular focus on popular entertainment.

Video and Audio Production

The module introduces you to a range of audio and video technologies: mobile, online, TV/video and radio/audio. You will be provided with the essential studio and location skills necessary to produce a series of media artefacts, and to understand the language and concepts required to evaluate the product.

Twentieth Century Britain

Using a chronological and thematic approach, you'll be introduced to the major political, social, economic and cultural developments affecting British society in the 20th Century. This module falls within the ‘Communities and Welfare Research Group’ at the University and explores how Britons identified themselves with a variety of communities, relating to place, gender, class and other affiliations. It also explores the development of social policy in relation to the welfare state.

Writing for the Media and Storytelling

This module introduces students to a range of media and professional writing practices. Students will be guided to develop transferable skills for a broad range of media writing. They will analyse material in newspapers, magazines, broadcast and online and through progressive writing activities develop and hone their writing skills. The module will introduce students to different types of journalistic writing.

Early Medieval Europe: c500 - 1215

This module covers the history of, what was to become, Europe from the decline of the Western Roman Empire to the end of the 11th Century. It explores the religious and social history of the period, in a range of geographic locations and ethnic groups, from Scandinavia to the Eastern Mediterranean. You’ll have the opportunity to examine written sources alongside visual representations and material culture. You’ll also be advised how to find, evaluate and reference supporting material for your work; how to identify arguments and structure essays and document analyses; and how to present material orally, as well as in writing.

Teaching and assessment

Our degrees seek to develop your creative, technical and analytical skills, and every aspect of your learning is designed to help you succeed in the media, creative and cultural sectors. We thus work with a wide variety of teaching formats which alongside lectures, seminars and workshops, include newsdays, work-based learning and placements, project work, dissertations, one-on-one and group supervision, and digital learning. We continuously review and innovate teaching formats to reflect changing technologies and industry contexts. 17.55% of the time on your course will be spent on timetabled activities.

We use a variety of assessments, including video shorts, podcasts, newsroom days, audience research portfolios, essays, production pitches, data analytics, presentations, and dissertation. This allows you the ability to tailor your degree to fit your passions, interests and strengths. You will be taught by world-leading scholars whose research is helping to shape our understanding of how media, journalism and culture operate alongside industry-leading practitioners and producers, supplemented by a variety of guest talks.

Entry requirements

To find out if you are eligible for this course, please call our Clearing helpline on 0330 123 227701484 472777.

Placements


This course offers the opportunity to complete a 5 week work placement which is an optional element of the second year of the course.

The course also offers an optional one-year (48 weeks) work placement after the second year, in the UK or abroad. This will give you the opportunity to gain valuable hands-on experience, insight into your chosen career and open up your graduate employment prospects.

Previous placement providers have included Pen and Sword Books, Oldham Evening Chronicle, Lotherton Hall, Rochdale Law Centre and a range of primary and secondary schools.

I enjoyed making new friends at university. They are now some of my closest friends. I did a placement in my second year in the third term, which has helped me develop customer service and PR skills. I enjoy learning new skills that are helping me in my career. 

emily kelly>

Emily Kelly, Film Studies and History BA(Hons)

Teaching excellence

  1. Huddersfield is a TEF gold-rated institution delivering consistently outstanding teaching and learning of the highest quality found in the UK (Teaching Excellence Framework, 2017).
  2. We won the first Global Teaching Excellence Award recognising the University’s commitment to world-class teaching and its success in developing students as independent learners and critical thinkers (HEA, 2017).
  3. Here at Huddersfield, you’ll be taught by some of the best lecturers in the country. We’ve been the English university with the highest proportion of professionally-qualified teaching staff for the past four years*.
  4. For the past ten years, we’ve been the UK’s leading university for National Teaching Fellowships too, which rate Britain’s best lecturers. It’s all part of our ongoing drive for teaching excellence, which helps our students to achieve great things too.
  5. We’re unique in the fact that all our permanent teaching staff** have, or are completing, doctorates. This expertise, together with our teaching credentials, means that students here learn from knowledgeable and well-qualified teachers and academics who are at the forefront of their subject area.

*HESA - First awarded in 2016, maintained in 2017, 2018 and 2019.

