Chemistry (MSc by Research)

2021-22

This course is eligible for Master's loan funding. Find out more.

Start date

1 October 2021

17 January 2022

25 April 2022

Duration

The maximum duration for a full-time MSc by Research is 1 year (12 months) or part-time is 2 years (24 months) with an optional submission pending (writing up period) of 4 months.

Sometimes it may be possible to mix periods of both full-time and part-time study.

If studying on a part-time basis, you must establish close links with the University and spend normally not less than an average of 10 working days per year in the university, excluding participation in activities associated with enrolment, re-registration and progression monitoring. You are also expected to dedicate 17.5 hours per week to the research.

Application deadlines

For PGR start date September 2021

02 July 2021

About the research degree

A Master's by Research (MSc) allows you to undertake a one year (full-time) research degree. It contains little or no formal taught component. This type of study gives you the chance to explore a research topic over a shorter time than a more in-depth doctoral programme.

Research Master's students choose a specific project to work on and have a greater degree of independence in their work than is the case with a taught Master’s course.

You’ll be expected to work to an approved programme which you will develop in conjunction with your supervisor within the first few months of starting your studies. Whilst undertaking the research project you will also have the opportunity to develop your research skills by taking part in training courses and events.

At the end of the project you write up your findings in the form of a short thesis of around 25,000 words, which will then be examined.

On successful completion, you will be awarded your degree and if you have enjoyed this taste of research you may then decide to apply for the full research doctoral degree (PhD).

You will be appointed a main supervisor who will normally be part of a supervisory team, comprising up to three members. The research supervisor will advise and support you on your project.

Entry requirements

The normal entry requirements for enrolment on a MSc by Research is an upper second honours degree (2.1) from a UK university or a qualification of an equivalent standard, in a discipline appropriate to that of the proposed programme to be followed.

If your first language is not English, you will need to meet the minimum requirements of an English Language qualification. The minimum for IELTS is 6.0 overall with the written element at least 6.0 with no element lower than 5.5, or equivalent will be considered acceptable. Read more about the University’s entry requirements for students outside of the UK on our Where are you from information pages.

Why choose Huddersfield?


There are many reasons to choose the University of Huddersfield and here are just five of them:

  1. We were named University of the Year by Times Higher Education in 2013.
  2. Huddersfield is the only University where 100% of permanent teaching staff are Fellows of the Higher Education Authority.
  3. Our courses have been accredited by 41 professional bodies.
  4. 94.6% of our postgraduate students go on to work and/or further study within six months of graduating.
  5. We have world-leading applied research groups in Biomedical Sciences, Engineering and Physical Sciences, Social Sciences and Arts and Humanities.

What can I research?

There are several research topics available for this degree. See below examples of research areas including an outline of the topics, the supervisor, funding information and eligibility criteria:

Outline

Small organic molecules are important in drug discovery and in novel materials research. The development of sustainable syntheses to these compounds using small organic molecules as catalysts is an important area of research. The aim of this project is to develop new iodoarene catalysts, especially chiral variants, and investigate their utility in the formation of small organic molecules.

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of £6,000 per annum are required.

Deadline

Our standard University deadlines apply. Please see our Deadlines for Applications page to find out more.

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

The nature of fabric manufacture can cause fabric producers to enforce long lead times and large minimum orders on their customers, making it difficult to produce bespoke fabrics in limited quantities. The research programme will be directed at materials development in one or more of the following areas: polymer development, textile functionalisation, and stratified fabric production. In addition to process development and characterisation, this project will design new or adapt existing fabric manufacturing processes and establish underpinning structure-property relationships.

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of between £3-£15,000 per annum are required depending on the nature of the project.

Deadline

Our standard University deadlines apply. Please see our Deadlines for Applications page to find out more.

