Engineering (PhD)

2020-21

This course is eligible for Doctoral loan funding. Find out more.

Start date

21 September 2020

18 January 2021

19 April 2021

Duration

The maximum duration for a part-time PhD is 6 years (72 months) with an optional submission pending (writing up period) of 12 months.

If studying on a part-time basis, you must establish close links with the University and spend normally not less than an average of 10 working days per year in the university, excluding participation in activities associated with enrolment, re-registration and progression monitoring. You are also expected to dedicate 17.5 hours per week to the research.

Sometimes it may be possible to mix periods of both full-time and part-time study.

Application deadlines

For PGR start date January 2021

20 November 2020

For PGR start date April 2021

26 February 2021

For PGR start date July 2021

11 June 2021

For PGR start date September 2021

02 July 2021

About the research degree

A PhD is the highest academic award for which a student can be registered. This programme allows you to explore and pursue a research project built around a substantial piece of work, which has to show evidence of original contribution to knowledge.

A PhD is a programme of research, culminating in the production of a large-scale piece of written work in the form of a research thesis that should not normally exceed 80,000 words (excluding ancillary data).

Completing a PhD can give you a great sense of personal achievement and help you develop a high level of transferable skills which will be useful in your subsequent career, as well as contributing to the development of knowledge in your chosen field.

You are expected to work to an approved programme of work including appropriate programmes of postgraduate study (which may be drawn from parts of existing postgraduate courses, final year degree programmes, conferences, seminars, masterclasses, guided reading or a combination of study methods).

You will be appointed a main supervisor who will normally be part of a supervisory team, comprising up to three members to advise and support you on your project.

Entry requirements

The normal level of attainment required for entry is:

  • A Master’s degree or an honours degree (2:1 or above) or equivalent, in a discipline appropriate to the proposed programme to be followed, or appropriate research or professional experience at postgraduate level, which has resulted in published work, written reports or other appropriate evidence of accomplishment.

If your first language is not English, you will need to meet the minimum requirements of an English Language qualification. The minimum for IELTS is 6.0 overall with no element lower than 5.5, or equivalent will be considered acceptable. Read more about the University’s entry requirements for students outside of the UK on our Where are you from information pages.

Why choose Huddersfield?


There are many reasons to choose the University of Huddersfield and here are just five of them:

  1. We were named University of the Year by Times Higher Education in 2013.
  2. Huddersfield is the only University where 100% of permanent teaching staff are Fellows of the Higher Education Authority.
  3. Our courses have been accredited by 41 professional bodies.
  4. 94.6% of our postgraduate students go on to work and/or further study within six months of graduating.
  5. We have world-leading applied research groups in Biomedical Sciences, Engineering and Physical Sciences, Social Sciences and Arts and Humanities.

What can I research?

There are several research topics available for this degree. See below examples of research areas including an outline of the topics, the supervisor, funding information and eligibility criteria:

Outline

This project will deliver a code for inverse design of blade surface for different climatic conditions. The wind turbine systems incorporating these blades will be expected to be effective in extreme weather conditions. The main benefit of this work will be to increase the efficiency of operation of wind turbines in cold regions which will also contribute to the improvement of turbine safety and lifetime.

Funding

Please see our Research Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Our standard University deadlines apply. Please see our Deadlines for Applications page to find out more.

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Through previous collaborative research a novel electron beam, powder bed Additive Manufacturing (AM) process has been developed. The new process has significant commercial (mass of material processed per hour) and technical (very broad process window allowing material microstructure control and in-process monitoring for quality assurance) benefits over current e-beam and laser based powder bed systems available on the market today. The new technology patented as NeuBeam is capable of neutralizing the charge accumulation that tends to occur with other electron beam technologies such as electron beam melting (EBM). This results in potentially a wider range of viable print parameters when compared to other electron beam or laser-based PBF technologies. The NeuBeam Technology is new and its full potential for processing Ti alloys has yet to be established. In order for it to become accepted in the market, material studies are needed to validate the claims and explore the boundaries and capabilities of this exciting technology. This validation work will be a core part of the proposed PhD. The novelty of the work lies in the application of the new processing technology to Ti structures with complex geometries and lattice structures as well as the prospect of manipulation of the AM part microstructure. End users (in the aerospace and medical implant fields) are very interested but need to see validation of the technology in terms of material properties.

