History (MA by Research)

2021-22 (also available for 2022-23)

Start date

20 September 2021

17 January 2022

Duration

The maximum duration for a full-time MA by Research is 1 year (12 months) or part-time is 2 years (24 months) with an optional submission pending (writing up period) of 4 months.

Sometimes it may be possible to mix periods of both full-time and part-time study.

If studying on a part-time basis, you must establish close links with the University and spend normally not less than an average of 10 working days per year in the university, excluding participation in activities associated with enrolment, re-registration and progression monitoring. You are also expected to dedicate 17.5 hours per week to the research.

Application deadlines

For PGR start date September 2021

02 July 2021

About the research degree

The MA by Research is a one-year full time course of postgraduate study. Students taking this degree work on a specific project with expert supervision from a member of the Huddersfield History team. This project is written up as a dissertation of 25,000 words and submitted at the end of the year. Please see below for the MA by Research topics offered for supervision by Huddersfield historians.

MA by Research students also take part in a Graduate Seminar which provides a structured environment for postgraduate study as well as an opportunity for research students to get to know each other, and share ideas and findings.The Graduate Seminar aims to explore various ways of approaching and categorizing research; for example, organizing concepts like gender, class and identity; and investigates sources and approaches like material culture, oral history and memory. It also covers the practical skills required for effective research. To support the regular seminar there are additional specialist sessions delivered by experts who work on specific temporal areas and who use particular methodologies.

MA by Research students also play a full part in History at Huddersfield’s research culture by attending the regular departmental research seminar and other events like the Whitley and Luddite Lectures. The annual English Literature and History postgraduate conference, held every summer, is organised and run by MA by Research and doctoral students. This attracts students from other universities across the UK and provides an important opportunity for sharing research, networking and career development.

On successful completion, you will be awarded your degree and if you have enjoyed this taste of research you may then decide to apply for the full research doctoral degree (PhD).

I have a special interest in the nineteenth and twentieth century history of modern war, humanitarian aid and empire, and I am currently co-Ieading on the Emily Hobhouse Letters Project, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council. Emily Hobhouse (1860–1926), was a British peace activist and writer. Using her vast archive of letters and other writings, the Emily Hobhouse Letters project is uncovering her contribution to international peace and humanitarianism. This includes her work in Germany following the First World War and her role in South African politics. It is a collaborative project, working with colleagues at other universities in the UK, as well as Switzerland and South Africa, and founded on shared interests in the history of relief work, women’s suffrage, internationalism and empire. Her newly-available archive provides a rich resource for postgraduate students wishing to pursue an interest in the history of humanitarianism and imperial politics.

None

Dr Rebecca Gill, Senior Lecturer in Modern History

Entry requirements

The normal entry requirements for enrolment on a MA by Research is an Honours degree (2:1 or above) or an equivalent professional qualification.

If your first language is not English, you will need to meet the minimum requirements of an English Language qualification. The minimum for IELTS is 6.0 overall with no element lower than 5.5, or equivalent will be considered acceptable. Read more about the University’s entry requirements for students outside of the UK on our Where are you from information pages.

What can I research?

According to REF2014, 100% of research produced by historians at Huddersfield is internationally recognised, and two thirds of this is internationally excellent or world-leading.We work together on projects within three key research themes which reflect our distinctive expertise and interests:

  • The material cultures of the medieval and early modern periods
  • The history of health, welfare and well-being
  • The co-production of historical research projects and outputs with non-academic partners.

Our research encompasses a wide range chronologically, geographically and conceptually. Spanning the Middle Ages to the modern day, Huddersfield’s historians are internationally acknowledged experts in the fields of oral history, gender history, health history, political history, digital history, religious history, social history, public history and battlefield archaeology. As individuals we are specialists in a variety of fields including topics such as the interaction between kingship and masculinity in the Middle Ages; social and cultural responses to mental illness in the 20th Century; the experience of children in Vichy France; the scientific culture of Nazi Germany; and the history of sexual, racial and cultural encounters between different national and ethnics groups in Britain during the Second World War.

To find out more about the research we conduct, take a look at our Research, Innovation and Skills webpages, where you will find information on each research area. To find out about our staff visitwhich ‘Our staff’ features profiles of all our academic staff.

In the first instance please contact the member of staff whose project/s interest you and they will advise you on the completion of a research proposal, which forms part of the application.

We also offer the following MA by Research pathways:

(MA by Research in Public History, Oral History and Community Heritage)[http://courses.hud.ac.uk/2018-19/full-time/postgraduate/public-history-oral-history-and-community-heritage-ma-by-research]

(Masters by Research in the History of Childhood)|http://courses.hud.ac.uk/2018-19/full-time/postgraduate/history-of-childhood-ma-by-research]

Student support

At the University of Huddersfield, you'll find support networks and services to help you get ahead in your studies and social life. Whether you study at undergraduate or postgraduate level, you'll soon discover that you're never far away from our dedicated staff and resources to help you to navigate through your personal student journey. Find out more about all our support services.

Researcher Environment

The University of Huddersfield has a thriving research community made up of over 1,350 postgraduate research students. We have students studying on a part-time and full-time basis from all over the world with around 43% from overseas and 57% from the UK.

Research plays an important role in informing all our teaching and learning activities. Through undertaking research our staff remain up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, which means you develop knowledge and skills which are current and relevant to your specialist area.

[Find out more about our research staff and centres|http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/]

Important information

We will always try to deliver your course as described on this web page. However, sometimes we may have to make changes as set out below.

When you are offered a place on a research degree, your offer will include confirmation of your supervisory team, and the topic you will be researching.

Whilst the University will use reasonable efforts to ensure your supervisory team remains the same, sometimes it may be necessary to make changes to your team for reasons outside the University’s control, for example if your supervisor leaves the University, or suffers from long term illness. Where this is the case, we will discuss these difficulties with you and seek to either put in place a new supervisory team, or help you to transfer to another research facility, in accordance with our Student Protection Plan.

Changes may also be necessary because of circumstances outside our reasonable control, for example the University being unable to access its buildings due to fire, flood or pandemic, or the University no longer being able to provide specialist equipment. Where this is the case, we will discuss these issues with you and agree any necessary changes.

Your research project is likely to evolve as you work on it and these minor changes are a natural and expected part of your study. However, we may need to make more significant changes to your topic of research during the course of your studies, either because your area of interest has changed, or because for reasons outside the University’s control we can no longer support your research. If this is the case, we will discuss any changes in topic with you and agree these in writing. If you are an international student, changing topics may affect your visa or ATAS clearance and if this is the case we will discuss this with you before any changes are agreed.

When you enrol as a student of the University, your study and time with us will be governed by the University’s Terms and Conditions and a framework of regulations, policies and procedures, which form the basis of your agreement with us. It is important that you familiarise yourself with these as you will be asked to agree to abide by them when you join us as a student. You will find a guide to the key terms here, along with the Student Protection Plan, where you will also find links to the full text of each of the regulations, policies and procedures referred to.

The Office for Students (OfS) is the principal regulator for the University.