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Blood flow is severely restricted in the periphery compartments of a tumour biomass, cells in these regions live under hypoxic conditions with limited availability of glucose sugars. What is not clear is if these cells are able to recycle sugars from the surface of dead and lysing cells and, if so, if mannose can be recycled from surface glycans for use as a carbon feed. In this research project, we are proposing to investigate the role of mannose metabolism within hypoxic cancer cells. A number of enzymes are involved in the uptake and transformation of mannose including MPI (phosphomannose isomerase) which controls the flux between catabolism and glycan formation.

In this project we will follow kinetic features of mannose metabolism within a variety of cancer cell lines, under both aerobic and hypoxic conditions. We will investigate the levels of production of MPI using classical activity measurements where the rate of transformation of mannose-6-phosphate to fructose 6-phosphate will be studied. We will use a range of analytical procedures, including both HPAEC-PAD and NMR, to monitor the change in concentration of Mannose, Man-6-P and Fru-6-P as a function of time. In the latter stages of the programme we will study the effect of a range of simple sugar analogues as inhibitors of the catabolic pathway in an attempt to block the triple negative cancer cells from utilising mannose as a carbon feed.

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of between £3-£15,000 per annum are required depending on the nature of the project.

Deadline

Our standard University deadlines apply. Please see our Deadlines for Applications page to find out more.

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Biomedical materials engineering develops biomaterials that are manufactured to be suitable for use as medical devices. Nanomaterials of oxides, metals, carbon-based materials (i.e. graphene, nanotubes, etc.), and polymers make up the vast majority of biomaterials. For practical uses (sensors, biosensors, nanozymes etc.) nanomaterials are usually chemically modified at the surface forming composite materials. Unlike, the bulk properties of these materials which are generally well known, the properties arising at the nanoscale from surfaces and interfaces in contact to the biological environment are peculiar to the system. The chemistry of surfaces and interfaces and their characterization are therefore key to a quantitative understanding of the materials properties. Controlling such properties is imperative to allow for the prediction of the materials behaviour when immerse in the biological environment. This will not only affect biomedical processes at the materials interfaces but also any industrial and technological applications that see such systems at the heart of their approaches. The PhD student will undertake novel research using multiscale computational approaches capable of gaining nanoscale and microscale insights into the chemistry, structure and processes at the surfaces and interfaces of biomedically relevant materials. The details of the project will be discussed with the candidate and the project will be tailored based on the candidate’s research interest. All research outputs: https://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=jAUrSBQAAAAJ&hl=en Examples of research outputs for this PhD are listed below: Computer-Aided Design of Nanoceria Structures as Enzyme Mimetic Agents: The Role of Bodily Electrolytes on Maximising Their Activity. https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acsabm.8b00709 Strongly Bound Surface Water Affects the Shape Evolution of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles https://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/acs.jpcc.9b09046 Thermodynamic Evolution of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticle Morphology Using Carbon Dioxide https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acs.jpcc.0c07437

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of between £3-£15,000 per annum are required depending on the nature of the project.

Deadline

Our standard University deadlines apply. Please see our Deadlines for Applications page to find out more

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Textile wet processing is currently an important aspect of textile production as it adds value to the textiles by improving aesthetics, comfort and functional properties. However, wet processing consumes substantial volumes of water and chemicals, which frequently have associated health and/or environmental hazards, and subsequently produce high quantities of effluent requiring expensive dilution and/or treatment. This research will investigate alternative dry finishing processes that can offer lower costs, reduced environmental impact, and the potential to produce new products with improved performance. This research will incorporate materials development in one or more of the following areas: polymer development, colouration of textiles, textile functionalisation, and plasma treatment.

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of between £3-£15,000 per annum are required depending on the nature of the project.

Deadline

Our standard University deadlines apply. Please see our Deadlines for Applications page to find out more.