The program of work will cover exploring the optimum process parameters of the NeuBeam technology to: 1. Optimise NeuBeam processing rates for Ti alloys 2. Optimising NeuBeamTi part density as assessed using X-ray Computer Tomography 3. Controlling part surface topography 4. Demonstrating control of Ti part microstructure and minimising thermal cracking using NeuBeam techniques 5. Investigate the mechanical properties of part obtained by NeuBeam AM 6. Exploring the production of fine lattice structures beyond the scope of conventional E-Beam AM using NeuBeam methods.

This project is a partnership between the EPSRC Future Metrology Hub and Wayland Additive Ltd. Wayland Additive is a very young start-up company that has formed from seed R&D carried out by Reliance Precision Limited. Significant periods of study will be spent at the sponsoring company which is less than 5km from the University The company will provide an additional top up to any bursary associated with the project to the tune of £1000 pa.

Funding

Please see our Research Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Our standard University deadlines apply. Please see our Deadlines for Applications page to find out more.

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Renewable energy is an essential source for harnessing natural forces such as wind energy in an age which is very conscious of the environmental effects of burning fossil fuels, and where sustainability is an ethical norm. Therefore, the focus is currently on both the adequacy of long-term energy supply, as well as the environmental implications of particular sources. In that regard, the near certainty of costs being imposed on carbon dioxide emissions in developed countries has profoundly changed the economic outlook of clean energy sources. Wind turbines have vastly been developed in recent decades due to technology becoming more advanced. Since there is a continuous exhaustion of fossil fuels, it is of high interest with government encouragement to utilise wind technology. Wind turbines are currently advancing into cross-flow vertical axis operation, whereby research has shown a significant increase in performance compared to existing technologies. The need for sustainable energy sources becomes greater each year due to the continued depletion of fossil fuels and the resulting energy crisis. Solutions to this problem are potentially in the form of wind turbines, for sustainable urban environment, that have been receiving increased support. At present, a number of wind turbines have been developed that show significant increase in performance compared to existing technologies.

Funding

Please see our Research Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Our standard University deadlines apply. Please see our Deadlines for Applications page to find out more.

Supervisors

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Outline

The provision of cost-effective systems for meeting the distributed electricity generation needs is one of the research and innovation challenges. Here, one of the key requirements is the development of systems that would work for prolonged periods of time without the need of frequent maintenance, and ideally would utilise renewable energy sources such as solar energy. One of the possible technical solutions is the application of the novel emerging technology, with a significant future potential, referred to as “Thermoacoustic Technology”. This offers efficient energy conversion mechanisms without the need for any moving parts. This project will investigate the provision of distributed electricity generation for either industrial or domestic applications by using the coupling between a solar power driven “thermoacoustic engine” (which produces high density acoustic energy out of a solar-thermal input) and an energy converter referred to as a "linear alternator" for producing electrical power from an acoustic input. In general, the underlying thermoacoustic effect relies on the energy transfer between a compressible fluid and a solid material in the presence of an acoustic wave, and produces energy conversion mechanisms similar to those present in Stirling cycles. However, a thermoacoustic cycle is realised without expensive hardware associated with classical Stirling devices. The project will utilise an existing experimental apparatus to demonstrate the application of solar energy input for producing the electrical output in realistic working conditions.

Funding

Please see our Research Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Our standard University deadlines apply. Please see our Deadlines for Applications page to find out more.

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

The proposed research aims at investigating the properties of heterogeneous mixtures which are common in many industries including chemical, oil and gas, pharmaceutical, minerals, food, biotechnology and others. Characterisation of such mixtures is crucial for controlling the industrial processes as well as ensuring high product quality. During the research, suitable non-invasive and on-line measurement techniques, based on the combination of electrical impedance spectroscopy and ultrasonic transmission, will be developed. In the first stage, design and laboratory studies leading to construction of robust sensors to facilitate measurements in a selection of industrially relevant situations will be conducted. The measurements will be validated using independent techniques. The second stage will focus on modelling the propagation of the sensing fields which interrogate the mixtures and their interaction with the dispersions. The modelling will be conducted using a commercial package, FEMLAB, and will lead to construction of mathematical models predicting the sensor behaviour. (Industrial relevance: chemical, bio-technology, process, petroleum, chemical, food and drink)