**Permanent staff, after probation: some recently appointed colleagues will only obtain recognition in the months after their arrival in Huddersfield, once they have started teaching; research degrees applies to those on contracts of more than half-time.

Your Career


Media, creative and cultural sectors are one of the biggest and fastest growing in the UK. This degree will provide you with a combination of creative, technical and analytical skills for a variety of careers and roles in a rapidly developing digital economy.

*Whilst there are not enough graduate statistics for this specific course, 90% of graduates from the subject area of History at Huddersfield go on to work and/or further study within six months of graduating (Destination of Leavers from Higher Education Survey 2016/17).

100% Graduates employed*

Student support

At the University of Huddersfield, you'll find support networks and services to help you get ahead in your studies and social life. Whether you study at undergraduate or postgraduate level, you'll soon discover that you're never far away from our dedicated staff and resources to help you to navigate through your personal student journey. Find out more about all our support services.

Important information

We will always try to deliver your course as described on this web page. However, sometimes we may have to make changes as set out below.

Changes to a course you have applied for

If we propose to make a major change to a course that you are holding an offer for, then we will tell you as soon as possible so that you can decide whether to withdraw your application prior to enrolment.

Changes to your course after you enrol as a student

We will always try to deliver your course and other services as described. However, sometimes we may have to make changes as set out below:

Changes to option modules

Where your course allows you to choose modules from a range of options, we will review these each year and change them to reflect the expertise of our staff, current trends in research and as a result of student feedback or demand for certain modules. We will always ensure that you have a range of options to choose from and we will let you know in good time the options available for you to choose for the following year.

Major changes

We will only make major changes to the core curriculum of a course or to our services if it is necessary for us to do so and provided such changes are reasonable. A major change in this context is a change that materially changes the services available to you; or the outcomes, or a significant part, of your course, such as the nature of the award or a substantial change to module content, teaching days (part time provision), classes, type of delivery or assessment of the core curriculum.

For example, it may be necessary to make a major change to reflect changes in the law or the requirements of the University’s regulators; to meet the latest requirements of a commissioning or accrediting body; to improve the quality of educational provision; in response to student, examiners’ or other course evaluators’ feedback; and/or to reflect academic or professional changes within subject areas. Major changes may also be necessary because of circumstances outside our reasonable control, such as a key member of staff leaving the University or being unable to teach, where they have a particular specialism that can’t be adequately covered by other members of staff; or due to damage or interruption to buildings, facilities or equipment.

Major changes would usually be made with effect from the next academic year, but this may not always be the case. We will notify you as soon as possible should we need to make a major change and will carry out suitable consultation with affected students. If you reasonably believe that the proposed change will cause you detriment or hardship we will, if appropriate, work with you to try to reduce the adverse effect on you or find an appropriate solution. Where an appropriate solution cannot be found and you contact us in writing before the change takes effect you can cancel your registration and withdraw from the University without liability to the University for future tuition fees. We will provide reasonable support to assist you with transferring to another university if you wish to do so.

Termination of course

In exceptional circumstances, we may, for reasons outside of our control, be forced to discontinue or suspend your course. Where this is the case, a formal exit strategy will be followed and we will notify you as soon as possible about what your options are, which may include transferring to a suitable replacement course for which you are qualified, being provided with individual teaching to complete the award for which you were registered, or claiming an interim award and exiting the University. If you do not wish to take up any of the options that are made available to you, then you can cancel your registration and withdraw from the course without liability to the University for future tuition fees and you will be entitled to a refund of all course fees paid to date. We will provide reasonable support to assist you with transferring to another university if you wish to do so.

When you enrol as a student of the University, your study and time with us will be governed by a framework of regulations, policies and procedures, which form the basis of your agreement with us. These include regulations regarding the assessment of your course, academic integrity, your conduct (including attendance) and disciplinary procedure, fees and finance and compliance with visa requirements (where relevant). It is important that you familiarise yourself with these as you will be asked to agree to abide by them when you join us as a student. You will find a guide to the key terms here, where you will also find links to the full text of each of the regulations, policies and procedures referred to.

The Office for Students (OfS) is the principal regulator for the University.

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