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

There are important key factors that have to be considered when studying nuclear materials. (1) An important challenge is the modelling of transport properties in polycrystalline materials, and hence at their interfaces and grain boundaries. Most interfaces are not pristine and dopants and fission products are likely to segregate, thus impacting the transport properties at the grain boundary. In this PhD, we will use atomistic simulations to model the effect of grain boundaries on the transport properties of actinide oxides. (2) Important challenges when studying the corrosion of actinides oxides is the effect of the environment on the surfaces of the materials. Indeed, radiolytic corrosion of actinide materials represent an issue for the long-term storage and disposal of nuclear materials. To be able to understand how surface composition affect the rate of radiolysis and corrosion, we will be using molecular modelling to predict surface composition at relevant conditions of temperature and pressure. By mapping the energetics of the interactions, we can calculate temperature of desorption and predict nanoparticle morphology of actinides oxides. The PhD student will undertake novel research using multiscale computational approaches capable of gaining nanoscale and microscale insights into the chemistry, structure and processes at the surfaces and interfaces of materials for nuclear applications. The details of the project will be discussed with the candidate and the project will be tailored based on the candidate’s research interest. All research outputs: https://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=jAUrSBQAAAAJ&hl=en Examples of research outputs for this PhD are listed below: The energetics of carbonated PuO2 surfaces affects nanoparticle morphology: a DFT+U study. https://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2020/cp/d0cp00021c Defect segregation facilitates oxygen transport at fluorite UO2 grain boundaries. https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rsta.2019.0026 The critical role of hydrogen on the stability of oxy-hydroxyl defect clusters in uranium oxide. https://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2018/TA/C8TA02817F Computer simulation of defect clusters in UO2 and their dependence on composition. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022311514006849

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of between £3-£15,000 per annum are required depending on the nature of the project.

Deadline

Our standard University deadlines apply. Please see our Deadlines for Applications page to find out more

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

There are important key factors that have to be considered when studying energy materials. (1) An important challenge is the modelling of transport properties in polycrystalline materials, and hence at their interfaces and grain boundaries. Most interfaces are not pristine and dopants are likely to segregate, thus impacting the transport properties at the grain boundary. In fluorite-based materials as dopants accumulate at the grain boundaries so do oxygen vacancies, which blocks transport of oxygen across the interface. This is known as the “grain boundary blocking effect” in the space charge theory. However, as the segregation behaviour is highly dependent on the grain boundary there is scope to control the transport properties at the interface. In this PhD, we will use atomistic simulations to model the effect of grain boundaries on the transport properties of energy oxide materials. (2) Surface morphology is known to affect catalytic activity. Here one of the key challenges is to identify strategies to enhance the expression of such surfaces and also to prevent their disappearance over time. To understand how surface composition affect the surface catalysis, we will be using molecular modelling to predict surface composition at relevant conditions of temperature and pressure. By mapping the energetics of the interactions, we can calculate temperature of desorption and predict nanoparticle morphology of catalytically relevant oxides. The PhD student will undertake novel research using multiscale computational approaches capable of gaining nanoscale and microscale insights into the chemistry, structure and processes at the surfaces and interfaces of materials for energy generation and catalysis. The details of the project will be discussed with the candidate and the project will be tailored based on the candidate’s research interest. All research outputs: https://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=jAUrSBQAAAAJ&hl=en Examples of research outputs for this PhD are listed below: Controlling the {111}/{110} surface Ratio of Cuboidal Ceria Nanoparticles. https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acsami.8b21667 The role of dopant segregation on the oxygen vacancy distribution and oxygen diffusion in CeO2 grain boundaries. https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/2515-7655/ab28b5 Thermodynamic Evolution of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticle Morphology Using Carbon Dioxide https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acs.jpcc.0c07437 Concurrent La and A-Site Vacancy Doping Modulates the Thermoelectric Response of SrTiO3: Experimental and Computational Evidence. https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acsami.7b14231 Structural, Electronic, and Transport Properties of Hybrid SrTiO3-Graphene and Carbon Nanoribbon Interfaces. https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acs.chemmater.7b02253 Structural, electronic and thermoelectric behaviour of CaMnO3 and CaMnO(3− δ). https://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2014/ta/c4ta01514b

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of between £3-£15,000 per annum are required depending on the nature of the project.

