Pharmaceutical Sciences (MSc by Research)

2019-20 (also available for 2020-21)

This course is eligible for Master's loan funding. Find out more.

Start date

23 September 2019

13 January 2020

20 April 2020

Duration

The maximum duration for a part-time MSc by Research is 2 years (24 months) with an optional submission pending (writing up period) of 4 months.

If studying on a part-time basis, you must establish close links with the University and spend normally not less than an average of 10 working days per year in the university, excluding participation in activities associated with enrolment, re-registration and progression monitoring. You are also expected to dedicate 17.5 hours per week to the research.

Sometimes it may be possible to mix periods of both full-time and part-time study.

Application deadlines

For PGR start date January 2020

29 November 2019

For PGR start date April 2020

11 February 2020

For PGR start date September 2020

02 July 2020

About the research degree

A Master's by Research (MSc) allows you to undertake a two year (part-time) research degree. It contains little or no formal taught component. This type of study gives you the chance to explore a research topic over a shorter time than a more in-depth doctoral programme.

Research Master's students choose a specific project to work on and have a greater degree of independence in their work than is the case with a taught masters course.

You’ll be expected to work to an approved programme which you will develop in conjunction with your supervisor within the first few months of starting your studies. Whilst undertaking the research project you will also have the opportunity to develop your research skills by taking part in training courses and events.

At the end of the project you write up your findings in the form of a short thesis of around 25,000 words and this will then be examined.

On successful completion, you will be awarded your degree and if you have enjoyed this taste of research you may then decide to apply for the full research doctoral degree (PhD).

You will be appointed a main supervisor who will normally be part of a supervisory team, comprising up to three members. The research supervisor will advise and support you on your project.

Entry requirements

The normal entry requirements for enrolment on a MSc by Research is an upper second honours degree (2.1) from a UK university or a qualification of an equivalent standard, in a discipline appropriate to that of the proposed programme to be followed.

If your first language is not English, you will need to meet the minimum requirements of an English Language qualification. The minimum for IELTS is 6.0 overall with the written element at least 6.0 with no element lower than 5.5, or equivalent will be considered acceptable. Read more about the University’s entry requirements for students outside of the UK on our Where are you from information pages.

What can I research?

There are several research topics available for this degree. See below examples of research areas including an outline of the topics, the supervisor, funding information and eligibility criteria:

Outline

Drug delivery via the mucosal routes such as the oral cavity, gastrointestinal tract, urinary bladder, vagina and rectum offer several advantages such as drug targeting, enhanced drug delivery etc. This research is focused on design and evaluation of novel dosage forms and materials for mucosal delivery of drugs and macromolecules. This project will involve the use of polymers modified for enhance mucosal interactions and the design of dosage forms such as wafers, gels, films, patches etc.

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of between £3-£15,000 per annum are required depending on the nature of the project.

Deadline

Home/EU – for September- June 30th, for January-October 31st and Overseas for September- May 31st, for January- September 30th

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

We are looking to identifying biomarkers to help diagnose and predict Multiple Sclerosis and related disorders. These includes breath and blood analysis to pinpoint indicators of how the disease progresses.

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of between £3-£15,000 per annum are required depending on the nature of the project.

Deadline

Home/EU – for September- June 30th, for January-October 31st and Overseas for September- May 31st, for January- September 30th

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Antibiotic resistance is a major threat to public health worldwide. Studies showed that infection with resistant bacteria is associated with an increased rate of morbidity and mortality, longer hospital stay and, increased antibiotic consumption. The aim of this research is to optimise antibiotic use by identifying inappropriate antibiotic prescribing practices, inform current antibiotic guidelines, and measure its impact on reducing healthcare acquired infections. The research will involve creating a data-set that include information on antibiotic use, infection control practices, and healthcare acquired infections. A comprehensive assessment of current antibiotic prescribing practices will be undertaken aiming at identifying inappropriate antibiotic use and optimal antibiotic prescribing practices. This will be followed by developing an intervention to reduce current antibiotic use through informing and amending current antibiotic guidelines with identified appropriate antibiotic prescribing practices. The developed intervention will be implemented across the study site hospital, and its impact will be measured.

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of between £3-£15,000 per annum are required depending on the nature of the project.

Deadline

Home/EU – for September- June 30th, for January-October 31st and Overseas for September- May 31st, for January- September 30th

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

With a lot of new chemical entities (NCE) being classed according to the Biopharmaceutical Classification System (BCS) as Class II, there is a growing need to improve their solubility. Belonging to class II means they have low solubility but high permeability and therefore high peroral dose. Enhancement of their dissolution due to the poor solubility is therefore key in ensuring a suitable plasma concentration for therapeutic effect. Techniques such as particle size reduction, prodrug derivatisation, use of surfactants, salt formation, cocrystallisation and solid dispersions to name a few are used to improve solubility. This projects aims at using novel techniques in engineering the particle sizes of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) in the quest of achieving improved solubility in these systems and characterising them.

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of between £3-£15,000 per annum are required depending on the nature of the project.

