Education (PhD)

2020-21 (also available for 2019-20)

This course is eligible for Doctoral loan funding. Find out more.

Start date

21 September 2020

11 January 2021

5 April 2021

5 July 2021

Duration

The maximum duration for a full-time PhD is 3 years (36 months) with an optional submission pending (writing up period) of 12 months.

Sometimes it may be possible to mix periods of both full-time and part-time study.

Application deadlines

For PGR start date January 2020

29 November 2019

For PGR start date April 2020

11 February 2020

For PGR start date September 2020

02 July 2020

About the research degree

A PhD is the highest academic award for which a student can be registered. A PhD thesis makes an original contribution to knowledge. You will identify a research project and your thesis will be a substantial and unique piece of work. Your programme of work will include participating in conferences and seminars. You will attend relevant aspects of postgraduate courses and may engage in guided reading or a combination of study methods.

You will be supervised by a team of up to 3 members including a main supervisor who will advise and support you throughout your project. At the end of a 3-year full-time or six year part-time period of research and writing, you will submit a thesis which will be up to 80,000 words long. You will have developed a range of personal and professional transferrable skills which will be invaluable in your future career.

Completing a PhD can give you a great sense of personal achievement and help you develop a high level of transferable skills which will be useful in your subsequent career, as well as contributing to the development of knowledge in your chosen field.

Entry requirements

The normal level of attainment required for entry is:

  • Master's degree or an Honours degree (2:1 or above) or an equivalent professional qualification, in a discipline appropriate to the proposed programme to be followed, or
  • appropriate research or professional experience at postgraduate level, which has resulted in published work, written reports or other appropriate evidence of accomplishment.

As a PhD applicant you will need to submit an online application direct to the University and this should contain a provisional research proposal of between 1500-2000 words (plus bibliography). This should include key criteria that will enable the selector to evaluate the scope and importance of your project and to assist with identifying academic supervision with the necessary expertise and knowledge to supervise you and guide you through your research degree.

If your first language is not English, you will need to meet the minimum requirements of an English Language qualification. The minimum for IELTS is 6.5 overall with no element lower than 6.0, or equivalent will be considered acceptable. Read more about the University’s entry requirements for students outside of the UK on our Where are you from information pages.

Why Choose Huddersfield?


Watch this clip to find out five great reasons to choose the University of Huddersfield for postgraduate study.

What can I research?

There are several research topics available for this degree. See below examples of research areas including an outline of the topics, the supervisor, funding information and eligibility criteria:

Outline

Research topics could focus on any age group or community including the impact of government policies such as ‘Prevent’, the extent to which the political and organisational policies and frameworks facilitate / inhibit the translation of values into practice; marginalisation; faith, culture and pedagogies; policy work around cohesion, community perceptions of community cohesion, education and extremism.

Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Research topics could focus on children and young people’s perspectives on and experiences of formal schooling; developing ethical practice in early years settings; young adults and the ‘gig economy’; young people, youth, unemployment, work, poverty, crime, class, inequality and the significance of place, children’s physical development; educational and labour market experiences of marginalised youth, and experiences of teachers, support workers and other practitioners working with young people.

Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Research topics could focus on the management of change; Education for the knowledge economy; internationalisation, Leadership in early childhood education and care, professionalisation of the Early Years workforce, teacher development.

Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Research topics could focus on youth and community work (its history and practices), adult literacy and numeracy, the provision of accessible routes into education; youth work education in HE settings,the impact of class, gender, ethnicity, disability, sexuality on outcomes.

Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Research topics could focus on narrative and feminist approaches to research; participatory, creative and visual methods, research ethics; quantitative research methods in educational research; ethnographic approaches.

Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Research topics could focus on any aspect of work undertaken in further and /or higher education colleges, the re-engineering of education, the political economy of education, lived experience; workplace learning, cognitive capitalism and emancipatory practice; IELTS and English language teaching / learning.

Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Research topics might focus on relationships between educational practitioners and students / participants / clients; education, politics and questions of social justice; Professional identity, agency and autonomy; education and popular culture; the translation of professional values into practice, the way in which practitioners draw on their professional value-base to inform their work with young people and the wider community, employability and ‘care’, learner autonomy.

Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Research topics could focus on young people’s experiences of alternative education provisions; home education; interventions aimed at retaining and improving the outcomes for students at risk of leaving education or of underachieving.

Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Research topics could focus on education for sustainability in particular countries or contexts, curriculum design.

Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Research topics could focus on blended learning; critical understanding of technology within higher education teaching and learning; critical understanding of learner analytical dashboards in higher education, social networking and social media in education, multimedia pedagogy, e-tutoring.

Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Research topics could focus on confidence and teacher educators; work-based learning – developing reflective practice; effective work place mentoring; the links between education and national development, vocational pedagogy, research about FE-based teacher educators, trainee teachers and FE-based teacher education.

Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Supervisors

How to apply

The main topic areas that can be supervised in the subject area are:

[] Policy [] Professional Identities [*] Pedagogies

Recent research topics have reflected these groups and include: [] The expectations and experiences of working-class law students at a 'new' university. [] Engaging with learning within the UK HE context: A narrative inquiry of international student experience. [] Postgraduate Study: The Expectations of Students and Course Leaders. [] Problem-based learning in Islamic education in the formal curriculum: A case study of secondary girls' education in the Kingdom of Bahrain. [] The best use of technology to support the learning of part time undergraduates. [] Exploring the Attitudes and Perceptions of Head-Teachers relating to Physical Risky-Play in Four to Eight Year-olds in Three State Primary Schools in Northern England. [] Marginalisation and the white working class: an ethnographic study of NEET young men in a northern inner-city. [] The Impact of primary teachers' pedagogical knowledge and autonomy on the teaching of early reading. [] It's not as straightforward as it sounds. An Action Research Study of a Team of Further Education-Based Teacher Educators and their use of Modelling during a Period of De-Regulation and Austerity. [] An investigation into how to build an effective learning environment for secondary school leaders and managers. [] Problems faced by Libyan Learners of English. [] Youth work's contribution to provision for young people with mental health issues in the borough of Bury, Greater Manchester. [*] The impact of a Forest School approach to support children's learning and development.

To find out more about the research we conduct, take a look at our Research, Innovation and Skills webpages, where you will find information on each research area. To find out about our staff visit ‘Our experts’ which features profiles of all our academic staff.

You will need to complete a research proposal outlining your areas of interest and there is guidance for PhD applicants. When this is submitted along with your research degree application form we will look for the academics within the University who have the expertise and knowledge to supervise you and guide you through your research degree.

Researcher Enviroment

The University of Huddersfield has a thriving research community made up of over 1,350 postgraduate research students. We have students studying on a part-time and full-time basis from all over the world with around 43% from overseas and 57% from the UK.

Research plays an important role in informing all our teaching and learning activities. Through undertaking research our staff remain up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, which means you develop knowledge and skills which are current and relevant to your specialist area.

Find out more about our research staff and centres

Student support

At the University of Huddersfield, you'll find support networks and services to help you get ahead in your studies and social life. Whether you study at undergraduate or postgraduate level, you'll soon discover that you're never far away from our dedicated staff and resources to help you to navigate through your personal student journey. Find out more about all our support services.

Important information

We will always try to deliver your course as described on this web page. However, sometimes we may have to make changes to aspects of a course or how it is delivered. We only make these changes if they are for reasons outside of our control, or where they are for our students' benefit. We will let you know about any such changes as soon as possible. Our regulations set out our procedure which we will follow when we need to make any such changes.

When you enrol as a student of the University, your study and time with us will be governed by a framework of regulations, policies and procedures, which form the basis of your agreement with us. These include regulations regarding the assessment of your course, academic integrity, your conduct (including attendance) and disciplinary procedure, fees and finance and compliance with visa requirements (where relevant). It is important that you familiarise yourself with these as you will be asked to agree to abide by them when you join us as a student. You will find a guide to the key terms here, along with the Student Protection Plan, where you will also find links to the full text of each of the regulations, policies and procedures referred to.

The Office for Students (OfS) is the principal regulator for the University.