Web Programming BSc(Hons)

2021-22 (also available for 2022-23)

It’s not too late to apply for September 2021. Find out more

Start date

20 September 2021

Duration

3 years full-time
4 years inc. placement year

Entry requirements

A Level - BBB

BTEC - DMM

See full entry requirements

Places available (subject to change)

40

About the course

Just about every business and organisation has a web presence. And many of them are looking to expand that presence and use the latest technology such as cloud computing, touch technology or eCommerce mobile apps. There is a huge demand for skilled graduates who understand the technology and can help organisations serve their customers better and stand out from the competition.

If you can keep pace with new technology, for example, cloud computing, touch, gesture and motion-based technology, as well as mobile and tablet apps, and you know how they can be used to:

  • Inform
  • Educate
  • Market
  • Sell
  • Innovate

Then you could be an attractive prospect for an employer. This course aims to provide you with the skills to help organisations harness current technology. We’ll look at making applications for web, desktop, mobiles, kiosks and projections. You’ll study the principles of creating large web-based environments, and accessing data, as well as enhancing cyber security and visualising data.

To help you develop your capabilities, we’ll look at a range of computing languages. The most common ones we use are JavaScript, PHP and ASP.NET, and we’ll also cover innovative frameworks such as Bootstrap and Laravel, as well as taking an indepth look at cyber security, database design, data access and its visualisation.

During your studies you’ll be given the chance to take a placement after your second year. It’s an excellent opportunity to put what you’ve learnt into practice. You can take advantage of our links within the industry to help find a placement that suits you. You could end up anywhere from a globally recognised brand to a small, local company. Gaining real-world experience could make all the difference when you graduate and start looking for a job.

You are encouraged to explore and experiment with new technology and novel concepts. When you graduate you may end up working for a company who specifically wants you for a skill or product you developed in your final year project, or you may decide to take it to market and become an entrepreneur. To be successful on the course you will need a strong interest in the technical side of web/app development and connecting with a variety of data streams.

There's also the opportunity for you to start your own small business through our Enterprise Placement Year scheme. You might like to hear what Dan has to say about studying Web Programming BSc(Hons) formerly Web Technologies.

The teaching team here are fantastic. I feel we're in a position of great privilege being able to positively affect the lives, ambitions and psyche of students. What’s great about this industry is how you can have fun whilst learning. All of the viral things you see on the internet - you can enjoy making these, whilst improving on your skills in animation, video, graphics, database, coding etc. I enjoy helping students to see their place as a future professional, for them to realise their ambitions. I encourage them to get involved in freelance work, raising their awareness of making money creating websites and apps for people, right from the first year.

Michael O'Grady

Dr Michael O'Grady, Course Leader

Course detail

Core modules:

Digital Media Project 1

The digital media industry relies on professionals who work effectively in multi-disciplinary teams. This module aims to gives you early experience of working in such an environment. Working as part of a team, you will have the opportunity to plan, design and develop a digital media product. The module is designed to provide you with an understanding of industry best practices within the digital media industry. You will be introduced to the product development cycle, technology limitations, and possible future developments relevant to each course. You will also be encouraged to begin exploring the enterprising aspects of the digital media industries, by entering competitions or publishing a game, mobile app, website or other digital media artefact.

Introduction to Web Programming

This module is aimed at helping you to develop the knowledge and practical skills needed to create basic interactive websites. The technologies covered are typically HTML, CSS and JavaScript. You'll aim to create a portfolio of webpages that demonstrate a range of HTML and CSS features. You'll also aim to develop a JavaScript application in response to a specified problem.

Digital Media Asset Production

Through this module you are introduced to digital media production tools including digital media hardware, the software that creates visual and audio assets, the Internet and the various technologies that they support. You’ll aim to analyse, design and create static as well as time-based media (animated visual content, video and audio) and produce stand-alone products that are suited to a variety of delivery platforms. You are supported in gaining an understanding of the relevant design, technical and professional issues associated with using each media form and how best to deliver and promote these assets, many of which form comprise elements within large digital media projects.