Funding

Please see our Research Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

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Supervisors

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Outline

Multi component and multiphase mixture flows take place through a number of industrial stems and contribute to a number of processes. Some practical examples of such flows are solid-liquid flow, solid-gas flow, solid-liquid-gas flow, oil - water flow etc. Some of the most common industries where these flows are encountered are Nuclear Industry, Mining Industry, and Chemical Industry etc. The operation, monitoring and control of these flows need detailed knowledge about the flow characteristics of individual components and individual phases. The problem becomes especially complex if the flows are taking place through complex geometries for example helical pipes, elbows valves etc. Through this project novel techniques will be developed to understand local flow features associated with individual components and phases and integrating this information to develop design tools/standards for these processes. The special computational/experimental techniques developed will enable quantification of interphase interaction mechanism. It is expected that the work carried out under this project will enable removal of empiricism embedded in design methodologies to a large extent. It will further allow development of methodologies to trouble free operation and energy use optimisation for such systems.

Funding

Please see our Research Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

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Supervisors

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Outline

A prilling tower is an integral part of any fertilizer plant. A hot fluid (normally urea) is sprayed from a nozzle at the top of the tower forming droplets of urea. These droplets fall under the action of gravity, releasing their energy content, and hence, forming solid prills of urea, which is extensively used as a fertilizer. It is often seen that a lot of the prills formed at the base of the tower doesn't have enough strength to remain in the form of a prill; hence, they disintegrate into powder, wasting an excessive amount of the product. This happens because of ineffective cooling in the tower. The current research work will look into the dynamic of vortex rings for effective cooling purposes within a prilling tower. Vortex rings are inherent in nature and have been a topic of interest for almost a millennium. The urge to utilise vortex rings for multi-purpose applications, such as in cooling of urea droplets in a prilling tower, has led to the development of various types of vortex rings. However, in-depth analysis of the flow phenomena associated with vortex rings is still very little known. This study will investigate the dynamics of a vortex ring's generation, propagation and its ultimate dissipation within a prilling tower. The effect of the geometrical, flow and fluid parameters on the rolling—upof the fluid's shear layers will be analysed using a number of analytical, experimental and numerical techniques. It is expected that this study will result into a practical device that can be installed on the top of the prilling tower, which can enhance the cooling process, hence substantially reducing the waste powder.

Funding

Please see our Research Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

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Supervisors

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Outline

Previous work shows that application of an array of synthetic jet actuators, embedded within wing’s lading edges, leads to a significant alteration (reduction) to the buffet excitation levels on the suction side of swept wings arising from the vortex breakdown. While this effect has been extensively documented, little is known about the underlying fluid mechanical processes. It has been hypothesised that the coherent vorticity originating from the orifices of the synthetic jets becomes rolled up within the leading edge vortices and interacts with large scale coherent structures originating from the vortex burst, so that the vortex filaments become kinked and dissipate more quickly than in an un-actuated wing. The proposed project aims at unravelling the flow physics behind these processes by investigating the propagation of coherent structures in the post-breakdown region (in both actuated and un-actuated situation) using either the optical flow diagnostics tool such as flow visualisation, LDA and PIV and/or CFD codes such as Fluent. (Industrial relevance: aerospace)

Funding

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Deadline

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Supervisors

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Outline

In recorded and mixed form, the history of metal music has involved a broad focus on achieving greater heaviness (Berger & Fales 2005). Importantly though, there is a broad lack of detailed understanding of what heaviness actually is. Changes in performance approaches (especially performance speed), levels of down-tuning - and aspects such as design developments in guitar and bass amplifiers - have impacted our perceptions of heaviness. However, regardless of how these characteristics might or might not inform a given production, a valuable parameter of effective heaviness is clarity. “Sonic clarity can enhance the energy, intensity and impact of each and every sound in a metal production, collectively strengthening the power and drive of the music’s rhythm structures.” Mynett, 2016. With this in mind, by focussing on the mix stage of the music production process, this project sets out to gain a detailed understanding of the correlation between heaviness and clarity.

