Chemistry (MSc by Research)

2019-20 (also available for 2020-21)

This course is eligible for Master's loan funding. Find out more.

Start date

23 September 2019

13 January 2020

20 April 2020

Duration

The maximum duration for a part-time MSc by Research is 2 years (24 months) with an optional submission pending (writing up period) of 4 months.

If studying on a part-time basis, you must establish close links with the University and spend normally not less than an average of 10 working days per year in the university, excluding participation in activities associated with enrolment, re-registration and progression monitoring. You are also expected to dedicate 17.5 hours per week to the research.

Sometimes it may be possible to mix periods of both full-time and part-time study.

Application deadlines

For PGR start date January 2020

29 November 2019

For PGR start date April 2020

11 February 2020

For PGR start date September 2020

02 July 2020

About the research degree

A Master's by Research (MSc) allows you to undertake a two year (part-time) research degree. It contains little or no formal taught component. This type of study gives you the chance to explore a research topic over a shorter time than a more in-depth doctoral programme.

Research Master's students choose a specific project to work on and have a greater degree of independence in their work than is the case with a taught masters course.

You’ll be expected to work to an approved programme which you will develop in conjunction with your supervisor within the first few months of starting your studies. Whilst undertaking the research project you will also have the opportunity to develop your research skills by taking part in training courses and events.

At the end of the project you write up your findings in the form of a short thesis of around 25,000 words and this will then be examined.

On successful completion, you will be awarded your degree and if you have enjoyed this taste of research you may then decide to apply for the full research doctoral degree (PhD).

You will be appointed a main supervisor who will normally be part of a supervisory team, comprising up to three members. The research supervisor will advise and support you on your project.

Entry requirements

The normal entry requirements for enrolment on a MSc by Research is an upper second honours degree (2.1) from a UK university or a qualification of an equivalent standard, in a discipline appropriate to that of the proposed programme to be followed.

If your first language is not English, you will need to meet the minimum requirements of an English Language qualification. The minimum for IELTS is 6.0 overall with the written element at least 6.0 with no element lower than 5.5, or equivalent will be considered acceptable. Read more about the University’s entry requirements for students outside of the UK on our Where are you from information pages.

What can I research?

There are several research topics available for this degree. See below examples of research areas including an outline of the topics, the supervisor, funding information and eligibility criteria:

Outline

Small organic molecules are important in drug discovery and in novel materials research. The development of sustainable syntheses to these compounds using small organic molecules as catalysts is an important area of research. The aim of this project is to develop new iodoarene catalysts, especially chiral variants, and investigate their utility in the formation of small organic molecules.

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of £6,000 per annum are required.

Deadline

Home/EU -June 30th/October 31st and Overseas May 31st/September 30th

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) increasingly threatens our health and well-being, as infectious microbes evolve to become resistant to existing antibiotics. There is an ongoing need to discover new antibiotic classes and bring them to the clinic. The Minor Groove Binder (MGB) drug discovery platform of the Universities of Strathclyde and Huddersfield contains a family of novel compounds one of which, MGB-BP-3, is ready to enter Phase II Clinical Trial for the treatment of Clostridium difficile, in partnership with our developers MGB Biopharma.1 MGBs kill bacteria through binding to their DNA and interrupting essential bacterial metabolism, but importantly, they act at a number of targets within each cell, which means that variants that are resistant to MGBs have not been seen.2,3 We wish to investigate a range of new compounds from the MGB portfolio as potential agents for clinically challenging infections, principally those of the ESKAPE pathogen set, in addition to exploring their capacity to synergise with existing antibiotics.4,5 Beyond this, we are also interest in performing hit to lead optimisation in the antifungal, antimycobacterial and antiparasitic fields.

In a pilot study, we have already shown that in situations where a clinical pathogen has developed resistance to an existing antibiotic, dual therapy with an MGB may extend the effective lifetime of that antibiotic. This would ‘repurpose’ that ailing clinical antibiotic and extend its useful lifetime.

At present, there are a number of interesting avenues of both Chemistry and Biology research, which we wish to evaluate:

Chemistry 1. Design of novel antifungal MGBs 2. Design of novel antimycobacterial MGBs, particularly for TB. 3. Design of novel antiparasitic MGBs. 4. Design of novel antibacterial MGBs effective against Gram-negative pathogens. 5. Investigation of MGB physicochemical property modulation on activity profile against various pathogenic organisms.

Biology 1. Investigation of MGB synergy with a range of clinically relevant antibiotics. 2. Investigation of MGB synergy with a range of efflux pump inhibitors. 3. Investigation of MGB synergy with other MGBs. 4. Investigation of mechanism of action of novel MGBs that are exiting our current synthetic medicinal chemistry pipeline.

This project provides students with the opportunity to contribute to our Global MGB Drug Development efforts, and assist with developing a better understanding of our emerging new class of antibiotic.

References 1 http://www.mgb-biopharma.com/mgb-biopharma-successfully-completes-phase-i-clinical-trial-with-oral-mgb-bp-3-a-truly-novel-antibiotic-targeting-clostridium-difficile-infections/ https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02518607?term=mgb&rank=1 2 F. J. Scott et al., Eur J Med Chem. 2017 Aug 18;136:561-572. 3 F. J. Scott et al., Euro. J. Med. Chem., 2016, 116, 116–125. 4 F. J. Scott et al., Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett., 2016, 26, 3478-86. 5 F. J. Scott et al., Bioorg. Med. Chem Lett., 2016, 26, 3326-3329.

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of between £3-£15,000 per annum are required depending on the nature of the project.

