Physics (PhD)

2021-22 (also available for 2022-23)

This course is eligible for Doctoral loan funding. Find out more.

Start date

1 October 2021

17 January 2022

25 April 2022

Duration

The maximum duration for a full-time PhD is 3 years (36 months) or part-time is 6 years (72 months) with an optional submission pending (writing up period) of 12 months.

Sometimes it may be possible to mix periods of both full-time and part-time study.

If studying on a part-time basis, you must establish close links with the University and spend normally not less than an average of 10 working days per year in the university, excluding participation in activities associated with enrolment, re-registration and progression monitoring. You are also expected to dedicate 17.5 hours per week to the research.

Application deadlines

For PGR start date September 2021

02 July 2021

About the research degree

A PhD is the highest academic award for which a student can be registered. This full-time, three year programme allows you to explore and pursue a research project built around a substantial piece of work, which has to show evidence of original contribution to knowledge.

A PhD is a programme of research, culminating in the production of a large-scale piece of written work in the form of a research thesis that should not normally exceed 80,000 words (excluding references and appendices).

Completing a PhD can give you a great sense of personal achievement and help you develop a high level of transferable skills which will be useful in your subsequent career, as well as contributing to the development of knowledge in your chosen field.

You are expected to work to an approved programme of study including appropriate programmes of postgraduate study (which may be drawn from parts of existing postgraduate courses, final year degree programmes, conferences, seminars, masterclasses, guided reading or a combination of study methods).

You will be appointed a main supervisor who will normally be part of a supervisory team, comprising up to three members to advise and support you on your project.

Entry requirements

The normal level of attainment required for entry is:

  • a Master's degree from a UK University or equivalent, in a discipline appropriate to the proposed programme to be followed, or
  • an upper second class honours degree (2:1) from a UK university in a discipline appropriate to that of the proposed programme to be followed, or
  • appropriate research or professional experience at postgraduate level, which has resulted in published work, written reports or other appropriate evidence of accomplishment.

If your first language is not English, you will need to meet the minimum requirements of an English Language qualification. The minimum for IELTS is 6.0 overall with no element lower than 5.5, or equivalent will be considered acceptable. Read more about the University’s entry requirements for students outside of the UK on our Where are you from information pages.

Why choose Huddersfield?


There are many reasons to choose the University of Huddersfield and here are just five of them:

  1. We were named University of the Year by Times Higher Education in 2013.
  2. Huddersfield is the only University where 100% of permanent teaching staff are Fellows of the Higher Education Authority.
  3. Our courses have been accredited by 41 professional bodies.
  4. 94.6% of our postgraduate students go on to work and/or further study within six months of graduating.
  5. We have world-leading applied research groups in Biomedical Sciences, Engineering and Physical Sciences, Social Sciences and Arts and Humanities.

What can I research?

There are several research topics available for this degree. See below examples of research areas including an outline of the topics, the supervisor, funding information and eligibility criteria:

Outline

The Large Hadron Collider at CERN is the largest and most important project in particle physics in the world. It is currently being upgraded to increase its potential for discovering new physics. This upgrade will increase the amount of beam in the accelerator. To make this possible, the accelerator collimation system must also be upgraded. This is a vital part of the accelerator that removes particles that would otherwise be lost from it and possibly cause damage to it. This upgrade will be very challenging.

The PhD will investigate new forms of collimation that would help to make this upgrade possible. It will involve the development of a software tool called Merlin, including comparisons with measurements made at CERN, and its use for studying and optimising the new collimation techniques.

The work will be done as part of an UKRI-STFC and CERN funded project and will include collaboration with the University of Manchester and CERN.

Funding

This is a fully funded project with the cost of tuition fees and an annual bursary (£15,285 in 2020/21) funded through the Science & Technology Facilities Council.

Deadline

Our standard University deadlines apply. Please see our Deadlines for Applications page to find out more.

Supervisors

How to apply

Our research is focused around two themes novel-materials and particle accelerators. We research and develop new approaches and methods to accelerator applications and materials development that will have a real impact on global grand challenges in areas such as the environment, health, security and energy.

There is a wide range of topics which can be researched, including the following areas: [] Artificial Electromagnetic Materials: designing and fabricating artificial materials, such as metamaterials and spatially dispersive media. To manipulate the interaction between charged particle beams and EM waves. [] Medium Energy Ion Scattering: probing the atomic composition of the first few layers with our accelerator system, which is part of the UK National Ion Beam Centre [*] Particle Accelerators: we work in conjunction with international labs and industry to develop the next generation of accelerators for a range of applications from ion therapy and imaging, energy production and transmutation, curing leather, purifying water, and many others.

Research is conducted in collaboration with prestigious international partners (e.g. ESS, CERN, PSI) and other UK universities, and with industry (e.g. Alceli, Applied Materials, Reliance Precision Ltd).

To find out more about the research we conduct, take a look at our Research, Innovation and Skills webpages, where you will find information on each research area. To find out about our staff visit ‘Our experts’ which features profiles of all our academic staff.

Student support

At the University of Huddersfield, you'll find support networks and services to help you get ahead in your studies and social life. Whether you study at undergraduate or postgraduate level, you'll soon discover that you're never far away from our dedicated staff and resources to help you to navigate through your personal student journey. [Find out more about all our support services|https://www.hud.ac.uk/uni-life/support/#/_ga=2.101775489.1671690502.1506538761-1933642699.1496472371/]

Researcher Environment

The University of Huddersfield has a thriving research community made up of over 1,350 postgraduate research students. We have students studying on a part-time and full-time basis from all over the world with around 43% from overseas and 57% from the UK.

Research plays an important role in informing all our teaching and learning activities. Through undertaking research our staff remain up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, which means you develop knowledge and skills which are current and relevant to your specialist area.

Find out more about our research staff and centres

Important information

We will always try to deliver your course as described on this web page. However, sometimes we may have to make changes as set out below.

When you are offered a place on a research degree, your offer will include confirmation of your supervisory team, and the topic you will be researching.

Whilst the University will use reasonable efforts to ensure your supervisory team remains the same, sometimes it may be necessary to make changes to your team for reasons outside the University’s control, for example if your supervisor leaves the University, or suffers from long term illness. Where this is the case, we will discuss these difficulties with you and seek to either put in place a new supervisory team, or help you to transfer to another research facility, in accordance with our Student Protection Plan.

Changes may also be necessary because of circumstances outside our reasonable control, for example the University being unable to access its buildings due to fire, flood or pandemic, or the University no longer being able to provide specialist equipment. Where this is the case, we will discuss these issues with you and agree any necessary changes.

Your research project is likely to evolve as you work on it and these minor changes are a natural and expected part of your study. However, we may need to make more significant changes to your topic of research during the course of your studies, either because your area of interest has changed, or because for reasons outside the University’s control we can no longer support your research. If this is the case, we will discuss any changes in topic with you and agree these in writing. If you are an international student, changing topics may affect your visa or ATAS clearance and if this is the case we will discuss this with you before any changes are agreed.

When you enrol as a student of the University, your study and time with us will be governed by the University’s Terms and Conditions and a framework of regulations, policies and procedures, which form the basis of your agreement with us. It is important that you familiarise yourself with these as you will be asked to agree to abide by them when you join us as a student. You will find a guide to the key terms here, along with the Student Protection Plan, where you will also find links to the full text of each of the regulations, policies and procedures referred to.

The Office for Students (OfS) is the principal regulator for the University.