Funding

Please see our Research Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

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Supervisors

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Outline

This project addresses fundamental challenges of designing and optimising heat exchangers to be applied in the oscillatory flow conditions. These types of conditions are common in devices such as Stirling engines/coolers or thermoacoustic engines/refrigerators or air conditioning systems. The former is often found in cryogenics applications, the latter could be used as low-cost and low-maintenance technology for solar-driven power generation or air conditioning in the Middle-East. A common feature of such applications is a cyclic flow reversal and the associated hydrodynamic energy transfer, which is an integral part of the underlying thermodynamic cycle. In the classic heat exchanger analysis, the heat transfer correlations are derived for steady flows, but unfortunately these correlations do not work for oscillatory flows and so there is a gap in understanding the heat transfer (and fluid flow) processes and lack of reliable design guidelines. This project will focus on a mixture of experimental and modelling approaches to tackle these issues.

Funding

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Deadline

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Supervisors

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Outline

Most polymers are limited in their scope of use as a replacement for metals due to the differences in material properties such as strength, thermal expansion, creep, brittleness etc. In order to achieve the required properties, the components need to be redesigned to take the different material properties into account. To allow accurate design analysis, these properties need to be characterised and suitable mathematical models defined. The project will include characterisation of materials with suitable bulk properties to include the variable properties which can be used to improve the performance of the end product, such as polymer chain or reinforcing strand alignment. If a suitable constitutive model is not available, then the relevant mathematical modelling will need to be undertaken to provide the basis for design analysis. This will need to take into account the proposed manufacturing method, which may have influences on the final localised properties of the material. The models developed can then be used to design components which will be tested under typical operating conditions to validate their suitability for replacement of metal components. The student will need a thorough understanding of polymeric materials and non-linear modelling techniques, and preferably some experience of test methodologies.

Funding

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Deadline

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Supervisors

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Outline

This project is in the area of Thermoacoustic Technologies that deal with designing engines and refrigerators (heat pumps) with no moving parts. In refrigerators, an acoustic wave present in a thermoacoustic stack (or regenerator), which can be imagined as a series of narrow passages, imposes pressure and velocity oscillations, with a relative phase difference, enabling the compressible fluid to undergo a thermodynamic cycle similar to the Stirling cycle. This, coupled with appropriately phased heat absorption and release, enables “pumping” heat from the cooler to the hotter end of the stack (or regenerator) with no need for cranks, sliding seals or excess weight normally associated with conventional Stirling machines. A reverse process of establishing an acoustic wave due to the strong temperature gradients in the stack (regenerator) forms a basis for the operation of “thermoacoustic engines” – the useful acoustic power being extracted by the appropriate linear alternators. The aim of this project is to utilise the thermoacoustic principles described above in the design of a miniature thermoacoustic coolers that would be used for localised cooling of electronic components, such as for example computer processors.

Funding

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Deadline

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Supervisors

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Outline

Infrastructure systems consist of a number of sub-systems carrying a wide variety of solid-liquid-gaseous materials. Failure of one of the sub-systems may result in release of these materials in an uncontrolled manner. Risk mitigation strategies need to be designed keeping variety of leak scenarios. Furthermore, an array of sensors is needed to provide dispersion characteristics through a well-developed formulation. The information provided through such methods is limited in scope and accuracy in the present work a CFD based solution algorithm will be developed that integrates pre-developed flow scenarios with sensor array information to provide qualitative and quantitative pollutant dispersion characteristics. The developed system will be capable of informing real time pollution dispersion characteristics and will help in developing risk mitigation strategies.

Funding

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Deadline

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Supervisors

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Outline

This research aims at tackling the current challenges in AM by introducing novel in-process optical sensing tools for dynamic surface measurement, and real-time data analysis methods for surface assessment. A fast 3D fringe projection system with the ability to achieve simultaneous 3D shape acquisition, reconstruction and display in real time will be developed and implemented for in-process AM process. These innovations could advance fundamental understanding of AM processes, and ultimately lead to systematic tools to control the end-product performance of AM.

The main objectives of this proposed research are: 1) develop dynamic optical sensing system that acquires 3D topography for in-process AM. 2) achieve real-time 3D reconstruction by developing novel computational methods including using advanced graphics-processing unit (GPU). 3) develop novel methods for system calibration and surface reconstruction methods to achieve desired measurement accuracy. 4) develop real-time surface quality assessment method for AM process surface characterization. 5) system verification, validation and experimental study.

