Music Journalism BA(Hons)

2019-20 (also available for 2020-21)

Places available in clearing. Find out more.
Places available in clearing. Find out more.

Start date

23 September 2019

Duration

3 years full-time
4 years inc. placement year

UCAS Code

P502

About the course

Music and journalism are two of the most exciting and creative industries to work in. Our BA in Music Journalism lets you combine your shared passions for sound, social media and the written word.

QS World University Subject Rankings 2019 ranked the University of Huddersfield 25th in the world for 'Performing Arts'.

The course aims to give you a practical grounding in the styles and techniques of music journalism. We’ll look at everything from writing for the printed page to making compelling videos, plus radio shows and podcasts, all the while with a keen eye on how to make the most of social media platforms. You’ll be taught by tutors who are leading the way in their fields. Writers, broadcasters, academics and researchers all contribute, and our staff regularly work for national newspapers and magazines.

From Beatlemania to #KatyCats, music fans have been noisy, colourful - and increasingly significant. Our team of top international scholars in the growing area of media participation will help you put fandoms old and new into context, giving you the cutting-edge skills you need to carry out research of your own. And it’s not just rock and pop, you’ll develop a broad knowledge of a wide range of music genres.

There’s no substitute for putting what you’ve learned into practice, and you’ll take part in a work placement with an external client, which could range from doing public relations work for a band to spending time with a radio station.

Studying Music Journalism is much more than just writing about your favourite band. We’ll challenge you to explore a range of genres and give you the skills you need to embark on a range of exciting careers from journalism to music promotion to radio production.

Richard Jones

Richard Jones, Course Leader for Journalism and Music Journalism

Course detail

Core modules:

Writing for the Media and Storytelling

This module introduces students to a range of media and professional writing practices. Students will be guided to develop transferable skills for a broad range of media writing. They will analyse material in newspapers, magazines, broadcast and online and through progressive writing activities develop and hone their writing skills. The module will introduce students to different types of journalistic writing.

Video and Audio Production

The module introduces you to a range of audio and video technologies: mobile, online, TV/video and radio/audio. You will be provided with the essential studio and location skills necessary to produce a series of media artefacts, and to understand the language and concepts required to evaluate the product.

Grooves, Glitches and Crackles

This module traces both the developments and practical applications of technology in compositional practice as well as aesthetic issues in sound technology and practice. It will help you embrace theoretical writings concerning the proliferation of popular genres in contemporary culture as well as ways in which the computer and other technologies have challenged the definitions of sound and music. Key topics include: the history of early recording and electronic instruments, music and ethnicity, mixers, DJs and turntablism, club culture, electronica and sampling practice. The module is assessed through coursework, including two essays and an album review.

Industries

Whether the emphasis is on journalism, film, music, TV, broadcast sports, video games, online streaming, or another media form, the production of creative content always takes place in the context of specific industrial and organisational structures. This module provides you with an introduction to the key theories, concepts and methods needed to understand those structures, their impact on the professionals and organisations working within them, and the ways in which they shape the media landscape. The module places particular emphasis on political economic approaches to the media and production studies, but attention will also be given to theories of creativity, branding, and industrial conceptions of their audiences. Your seminars and workshops explore in particular media entertainment industries.

Technology

This module provides you with a detailed understanding of the role of technology in shaping and being shaped by mediated communication with a particular focus on digital media technologies. The module combines the critical analysis of media technologies with practical skills to use those technologies for media and creative industry professionals.

Users

This module examines media, audiences, users and participants. It will explore key approaches and debates in the analysis of audiences, in addition to understanding how they can be placed into social, historical and economic contexts. Attention will be paid to methodological questions about users, as well as examining key debates in Audience and Reception Studies, including active/passive debates; the digital public sphere and participation; questions of power and gender; the relationship between media producers, texts and users; the social construction of identity; and media and cultural globalisation and diaspora. By the end of the module students will be able to apply a wide range of theories about users, audiences and participants in historical and contemporary cultures, while comprehending the contexts and consequences of media convergence and the role of participatory media in the dissemination and reception of mediated content.Your seminars and workshops focus on audiences and users of creative media and entertainment content in particular.

Teaching and assessment

Our degrees seek to develop your creative, technical and analytical skills, and every aspect of your learning is designed to help you succeed in the media, creative and cultural sectors. We thus work with a wide variety of teaching formats which alongside lectures, seminars and workshops, include newsdays, work-based learning and placements, project work, dissertations, one-on-one and group supervision, and digital learning. We continuously review and innovate teaching formats to reflect changing technologies and industry contexts.19.46% of the time on your course will be spent on timetabled activities.

We use a variety of assessments, including video shorts, podcasts, newsroom days, audience research portfolios, essays, production pitches, data analytics, presentations, and dissertation. This allows you the ability to tailor your degree to fit your passions, interests and strengths. You will be taught by world-leading scholars whose research is helping to shape our understanding of how media, journalism and culture operate alongside industry-leading practitioners and producers, supplemented by a variety of guest talks.

Entry requirements

To find out if you are eligible for this course, please call our Clearing helpline on 0330 123 227701484 472777.

Placements


Our Music Journalism degree includes two exciting placement opportunities. Students are encouraged to undertake an optional year-long (48 weeks) placement in Year 3. We support our students in finding suitable placement opportunities in the Music and Media Industries and beyond. During the placement years you are supported by an academic tutor and have the opportunity to build professional experience invaluable for your final year of study and future career.