Introduction to Visual Design

This module provides you with an introduction to the subject of visual design. Throughout the module you’ll be introduced to core design principles, processes and terminology. You will also explore a number of case studies and implement/ apply a basic design process, aiming to build an individual portfolio of design work as you go. You'll be given the opportunity to develop your own design briefs that will require you to research and evaluate a defined problem and be expected to propose an original ‘design concept’ (solution), present your ideas to others for feedback, engage in design criticism, produce a range of original assets (using appropriate industry-standard software) and evaluate your design solution in context.

Introduction to Data Analysis

In a world that is increasingly focusing on Big Data and data analysis, being able to analyse data and report the result of data analysis, and interpret it as useful information, is crucial to being a successful IT professional. This module introduces learners to the fundamentals of data analysis using one or more popular industry-standard data analysis tools.

Introduction to Databases

This module introduces learners to the fundamental concepts involved in the design, implementation and use of relational databases. Learners will develop the skills and knowledge needed to model relational databases based on user requirements, and implement and query databases using a suitable relational database management system (RDBMS) and SQL.

Entry requirements

BBBat A Level

120 UCAS tariff points from a combination of Level 3 qualifications

DMM in BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma

  • Access to Higher Education Diploma with 45 Level 3 credits at Merit or above in a related subject
  • 120 UCAS tariff points from International Baccalaureate qualifications.

Entry is also possible from the Engineering Foundation Year. To progress onto this course from the Foundation Year you must pass all modules and achieve an average mark of 40% or above.

In addition you must have GCSE English Language or Literature and Maths at grade 4 or above, or grade C or above if awarded under the previous GCSE grading scheme.

If your first language is not English, you will need to meet the minimum requirements of an English Language qualification. The minimum for IELTS is 6.0 overall with no element lower than 5.5, or equivalent will be considered acceptable. Read more about the University’s entry requirements for students outside of the UK on our Where are you from information pages..

Other suitable experience or qualifications will be considered. For further information please see the University's minimum entry requirements.

Student work showreel


At Huddersfield, we aim to support you to become highly creative, technically skilled and innovative graduates. Our Web Programming BSc(Hons), Web Design BSc(Hons) ad Web Programming with Cyber Security BSc(Hons) courses give you the opportunity to explore various aspects of web design, and programming, and the technology behind web and digital development. Watch our current student work showreel to find out more.

Watch our student work showreel to find out more.

Placements


This course offers you the chance to undertake an optional placement in Year 3. This opportunity helps you to build on the knowledge and skills developed on the course. You will be employed by the company for 12 months, but the actual number of weeks worked will be dependent on the annual leave entitlement you are given in line with the placement company’s policy.

The optional placement year is highly recommended as a means of becoming focused and raising personal knowledge and skills. With our support, you will have the opportunity to gain in experience, maturity and motivation and return better equipped to succeed in your studies and subsequently to secure the graduate job of your choice.

Previously companies such as Freeman Grattan Holdings, Disney and Kirklees Council have provided our students with placements. You can find more information on placements here.

Alternatively, if you are a student from within the UK, you could consider starting your own small business by applying for the Enterprise Placement Year in conjunction with the University’s Enterprise Team. You’ll have the opportunity to benefit from business advice, mentoring and networking sessions. Find out more information on the Enterprise Placement Year.

After hearing about it during an Open Day, I had my eye on the placement year in Italy, and was lucky enough to get the job. I spent a year in Florence working in a postgraduate university on the help desk, where I was a user support technician.

Leonie Mann

Leonie Mann, Help Desk Technician, European University Institute

Our students

Your career


Previous graduates from courses in this subject area have gone on to work in a variety of roles such as software engineer, junior web designer and IT developer in organisations including Sky, FGH (Freemans Grattan Holdings) and Leeds City Council.**

Additionally, you may gain skills that are transferable to other industries and may be able to pursue any career that requires a good honours degree. You could also go onto further study and the University has many options available for postgraduate study which may interest you.