Funding

Please see our Research Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

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Supervisors

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Outline

This project relates to the physics of multiphase flows, which are a common occurrence in many industries such as nuclear, chemical, petroleum, minerals or food (some of the examples being gas/oil flows in crude oil extraction processes or steam/water flow in helical heat exchangers). On the fundamental level, the project will attempt to study various flow regimes present in gas-liquid system, in a purpose built flow rig, with particular attention to flows in inclined pipelines. These are still not very well understood as most of the existing work relates to vertical and horizontal configurations. The techniques used to interrogate the flow may include high-speed video, pressure drop measurements, optical (LDA, PIV), electrical (capacitance/resistance) or ultrasonics. It is hoped that this will provide a detailed classification of the flow patterns associated with various flow conditions, fluid properties and pipeline inclinations. On the engineering level, the project will aim at developing criterial correlations, which could be used in future in the design process of industrial installations. In its basic form, the project will suit either mechanical, chemical/process/petroleum or nuclear engineering graduates, that is those who had exposure to thermo-fluids and measurement problems during their undergraduate studies. The problem may be suitably modified to accommodate also IT, signal processing and instrumentation engineers, by taking the focus off the flow itself, and instead contributing to the development of methodologies for flow pattern recognition, measurement and signal processing. (Industrial relevance: petroleum, energy sector, chemical)

Funding

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Deadline

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Supervisors

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Outline

In this project the use of aerodynamic bearings to support the rotor shaft in automotive turbochargers will be investigated. The proposed bearing is supported by a metal foil structure when the shaft rotation is insufficient to generate the aerodynamic forces required to make the bearing self-supporting. The project will include:

• Investigation of the operational requirements for automotive turbocharger rotor bearings comprising load, stiffness and damping characteristics, operating conditions including temperature, shaft speed, gas and inertial loading and importantly, bearing and shaft sizes.

•Development of the multi-physics numerical models required to simulate the aerodynamic effect, the interaction of the generated air film with the metal foil support structure and the damping characteristics provided by friction between the components of the foil support structure.

•Generation of experimental data to validate the numerical models including the design and manufacture of a bearing test rig.

•Production of characteristic load, stiffness and damping curves for foil backed aerodynamic bearings using the validated numerical model.

•Use of a constrained optimization approach to identify the range of feasible bearing designs for automotive applications.

•Modification of an existing hydrodynamic turbocharger bearing housing to use an example aerodynamic bearing and demonstrate the bearing’s feasibility on an engine test bed.

Funding

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Deadline

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Supervisors

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Outline

The project aims at conducting a fundamental study of fluid mechanical and heat transfer processes occurring in stacks/regenerators and heat exchangers of thermoacoustic devices. In thermoacoustic devices, a standing/travelling acoustic wave causes the compressible fluid to undergo a thermodynamic cycle very similar to the Stirling cycle. This can potentially be utilised in constructing the next generation of reliable and energy efficient prime movers, refrigerators or heat pumps, without moving parts and using environmentally friendly inert gasses as working fluids. Unfortunately, the correct analysis of the thermoacoustic devices is hindered by the lack of understanding of the fluid mechanics and heat transfer processes which are profoundly affected by the transient and three-dimensional nature of the oscillating compressible flow and its interactions with physical boundaries. The proposed research will focus on investigating these complex phenomena in a purpose-built experimental apparatus, using a range of measurement techniques including Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF), Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) and hot and cold-wire measurements, in order to determine the flow characteristics inside representative components of a thermoacoustic device. This work will be complemented by numerical studies where the transport coefficients obtained from experiments can be used to enhance the numerical models of the fluid behaviour to benefit future design procedures. (Industrial relevance: power generation, heat ventilation and air conditioning, refrigeration, manufacturing)

Funding

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Deadline

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Supervisors

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Outline

Three-dimensional (3D) sensing for specular objects is required in many applications in research and industry. And most of the surfaces are high precision, inconvenient to measure. A practical method to measure specular surfaces is phase measurement deflectometry. Traditional deflectometry has been used as a 3D object reconstruction method for surfaces with weak (i.e., large radius of curvature) convex or concave surfaces. A full aperture optical surface test of a general convex surface has not been achieved.The proposed research project aims to develop an infinitive multi-sensor deflectometry system for general convex or freeform specular surface measurement. The proposed project will be able to measure the full aperture of convex surfaces. You are expected to develop new calibration methods and algorithms as well as the phase calculation algorithms for the infinitive multi-sensor deflectometry.