Deadline

Home/EU – for September- June 30th, for January-October 31st and Overseas for September- May 31st, for January- September 30th

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Magnesium aluminum silicate is a sheet-type clay mineral and a saponite in the smectite group. Smectites have a basic three-layered structure (tetrahedral– octahedral–tetrahedral layers) in which an octahedral layer with an Mg atom in the centre and six apical oxygen atoms are present between regular tetrahedral layers with an Si atom in the centre and four apical oxygen atoms. Clays have many different applications as reviewed in literature. The objectives of this study is to fully understand and determine pharmaceutically relevant properties of clays with regards to its suitability in solid dosage forms using compression analysis, small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), isothermal calorimetry (ITC) and x-ray microtomography (XµT)

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of between £3-£15,000 per annum are required depending on the nature of the project.

Deadline

Home/EU – for September- June 30th, for January-October 31st and Overseas for September- May 31st, for January- September 30th

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Accumulating evidence links activation of oestrogen receptors (ERβ) to suppression of neuroinflammation in the microglia, with the resulting neuroprotective effect. Estradiol has been shown to exhibit anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects in the brain. However, clinical use of this hormone is controversial because of its peripheral actions related to risks of endometrial and breast cancers. Consequently, PhD research in this topic will investigate potential selective oestrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) from natural products (phytoestrogens) for anti neuroinflammatory and neuroprotective effects. The project will also determine whether these compounds induce proliferation of cultured endometrial and breast cancer cell lines. The project will involve biochemical techniques, cell culture, live cell imaging, western blotting, ELISAs, immunofluorescence, RNAi, miRNA analysis, and epigenetics.

Funding

Self-funding applications are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of £8,000 per annum are required.

Deadline

Home/EU-June 30th/October 31st and Overseas May 31st/September 30th

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

We are looking to repurpose known drugs for the use in inflammatory conditions, including neuropathic pain. Repurposing allows for a more rapid drug development, as previously approved drugs will not require the stringency of clinical trials.

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of between £3-£15,000 per annum are required depending on the nature of the project.

Deadline

Home/EU – for September- June 30th, for January-October 31st and Overseas for September- May 31st, for January- September 30th

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

UV imaging has been used as a platform for observing the behaviour of pharmaceutical compounds. The surface dissolution imaging instrument (SDI) has been used in determining the intrinsic dissolution rates (IDR) of compounds due to its compound sparing approach and has been used to observe phenomena such as the swelling behaviour of hydrophilic matrices, capsule dissolution and drug precipitation. We have also developed a Franz cell prototype (patented) at allows imaging through biological and synthetic skin membranes. This project aims to utilise this imaging platform in providing further insights into the behaviour of pharmaceuticals with the prospect of speeding up the preformulation stage thereby reducing costs

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of between £3-£15,000 per annum are required depending on the nature of the project.

Deadline

Home/EU – for September- June 30th, for January-October 31st and Overseas for September- May 31st, for January- September 30th

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Conventional nail formulations are not fully effective due to limited drug permeation across the compact keratinized structure of the nail plate. Drug permeation through the nail plate is important for treating nail diseases and infections. Therefore, there is currently a need for more effective formulations in the treatment of nail diseases. This project will explore the use of novel combination of approaches in the design of ungunal and transungunal formulations in order to enhance to drug delivery to the nail.

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of between £3-£15,000 per annum are required depending on the nature of the project.

Deadline

Home/EU – for September- June 30th, for January-October 31st and Overseas for September- May 31st, for January- September 30th

Supervisors

How to apply

We undertake world class research across a range of disciplines - from identifying targets for new drugs to combat important diseases like depression through to developing and improving drug delivery methods by inhalation and other routes. Research within the Pharmaceutical Sciences can be split into themes:

• Pharmaceutics • Material Sciences • Pharmacology and Pharmacogenomics.

To find out more about the research we conduct, take a look at our Research, Innovation and Skills webpages, where you will find information on each research area. To find out about our staff visit ‘Our experts’ which features profiles of all our academic staff.

You will need to complete a research proposal outlining your areas of interest and when this is submitted along with your research degree application form we will look for the academics within the University who have the expertise and knowledge to supervise you and guide you through your research degree.

Researcher Enviroment

The University of Huddersfield has a thriving research community made up of over 1,350 postgraduate research students. We have students studying on a part-time and full-time basis from all over the world with around 43% from overseas and 57% from the UK.

Research plays an important role in informing all our teaching and learning activities. Through undertaking research our staff remain up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, which means you develop knowledge and skills which are current and relevant to your specialist area.

Find out more about our research staff and centres

Student support

Tuition fees

At the University of Huddersfield, you'll find support networks and services to help you get ahead in your studies and social life. Whether you study at undergraduate or postgraduate level, you'll soon discover that you're never far away from our dedicated staff and resources to help you to navigate through your personal student journey. Find out more about all our support services.

Important information

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When you enrol as a student of the University, your study and time with us will be governed by a framework of regulations, policies and procedures, which form the basis of your agreement with us. These include regulations regarding the assessment of your course, academic integrity, your conduct (including attendance) and disciplinary procedure, fees and finance and compliance with visa requirements (where relevant). It is important that you familiarise yourself with these as you will be asked to agree to abide by them when you join us as a student. You will find a guide to the key terms here, along with the Student Protection Plan, where you will also find links to the full text of each of the regulations, policies and procedures referred to.

The Office for Students (OfS) is the principal regulator for the University.