Our final year compulsory placement module also gives you the chance to put your skills into practice over a 150 hour period. Past students have undertaken placements with the NME as well as a range of other online music publications. Others have gone to radio stations from both the BBC and commercial sectors across the north of England, from Manchester to Hull and many points in between.

Through videography work I produced at university, I was able to gain enough experience and exposure to be offered a full-time position at Little Dot Studios in London. I now work as one of their in-house video editors and operation assistants.

Student at Workplace>

Woody Delaney, Music Journalism BA(Hons)

Teaching excellence

  1. Huddersfield is a TEF gold-rated institution delivering consistently outstanding teaching and learning of the highest quality found in the UK (Teaching Excellence Framework, 2017).
  2. We won the first Global Teaching Excellence Award recognising the University’s commitment to world-class teaching and its success in developing students as independent learners and critical thinkers (HEA, 2017).
  3. Here at Huddersfield, you’ll be taught by some of the best lecturers in the country. We’ve been the English university with the highest proportion of professionally-qualified teaching staff for the past four years*.
  4. For the past ten years, we’ve been the UK’s leading university for National Teaching Fellowships too, which rate Britain’s best lecturers. It’s all part of our ongoing drive for teaching excellence, which helps our students to achieve great things too.
  5. We’re unique in the fact that all our permanent teaching staff** have, or are completing, doctorates. This expertise, together with our teaching credentials, means that students here learn from knowledgeable and well-qualified teachers and academics who are at the forefront of their subject area.

*HESA - First awarded in 2016, maintained in 2017, 2018 and 2019.

**Permanent staff, after probation: some recently appointed colleagues will only obtain recognition in the months after their arrival in Huddersfield, once they have started teaching; research degrees applies to those on contracts of more than half-time.

Your Career


A selection of companies that have employed Huddersfield graduates from the BA Music Journalism course in recent years include a range of magazines and online publications. Some are having successful careers working for public relations and social media agencies, with other graduates using their journalism skills to move into marketing, fashion, event organising and recruitment.

*Percentage of graduates from this course who go on to work and/or further study within six months of graduating (Destination of Leavers from Higher Education Survey 2015/16 and 2016/17 aggregated)

90% Graduates employed*

Student support

At the University of Huddersfield, you'll find support networks and services to help you get ahead in your studies and social life. Whether you study at undergraduate or postgraduate level, you'll soon discover that you're never far away from our dedicated staff and resources to help you to navigate through your personal student journey. Find out more about all our support services.

Important information

We will always try to deliver your course as described on this web page. However, sometimes we may have to make changes as set out below.

Changes to a course you have applied for

If we propose to make a major change to a course that you are holding an offer for, then we will tell you as soon as possible so that you can decide whether to withdraw your application prior to enrolment.

Changes to your course after you enrol as a student

We will always try to deliver your course and other services as described. However, sometimes we may have to make changes as set out below:

Changes to option modules

Where your course allows you to choose modules from a range of options, we will review these each year and change them to reflect the expertise of our staff, current trends in research and as a result of student feedback or demand for certain modules. We will always ensure that you have a range of options to choose from and we will let you know in good time the options available for you to choose for the following year.

Major changes

We will only make major changes to the core curriculum of a course or to our services if it is necessary for us to do so and provided such changes are reasonable. A major change in this context is a change that materially changes the services available to you; or the outcomes, or a significant part, of your course, such as the nature of the award or a substantial change to module content, teaching days (part time provision), classes, type of delivery or assessment of the core curriculum.

For example, it may be necessary to make a major change to reflect changes in the law or the requirements of the University’s regulators; to meet the latest requirements of a commissioning or accrediting body; to improve the quality of educational provision; in response to student, examiners’ or other course evaluators’ feedback; and/or to reflect academic or professional changes within subject areas. Major changes may also be necessary because of circumstances outside our reasonable control, such as a key member of staff leaving the University or being unable to teach, where they have a particular specialism that can’t be adequately covered by other members of staff; or due to damage or interruption to buildings, facilities or equipment.

Major changes would usually be made with effect from the next academic year, but this may not always be the case. We will notify you as soon as possible should we need to make a major change and will carry out suitable consultation with affected students. If you reasonably believe that the proposed change will cause you detriment or hardship we will, if appropriate, work with you to try to reduce the adverse effect on you or find an appropriate solution. Where an appropriate solution cannot be found and you contact us in writing before the change takes effect you can cancel your registration and withdraw from the University without liability to the University for future tuition fees. We will provide reasonable support to assist you with transferring to another university if you wish to do so.

Termination of course

In exceptional circumstances, we may, for reasons outside of our control, be forced to discontinue or suspend your course. Where this is the case, a formal exit strategy will be followed and we will notify you as soon as possible about what your options are, which may include transferring to a suitable replacement course for which you are qualified, being provided with individual teaching to complete the award for which you were registered, or claiming an interim award and exiting the University. If you do not wish to take up any of the options that are made available to you, then you can cancel your registration and withdraw from the course without liability to the University for future tuition fees and you will be entitled to a refund of all course fees paid to date. We will provide reasonable support to assist you with transferring to another university if you wish to do so.

When you enrol as a student of the University, your study and time with us will be governed by a framework of regulations, policies and procedures, which form the basis of your agreement with us. These include regulations regarding the assessment of your course, academic integrity, your conduct (including attendance) and disciplinary procedure, fees and finance and compliance with visa requirements (where relevant). It is important that you familiarise yourself with these as you will be asked to agree to abide by them when you join us as a student. You will find a guide to the key terms here, where you will also find links to the full text of each of the regulations, policies and procedures referred to.

The Office for Students (OfS) is the principal regulator for the University.

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