Funding

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Deadline

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Supervisors

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Outline

Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is a physical vapour deposition technique used to deposit thin films (<100nm) of material. PLD has been expanding rapidly since the early 1990s owing to the relatively simple conceptual set-up, the high deposition rate and the ability to deposit materials with complex stoichiometry. In PLD, a pulsed laser is used to remove (ablate) material from a target which produces a plume of plasma that flows from the target surface. This plume of material is then deposited on a substrate a short distance away where it forms a thin film. These thin films are subsequently used in a range of applications including compound semiconductors, dielectrics, ferroelectrics, electro-optic oxides, high-temperature superconductors and heterostructure (layered crystalline) materials.

The overall aim of this project is to develop a novel method of pulsed laser deposition, X-PLD (eXtreme ultraviolet Pulsed Laser Deposition), and to demonstrate the capability of this new technology by improving the efficiency of the transparent conducting oxide (TCO) layer in solar cells. The proposed technique exploits a capillary discharge laser system operating in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV). The effectiveness of this technique will be demonstrated by depositing metal oxide thin films used as TCOs in solar cells and comparing these thin films with those generated using existing technology. The medium energy ion scattering (MEIS) facility, unique in the UK and situated at the University of Huddersfield, will be used as the primary analytical tool for this project.

Funding

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Deadline

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Supervisors

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Outline

Additive manufacturing (AM) is expected to have a profound impact on the way manufacturers make almost any product. It has already made transformation improvements to productivity and opportunity exists to go further. Surfaces generated by AM methods are normally complex and high dynamic in terms of surface reflection and diffusion. Currently 3D vision, photogrammetry, fringe projection and deflectometry are widely used for surface shape measurement. However due to complex of the AM processed surfaces none of the above mentioned method can satisfy the demand of the AM processed surface measurement. A multi-sensor intelligent measurement system for 3D high dynamic complex surface measurement is proposed. The system combines fringe projection, photogrammetry and deflectometry system to tackle the difficult of high dynamic and complex surface shape measurement. You are expected to: 1) develop the calibration methods for the system 2) develop artificial intelligent methods to select the best measurement system according the surface under test
3) develop data fusion algorithms to combine the data sets from multi sensors 4) verification of the measurement results and the multi-sensor measurement system

Funding

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Deadline

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Outline

This exciting project is for clean energy passionate candidates, as it will develop design and control methods for microgrid (neighborhoods) and Nano-girds (fully electrified large buildings). The project will consider the integration of 100% green generation mix supported by different energy storage technologies. The project will consider the feasibility of both the technical and economic dimensions of these energy systems. The candidate is expected to publish the developed solutions and the obtained results in top tier journals and conferences.

Funding

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Deadline

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Supervisors

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Outline

Future generations of nuclear reactors will require advanced materials which can withstand the extreme conditions anticipated in such systems. These include elevated temperatures, high neutron fluxes and corrosive environments. Such materials are being developed around the world but need testing to assess their suitability and require investigating to understand the nature and driving mechanisms behind the micro-structural changes they will experience whilst in-service.

One way to rapidly-test candidate materials is to use ion beams which do not incur the hazards, costs and delays associated with neutron irradiation. Transmission electron microscopy allows the internal micro-structure of materials to be explored as changes on this scale determine the performance of materials at the macroscopic level of nuclear reactor components. The Microscopes and Ion Accelerators for Materials Investigations (MIAMI) facility at the University of Huddersfield combines these two techniques to allow the real-time observation of the dynamic evolution of radiation damage in materials under simulated nuclear reactor conditions. Being one of only a dozen such facilities globally which are able to perform such experiments provides unique opportunities for scientific discovery.

This PhD project offers the opportunity to use the unique capabilities of MIAMI to undertake research into novel nuclear materials produced in-house at the University of Huddersfield and also developed by our global network of academic and industrial partners.

Funding

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Deadline

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Supervisors

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Outline

Radiation damage in nanostructures is an area of intense scientific research with applications in many areas. For example: the response of semiconductor nanowires to irradiation used to engineer such structures as well as to that experienced when in-service in extreme conditions; the design of radiation-hard nanoporous nuclear materials which derive their resistance from their high surface-to-volume ratios; and the understanding of radiation effects in nanoparticles exposed to extra-terrestrial environments to explore the evolution of the cosmos.