Deadline

Our standard University deadlines apply. Please see our Deadlines for Applications page to find out more

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

This research will be in the area of synthetic organic chemistry and will focus specifically on the synthesis of heterocyclic natural products. The targets of this project are the indolizidine and pyrrolizidine alkaloids. These systems are of interest in the possible treatment of various diseases such as cancer, diabetes and viral infections such as AIDS, and some of them have the potential to function as potent analgesics or as potential treatments for Alzheimer’s disease and other neurological disorders. Examples of such compounds include the well-known "poison frog alkaloids".

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of £6,000 per annum are required.

Deadline

Our standard University deadlines apply. Please see our Deadlines for Applications page to find out more.

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

This topic is in the area of synthetic organic chemistry used to target heterocyclic products with medicinal applications. The heterocyclic targets include pyrrolo-fused natural products such as the pyrrolobenzodiazepines and their sulfur analogues, beta-sultams, homotropanes, isoflavones, oxadiazoles and aza-sugars. The biological activities that we are interested in include anti-tumour compounds, antibiotics and anti-inflammatory compounds that target diseases such as Alzheimer's.

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of between £3-£15,000 per annum are required depending on the nature of the project.

Deadline

Our standard University deadlines apply. Please see our Deadlines for Applications page to find out more.

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

We are involved in research programmes with cancer biologists that require the preparation of novel molecules for testing. This includes the development of synthetic methodology to prepare potential drugs containing fluorescent tags and antibody conjugates.

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of £xx per annum are required.

Deadline

Our standard University deadlines apply. Please see our Deadlines for Applications page to find out more.

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Silicon is the second most abundant element on Earth however its synthetic chemistry has been little studied compared to its close neighbour carbon. The aim of this project is to develop new synthetic methods to access silicon heterocycles. These types of compounds are becoming of increasing interest in drug discovery.

Funding

Self-funding applicants are welcome. In addition to tuition fees, bench fees of £6,000 per annum are required.

Deadline

Our standard University deadlines apply. Please see our Deadlines for Applications page to find out more.

Supervisors

How to apply

All major areas of chemistry are covered with areas of strength including: • synthetic organic chemistry • physical organic chemistry • carbohydrates, proteins and enzyme chemistry • organometallic and supramolecular chemistry • heterogeneous catalysis and adsorption • thermal methods of analysis and synthesis • materials chemistry

To find out more about the research we conduct, take a look at our Research, Innovation and Skills webpages, where you will find information on each research area. To find out about our staff visit ‘Our experts’ which features profiles of all our academic staff.

You will need to complete a research proposal outlining your areas of interest and when this is submitted along with your research degree application form we will look for the academics within the University who have the expertise and knowledge to supervise you and guide you through your research degree.

Student support

At the University of Huddersfield, you'll find support networks and services to help you get ahead in your studies and social life. Whether you study at undergraduate or postgraduate level, you'll soon discover that you're never far away from our dedicated staff and resources to help you to navigate through your personal student journey. Find out more about all our support services.

Researcher Environment

The University of Huddersfield has a thriving research community made up of over 1,350 postgraduate research students. We have students studying on a part-time and full-time basis from all over the world with around 43% from overseas and 57% from the UK.

Research plays an important role in informing all our teaching and learning activities. Through undertaking research our staff remain up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, which means you develop knowledge and skills which are current and relevant to your specialist area.

[Find out more about our research staff and centres|http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/]

Important information

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When you enrol as a student of the University, your study and time with us will be governed by a framework of regulations, policies and procedures, which form the basis of your agreement with us. These include regulations regarding the assessment of your course, academic integrity, your conduct (including attendance) and disciplinary procedure, fees and finance and compliance with visa requirements (where relevant). It is important that you familiarise yourself with these as you will be asked to agree to abide by them when you join us as a student. You will find a guide to the key terms here, along with the Student Protection Plan, where you will also find links to the full text of each of the regulations, policies and procedures referred to.

The Office for Students (OfS) is the principal regulator for the University.