* Percentage of graduates from this subject who are in work and/or further study fifteen months after graduating (HESA Graduate Outcomes 17/18, UK domiciled graduates).

**Source: LinkedIn

85%* Graduates employed

Student support

At the University of Huddersfield, you'll find support networks and services to help you get ahead in your studies and social life. Whether you study at undergraduate or postgraduate level, you'll soon discover that you're never far away from our dedicated staff and resources to help you to navigate through your personal student journey. Find out more about all our support services.

Research excellence

Research plays an important role in informing all our teaching and learning activities. Through research our staff remain up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, and contribute to society, which means you develop knowledge and skills that are current and highly relevant to industry. For more information, find out more about our Research institutes and centres.

Important information

We will always try to deliver your course as described on this web page. However, sometimes we may have to make changes as set out below.

Changes to a course you have applied for

If we propose to make a major change to a course that you are holding an offer for, then we will tell you as soon as possible so that you can decide whether to withdraw your application prior to enrolment.

Changes to your course after you enrol as a student

We will always try to deliver your course and other services as described. However, sometimes we may have to make changes as set out below:

Changes to option modules

Where your course allows you to choose modules from a range of options, we will review these each year and change them to reflect the expertise of our staff, current trends in research and as a result of student feedback or demand for certain modules. We will always ensure that you have a range of options to choose from and we will let you know in good time the options available for you to choose for the following year.

Major changes

We will only make major changes to the core curriculum of a course or to our services if it is necessary for us to do so and provided such changes are reasonable. A major change in this context is a change that materially changes the services available to you; or the outcomes, or a significant part, of your course, such as the nature of the award or a substantial change to module content, teaching days (part time provision), classes, type of delivery or assessment of the core curriculum.

For example, it may be necessary to make a major change to reflect changes in the law or the requirements of the University’s regulators; to meet the latest requirements of a commissioning or accrediting body; to improve the quality of educational provision; in response to student, examiners’ or other course evaluators’ feedback; and/or to reflect academic or professional changes within subject areas. Major changes may also be necessary because of circumstances outside our reasonable control, such as a key member of staff leaving the University or being unable to teach, where they have a particular specialism that can’t be adequately covered by other members of staff; or due to damage or interruption to buildings, facilities or equipment.

Major changes would usually be made with effect from the next academic year, but this may not always be the case. We will notify you as soon as possible should we need to make a major change and will carry out suitable consultation with affected students. If you reasonably believe that the proposed change will cause you detriment or hardship we will, if appropriate, work with you to try to reduce the adverse effect on you or find an appropriate solution. Where an appropriate solution cannot be found and you contact us in writing before the change takes effect you can cancel your registration and withdraw from the University without liability to the University for future tuition fees. We will provide reasonable support to assist you with transferring to another university if you wish to do so.

Termination of course

In exceptional circumstances, we may, for reasons outside of our control, be forced to discontinue or suspend your course. Where this is the case, a formal exit strategy will be followed and we will notify you as soon as possible about what your options are, which may include transferring to a suitable replacement course for which you are qualified, being provided with individual teaching to complete the award for which you were registered, or claiming an interim award and exiting the University. If you do not wish to take up any of the options that are made available to you, then you can cancel your registration and withdraw from the course without liability to the University for future tuition fees and you will be entitled to a refund of all course fees paid to date. We will provide reasonable support to assist you with transferring to another university if you wish to do so.

When you enrol as a student of the University, your study and time with us will be governed by a framework of regulations, policies and procedures, which form the basis of your agreement with us. These include regulations regarding the assessment of your course, academic integrity, your conduct (including attendance) and disciplinary procedure, fees and finance and compliance with visa requirements (where relevant). It is important that you familiarise yourself with these as you will be asked to agree to abide by them when you join us as a student. You will find a guide to the key terms here, along with the Student Protection Plan, where you will also find links to the full text of each of the regulations, policies and procedures referred to.

The Office for Students (OfS) is the principal regulator for the University.

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