The processes behind radiation damage in materials are both complex and dynamic. Therefore, to gain fundamental insights into these phenomena and the mechanisms which drive them, it is invaluable to be able to observe the changes in real-time at the nanoscale at which they occur. The Electron Microscopy and Materials Analysis (EMMA) Research Group at the University of Huddersfield specialises in the investigation of radiation damage in materials using transmission electron microscopy with in situ ion irradiation which allows exactly this type of experiment to be performed.

The successful applicant will have the opportunity to use the Microscopes and Ion Accelerators for Materials Investigations (MIAMI-1 and MIAMI-2) facilities at the University of Huddersfield which combine transmission electron microscopes with ion beam systems to allow in situ studies of radiation damage effects at the nanoscale. MIAMI-1 has a track record of research in nanostructures including graphene, gold nanorods, nanodiamonds and semiconductor nanowires. The new MIAMI-2 has recently been completed with £3.5M funding from the United Kingdom’s Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) and is a state-of-the-art facility with world-leading experimental capabilities. The PhD candidate appointed to this fully-funded studentship will have the opportunity to work alongside colleagues on existing projects on nanostructures to develop their skills and knowledge before choosing the specific area in which they are most interested in pursuing for their own research.

Funding

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Outline

In all FSI problems, a structure subsystem and a fluid based subsystem are coupled together and the resultant characteristics of the combined coupled system are different from each individual subsystem. Sometimes, in numerical simulation of FSI problems, the system is broken down into a fluid simulation subsystem and a structural dynamic subsystem, and the coupling between these two subsystems is maintained by a feedback/feedforward communication algorithm. There are several limitations of numerical simulation of either subsystems in FSI problems, and hence sometimes it is necessary to carry on experiments. However, setting up a complete FSI test platform is expensive or sometimes is impossible due to the size/equipment limitations or nonlinearities involved in either subsystems. Therefore, it is possible to use hybrid testing to overcome the difficulties of a full FSI test or to reduce the cost of testing. In this project a simple real-time FSI problem is considered as a combination of a vibrating structure with a fluid flow affecting the structure response. The interaction between these two subsystems will be maintained using properly located actuators. The project aims to address the challenges and critical technical problems of a real-time hybrid FSI testing, and shed light for designing a novel real-time hybrid testing platform for flexible structures.

Funding

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Deadline

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Outline

The aim of this project is to provide a robust methodology for simulating the interaction between failed wheels in turbochargers and the housings designed to contain them. The project will require the use of advanced numerical simulation techniques and the acquisition of validation data by experimental means. The project will include:

•Investigation of the mechanical properties of wheel and housing materials over the range of typical operating temperatures.

•Development of a data bank of burst wheel configurations (i.e. size and shape of fragments) together with wheel speed and materials. This will be based on historical data held at Huddersfield.

•Expansion of the wheel failure data bank based on continued wheel testing.

•Development of experimental techniques to record the burst event and capture wheel fragments following burst to prevent secondary damage.

•Development of finite element models to simulate impact of the wheel fragments with the turbocharger housing. These models will allow for fragments of a range of sizes and shapes, a range of wheel speeds and variable relative position of fragments and housing features at the moment of burst.

•Use of the finite element models combined with stochastic analysis to determine the probability of worst case scenarios occurring.

Funding

Please see our Research Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Our standard University deadlines apply. Please see our Deadlines for Applications page to find out more.

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

The aim of the research work is to develop an inverse design methodology to develop a unique surface profile for a required functional performance (flow behaviour) and hence it will involve development of an algorithm to generate surface profiles from geometrical parameters characterising the surface as well as develop molecular flow model for flow near the wall surface having artificially created roughness and establish quantitative dependence of surface parameters with flow features very close to the wall. Furthermore development of computational fluid dynamic simulations (continuum based) for flow over wall surface and establish quantitative dependence of surface roughness parameters with flow features away from the wall will be an essential part of this project.

Funding

Please see our Research Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Our standard University deadlines apply. Please see our Deadlines for Applications page to find out more.

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

This project is in the area of smart materials, one of the hot topics in the modern technology, and concerns the design of novel materials whose thermal characteristics could be controlled by varying the degree of geometrical anisotropy within complex/heterogeneous structures. The application of such materials is desirable in many situations including building insulation, automotive, electronics or defence. One simple arrangement for such smart materials is a suspension of disk-like particles in a liquid. Here, the modifier of system’s thermal properties could be an external field (electrical, magnetic), which could change particle orientation. Such structures could act as “shutters” for various heat transfer mechanisms (radiation, convection and conduction), or could be engineered in such a way that the ratio of one heat transfer mechanism to another could be controlled. The project aims at conducting numerical modelling of such materials in order to develop new concepts in controlling heat transfer processes. (Industrial relevance: energy, building and construction industries, defense)

Funding

Please see our Research Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Our standard University deadlines apply. Please see our Deadlines for Applications page to find out more.