Deadline

Home/EU – for September- June 30th, for January-October 31st and Overseas for September- May 31st, for January- September 30th

Supervisors

No supervisors found

How to apply

Outline

This project involves the combination of thermal analysis and ambient ionisation mass spectrometry (specifically, DART-MS). A new integrated system has been developed that allows for investigation of the behaviour of complex materials as a function of temperature. The successful candidate will further develop and refine the system and investigate its wide-ranging applications.

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of £3,000 per annum are required.

Deadline

Home/EU -June 30th/October 31st and Overseas May 31st/September 30th

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

The nature of fabric manufacture can cause fabric producers to enforce long lead times and large minimum orders on their customers, making it difficult to produce bespoke fabrics in limited quantities. The research programme will be directed at materials development in one or more of the following areas: polymer development, textile functionalisation, and stratified fabric production. In addition to process development and characterisation, this project will design new or adapt existing fabric manufacturing processes and establish underpinning structure-property relationships.

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of between £3-£15,000 per annum are required depending on the nature of the project.

Deadline

Home/EU – for September- June 30th, for January-October 31st and Overseas for September- May 31st, for January- September 30th

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Blood flow is severely restricted in the periphery compartments of a tumour biomass, cells in these regions live under hypoxic conditions with limited availability of glucose sugars. What is not clear is if these cells are able to recycle sugars from the surface of dead and lysing cells and, if so, if mannose can be recycled from surface glycans for use as a carbon feed. In this research project, we are proposing to investigate the role of mannose metabolism within hypoxic cancer cells. A number of enzymes are involved in the uptake and transformation of mannose including MPI (phosphomannose isomerase) which controls the flux between catabolism and glycan formation.

In this project we will follow kinetic features of mannose metabolism within a variety of cancer cell lines, under both aerobic and hypoxic conditions. We will investigate the levels of production of MPI using classical activity measurements where the rate of transformation of mannose-6-phosphate to fructose 6-phosphate will be studied. We will use a range of analytical procedures, including both HPAEC-PAD and NMR, to monitor the change in concentration of Mannose, Man-6-P and Fru-6-P as a function of time. In the latter stages of the programme we will study the effect of a range of simple sugar analogues as inhibitors of the catabolic pathway in an attempt to block the triple negative cancer cells from utilising mannose as a carbon feed.

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of between £3-£15,000 per annum are required depending on the nature of the project.

Deadline

Home/EU – for September- June 30th, for January-October 31st and Overseas for September- May 31st, for January- September 30th

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Textile wet processing is currently an important aspect of textile production as it adds value to the textiles by improving aesthetics, comfort and functional properties. However, wet processing consumes substantial volumes of water and chemicals, which frequently have associated health and/or environmental hazards, and subsequently produce high quantities of effluent requiring expensive dilution and/or treatment. This research will investigate alternative dry finishing processes that can offer lower costs, reduced environmental impact, and the potential to produce new products with improved performance. This research will incorporate materials development in one or more of the following areas: polymer development, colouration of textiles, textile functionalisation, and plasma treatment.

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of between £3-£15,000 per annum are required depending on the nature of the project.

Deadline

Home/EU – for September- June 30th, for January-October 31st and Overseas for September- May 31st, for January- September 30th

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

This research will be in the area of synthetic organic chemistry and will focus specifically on the synthesis of heterocyclic natural products. The targets of this project are the indolizidine and pyrrolizidine alkaloids. These systems are of interest in the possible treatment of various diseases such as cancer, diabetes and viral infections such as AIDS, and some of them have the potential to function as potent analgesics or as potential treatments for Alzheimer’s disease and other neurological disorders. Examples of such compounds include the well-known "poison frog alkaloids".

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of £6,000 per annum are required.

Deadline

Home/EU -June 30th/October 31st and Overseas May 31st/September 30th

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

We are involved in research programmes with cancer biologists that require the preparation of novel molecules for testing. This includes the development of synthetic methodology to prepare potential drugs containing fluorescent tags and antibody conjugates.

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of £xx per annum are required.

Deadline

Home/EU -June 30th/October 31st and Overseas May 31st/September 30th

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Silicon is the second most abundant element on Earth however its synthetic chemistry has been little studied compared to its close neighbour carbon. The aim of this project is to develop new synthetic methods to access silicon heterocycles. These types of compounds are becoming of increasing interest in drug discovery.

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of £6,000 per annum are required.

Deadline

Home/EU -June 30th/October 31st and Overseas May 31st/September 30th

Supervisors

How to apply

All major areas of chemistry are covered with areas of strength including:

• synthetic organic chemistry • physical organic chemistry • carbohydrates, proteins and enzyme chemistry • organometallic and supramolecular chemistry • heterogeneous catalysis and adsorption • thermal methods of analysis and synthesis • materials chemistry

To find out more about the research we conduct, take a look at our Research, Innovation and Skills webpages, where you will find information on each research area. To find out about our staff visit ‘Our experts’ which features profiles of all our academic staff.

You will need to complete a research proposal outlining your areas of interest and when this is submitted along with your research degree application form we will look for the academics within the University who have the expertise and knowledge to supervise you and guide you through your research degree.

Researcher Enviroment

The University of Huddersfield has a thriving research community made up of over 1,350 postgraduate research students. We have students studying on a part-time and full-time basis from all over the world with around 43% from overseas and 57% from the UK.

Research plays an important role in informing all our teaching and learning activities. Through undertaking research our staff remain up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, which means you develop knowledge and skills which are current and relevant to your specialist area.

Find out more about our research staff and centres

Student support

Tuition fees

At the University of Huddersfield, you'll find support networks and services to help you get ahead in your studies and social life. Whether you study at undergraduate or postgraduate level, you'll soon discover that you're never far away from our dedicated staff and resources to help you to navigate through your personal student journey. Find out more about all our support services.

Important information

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