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Traditional approaches to cooling/refrigeration/air conditioning are commonly based on vapour compression cycles that are driven by electrical input to the compressor. In the age of “environmental sustainability” these have major drawbacks of using as working fluids chemicals that are harmful to the environment and draining the electricity that in some instances may be in short supply. This project will investigate the provision of cooling/refrigeration/air conditioning capabilities for either industrial or domestic applications by using the coupling between solar power driven thermoacoustic engine and a thermoacoustic cooler. Thermoacoustic technologies utilised here are one of the emerging energy technologies with a significant future potential for providing cost-effective thermodynamic conversion processes. Thermoacoustic effect relies on the energy transfer between a compressible fluid and a solid material in the presence of an acoustic wave and thus allowing for the construction of thermodynamic machines with no moving parts.

Funding

Please see our Research Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Our standard University deadlines apply. Please see our Deadlines for Applications page to find out more.

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

This project relates to unsteady aerodynamics of swept wings and in particular addresses a challenging problem of the breakdown of leading-edge vortices. Vortex breakdown degrades the aircraft’s aerodynamic performance and induces flow field unsteadiness related to its varying location relative to the wing, interaction between port side and starboard side vortex breakdown regions, and generation of large-scale coherent structures causing significant aerodynamic loading. Current hypothesis is that the appearance of vortex breakdown is related to the overall balance of vorticity and the limited ability of the coherent vortex to convect the axial component of vorticity in the downstream direction. As the amount of vorticity continually increases, there comes a point when the excess vorticity can only be convected if the vortex structure changes. The proposed work will address these fundamental issues through wind tunnel experiments on a delta wing model using non-intrusive optical instrumentation and measurements of unsteady surface pressure. (Industrial relevance: aerospace)

Funding

Please see our Research Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Our standard University deadlines apply. Please see our Deadlines for Applications page to find out more.

Supervisors

How to apply

We offer supervision to PhD level in a wide range of areas where we are carrying out state of the art research.

The School of Computing and Engineering has three institutes and a number of research centres and groups that cover a diverse range of topics within Mechanical and Electronic Engineering:

[*] [Institute of Railway Research|http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/researchcentres/irr/]

[*] [Turbocharger Research Institute|http://www.hud.ac.uk/tri/]

[*] [Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Advanced Metrology|http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/researchcentres/cimam/]

[*] [Institute for Accelerator Applications|http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/researchcentres/iiaa/]

[*] [Centre for Efficiency and Performance Engineering|http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/researchcentres/cepe/]

[*] [Centre for Precision Technologies|http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/researchcentres/cpt/]

[*] [Adaptive Music Technologies Research Group|http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/researchcentres/amtrg/]

[*] [Energy, Emissions and the Environment Group|http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/researchcentres/eeerg/]

[*] [Condition Monitoring and Diagnosis Group|http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/researchcentres/cmdg/]

[*] [Measurement and Data Analysis Group|http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/researchcentres/mdag/]

[*] [Electron Microscopy and Materials Analysis Group|http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/researchcentres/emma/]

[*] [Automotive and Marine Engineering Research Group|http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/researchcentres/ameg/]

[*] [Music Technology and Production Research Group|http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/researchcentres/mtprg/]

[*] [Systems Engineering Research Group|http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/researchcentres/serg/]

To find out more about the research we conduct, take a look at our Research, Innovation and Skills webpages, where you will find information on each research area. To find out about our staff visit ‘Our experts’ which features profiles of all our academic staff.

Researcher Environment

The University of Huddersfield has a thriving research community made up of over 1,350 postgraduate research students. We have students studying on a part-time and full-time basis from all over the world with around 43% from overseas and 57% from the UK.

Research plays an important role in informing all our teaching and learning activities. Through undertaking research our staff remain up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, which means you develop knowledge and skills which are current and relevant to your specialist area.

[Find out more about our research staff and centres|http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/]

Student support

Tuition fees

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