Art and Design (PhD)

2018-19 (also available for 2017-18)

Join the next generation of creative researchers in a dynamic and interactive research community designed to nurture and develop your talent with access to industry-standard facilities and practices.

Start date

17 September 2018

7 January 2019

29 April 2019

Duration

The maximum duration for a full-time PhD is 3 years (36 months) with an optional submission pending (writing up period) of 12 months.

Sometimes it may be possible to mix periods of both full-time and part-time study.

Places available (subject to change)

This is dependent upon supervisory capacity within the subject area

Phone contact: +44 (0)1484 473969

The research degree

A PhD is the highest academic award for which a student can be registered. This programme allows you to explore and pursue a research project built around a substantial piece of work, which has to show evidence of original contribution to knowledge.

A full-time PhD is a three year full time or six year part time programme of research, culminating in the production of a large-scale piece of written work in the form of a research thesis that should not normally exceed 40,000 words. Alternatively in the art and design subject where the submission is accompanied by material in other than written form, the written commentary should normally be a minimum of 10,000 words.

Completing a PhD can give you a great sense of personal achievement and help you develop a high level of transferable skills which will be useful in your subsequent career, as well as contributing to the development of knowledge in your chosen field.

You are expected to work to an approved programme of work including appropriate programmes of postgraduate study (which may be drawn from parts of existing postgraduate courses, final year degree programmes, conferences, seminars, guided reading or a combination of study methods).

You will be appointed a main supervisor who will normally be part of a supervisory team, comprising up to three members to advise and support you on your project.

Entry requirements

Entry requirements for this course are normally:

A Master’s degree or an Honours degree (2:1 or above) or equivalent, in a discipline appropriate to the proposed programme to be followed, or appropriate research or professional experience at postgraduate level, which has resulted in published work, written reports or other appropriate evidence of accomplishment.

For applicants whose first language or language of instruction is not English you will need to meet the minimum requirements of an English Language qualification. The minimum of IELTS 6.0 overall with no element lower than 5.5, will be considered acceptable, or equivalent.

Further information on international entry requirements and English language entry requirements is available on our international webpages.

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Our award-winning academic staff will be on hand to chat about all our postgraduate study and research options, flexible teaching and how postgraduate study can help you to advance your career or prepare for a career change. 

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What can I research?

There are several research topics available for this degree. See below for full details of individual research areas including an outline of the topics, the supervisor, funding information and eligibility criteria:

Outline

"ICE and Honeypot are two projects based in the school of Art, Design and Architecture which are funded through the Royal Academy of Engineering visiting professor scheme. They act as a catalyst to networking across the different departments and schools across the University of Huddersfield. Illustrating that design is the interface for many disciplines. The students are very passionate when working together and the interdisciplinary nature of the project enables a toolkit of skills to be developed beyond the traditional discipline. The project has been recognised as a model of good practice and has a number of published case-studies acting as a blue print for embedding interdisciplinarity in the Higher Education sector. The “Innovation Creative Exchange” (ICE) at the University of Huddersfield provides a successful structure for embedding enterprise education through interdisciplinary industry collaborations. ICE provides a dynamic and unique environment outside the traditional curriculum for undergraduate students to work on industry led challenges which crosses discipline boundaries. It introduces disruptive parameters to impact on learning, placing students in a time controlled environment, challenging students both creatively and technically in a competitive environment, thus developing essential entrepreneurial skills. The Honeypot builds on the notion of a ‘trap’ in which all forms of ideas can be brought together, dismissed or debated in both a physical and on-line environment. The presentation focuses around the success and challenges of designing and implementing this platform for innovation and its subsequent impact. Dr Power is Academic Lead for both projects. " Dr Power has been involved in, and managed a variety of internally and externally funded research projects in the areas of technical textiles, performance clothing, anthropometrics, knitwear sizing and pedagogical evaluation. The University has state of the art textile manufacturing and apparel production equipment which extend beyond fashion into apparel and functional clothing. Dr Power has authored a number of publications in this area. Including investigation of high performance clothing, specifically focusing on the objective measurement and subjective assessment of advanced textile materials. Dr Power is a management member of the University of Huddersfield Institute of Skin integrity and infection projection, which aims to promote a fully integrated, complete and coordinated, applied science to clinical practice, ethos; including investigation into the function of the skin as a barrier against medications, wound dressings and antimicrobials, design and development, clinical evaluation of products and devices and exploration of quality of life indictors for patients and their significant others. She is also a member of Innovative Design Lab within the School of art, Design and Architecture. Dr Power recently led an interdisciplinary team of experts in the Design of a textile device that safely and comfortably, contains the tubing inserted into the chests of youngsters during chemotherapy treatment. This was a collaboration by University of Huddersfield and a local charity and set to improve the quality-of-care for child cancer patients. Dr Power welcomes collaborations with the commercial and not-for-profit sector. The University of Huddersfield is devoted to practice based, scholarly research in creative pattern cutting and ways in which it can be explored, much further through the intellectual relationship between theory and practice. The School of Art, Design and Architecture hosted the First and Second International Conference for Creative Pattern Cutting in 2013 and 2016. Dr Power has been involved in, and managed a variety of internally and externally funded research projects in the areas of technical textiles, performance clothing, anthropometrics, knitwear sizing and pedagogical evaluation. Her PhD research was an investigation into parameters affecting the 3-Dimensional weft knitting of high performance yarns, in particular those of a conductive nature. This lead to further research in the field of electro conductive textiles and the integration of wearable’s within clothing, otherwise known as smart/intelligent clothing. Dr Power is a specialist in the area weft knitting and has published extensively in this area. The School has state of the art textile manufacturing and apparel production equipment which extend beyond fashion into apparel, functional clothing and technical application. The University of Huddersfield hosted the Transition Conference: Re-thinking Textiles and Surfaces in 2014 and has a heritage in the textiles area. Dr Power is a member of Innovative Design lab within the School of Art, Design and Architecture and a management member of the University of Huddersfield’s Institute of Skin integrity and infection projection, which aims to promote a fully integrated, complete and coordinated, applied science to clinical practice, ethos; including investigation into the function of the skin as a barrier against medications, wound dressings and antimicrobials, design and development, clinical evaluation of products and devices and exploration of quality of life indictors for patients and their significant others.

Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Standard University deadlines apply

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

This began as PhD research around the artistic encounter and the notion of affect, and through Research Excellence Framework 2014 impact case study work it developed a focus on measuring the impact and value of arts projects in the public realm. Today this research incorporates collaborative work on the ROTOR exhibitions programme at Huddersfield Art Gallery and evaluation consultation for a Creative People and Places programme of events to explore public engagement as both concept and method; cultural citizenship; cultural leadership; and the notion of the 'civic university'. Related publications include http://www.cambridgescholars.com/what-is-to-be-http://ijaspc.cgpublisher.com/product/pub.233/prod.110. Stemming from MA and PhD research which explores art-audience relationships and challenging or subversive exhibition techniques which complicate this relationship, subsequent research has addressed the relationship between expectation and interpretation; exhibitionary ‘disjunctions’; artistic encounters as game-playing; the notion of the chance encounter; and the impact of document and media upon art’s ability to function – both practically and conceptually – within and outside of its exhibition context.  The connections between histories of art and graphic design and  the role, influence and ‘authority’ of archives, archivists, exhibitions and curators. It uses the medium of a Tumblr weblog which functions self-reflexively and critically, providing a vehicle for data collection while simultaneously as an ongoing and potentially infinite piece of ‘living’ research (see http://archiveofnothingness.tumblr.comhttp://archiveofnothingness.tumblr.com and http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-Article,id=19826/). a cross-organisational project which assesses the role and impact of contemporary art sited in heritage spaces, exploring the ways in which we might capture, measure and articulate the value of these intersections and the challenges they create (see http://www.ccsmgh.leeds.ac.uk/research/intersecting-practices-assessing-the-role-and-impact-of-contemporary-art-in-heritage-spaces).

Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Standard University deadlines apply

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

My research explores the use of documentary imagery in relation to art practices that explicitly operate in social and political realms and is interested in how antagonistic socially engaged art practices are a vital force in democratic society. I am interested in the discursive qualities of photography that have been expanded through the convergence of digital imaging devices and the increased speed of data transmission that has come to be known as web 2.0. This convergence has had the function of transforming our understanding and use of photographic images from objects that could be described as factual statements, into flows of data, becoming ephemeral gestures more equivalent to speech. The social agency of photographic practices lie within maintaining a ‘productive tension’ created by the photograph’s paradoxical roles of documentation and the aesthetic abstraction of events or moments, that is a vital force in the use of photographs as discursive documents. One means of considering this productive tension, this paradoxical double function is through an exploration of the subversive and transgressive qualities of the literary genre, ‘Magical Realism.’ It is the oxymoronic ambiguity of the term Magical Realism that makes it so useful in discussing photographic practice. The productive tension created by the photograph’s indexical relationship to its referent and its abstraction into imagery is equivalent to Magical Realism’s inherent inclusion of contradictory elements. Magical Realism explores the impact fiction has on reality, reality on fiction and the reader’s role in between; as such, it is well suited for drawing attention to social or political criticism.

Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Standard University deadlines apply

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Designart is the dynamic interface between design and art in the production of a new hybrid artform. Examples include Richard Hamilton's homage to Dieter Rams and Olafur Eliasson's pavilions. Tate Publishing released the first book on the subject in 2005 and MIT/Whitechapel the first anthology of critical texts on it in 2007. The studio is a space in which art and design driven work is conceived and fabricated. Most recently it has been explored in 'The Transdisciplinary Studio'. First developed in the writings of Bruce Sterling, Design fiction is a genre of design that uses fiction as a conceptual device to explore speculative scenarios. Transdisciplinarity refers to the ongoing melting of boundaries between disciplines, especially art, design and architecture.

Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Standard University deadlines apply

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Use of Direct Digital Manufacturing, Rapid Prototyping, and Additive Manufacturing technologies in Industrial - Product Design processes, application of CAD/CAM  in medical industry, mass customisation and custom fitting, wearable products, design optimisation, material test and design test simulations, Application of 3D Digital Sculpting and 3D Scanning  for Historical, Product Design, Representations, and 3D Craft Form generations, including construction of 3D Anthropometric database using body and face scanning, visual programming language for bespoke products, Advance 3D Modelling techniques (Polygon, NURBs, Solid, Class A Modelling) Development of innovative approaches to mould and shape forming, prototyping and manufacturing of injection moulding, castings, patterns, products development, innovation in low volume manufacturing, Animations, simulations and ergonomic analysis of human working conditions; projects might include experimentation of various situations such as bicycle riding posture, low speed vehicle accidents, breaking and acceleration analysis, analysis of accessibility to vehicles, machines or buildings. Motion capturing and 3D visualisation and simulation technologies: Human behaviour analysis using motion captured data and photogrammetry. Application of 3D motion capturing methods for automotive, transport and vehicle driving simulations, outdoor measurement and user behaviour analysis and their applications.

Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Standard University deadlines apply

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Since 2009, I have exploring different approaches to archives and archival content in and through artistic research. This registers the archive, as an important site for the generation of different narratives of sculptural thinking. Projects include the curation of an exhibition Thought Positions in Sculpture (Huddersfield Art Gallery 2015-2016), a project which used the exhibition environment as a platform and starting point for considering the sculptural facets of thinking activity. This project works with the themes of research-creation, concepts-in-the-making and the democracies of experience evolving out of the practices of artistic research I have an interest in public, social and artistic places and spaces within which sculpture and sculptural thinking may sit. This includes the specific environments and landscapes of sculpture parks and sculpture festivals. Recent projects include a symposium entitled Putting Space into Action (2016), which explored the ways in which artistic projects, past and present, have deployed different approaches to the dynamics of activating space in art and culture I am currently working on several projects in and around sculptural plasticity and the discourses of neuroscience. I am investigating ‘sculptural plasticity’ as a distinct mode of thinking in art and science. This research has evolved out new materialist readings of sculptural practice. With an interest in Catherine Malabou’s work on 'plasticity' and Karen Barad’s writings on ‘diffraction’, I am seeking to address how plasticity, as it is formed in and through examples drawn from art, philosophy, literature and neuroscience, may provide new methodological insights into sculptural thinking. In particular, the diffractive patterns of exchange between sculptural formations of plasticity in the context of the phenomenon of the ‘brain-body-in-culture’: a double condition where the formations and transformations of human and non-human activity are in continuous intra-action As part of the processes and practices of collective social engagement and collaboration, I am addressing the sensory-aesthetic registrations of sculptural thinking in groups and how this manifests itself in and through the choreographies of the body (performance art), the self-forming and self-fashioning of identities within group matrices (social sculpture) and the social formations of being and becoming in neuronally diverse creative spaces (community art practices). This research sits within the spatial, social and sensorial registers of sculptural thinking in group matrices. 

Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Standard University deadlines apply

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

This research area comprises a critical engagement with a wide range of practices that draw on the daily conditions and associations of textiles as a communicator of ideas about the social, political and artistic. Traditionally an undervalued medium, textiles innate elasticity and ability to move flexibly into a range of interdisciplinary discourses are increasingly relevant and thought provoking within the contemporary world The investigation involves the transformative potential of art and craft in facing contemporary social concerns and as a catalyst for community cohesion with ability to achieve new definitions of value and community through the depth of the research. The research process can comprise community-led models of collaboration, social engagement, crafting and volunteering within the realms of education, curatorial practice and relational art. A research area that considers the transient interconnection with others encountered during travel on public transport systems to achieve unexpected and meaningful connections with the functionality of a journey. Working partners in this research area include small-scale transport businesses, community rail networks as well as public art commissioning bodies. A methodology that is led by new research, insights and discoveries into our public and private spaces through a consideration of spatial, aesthetic, historic, geographic and conceptual concerns. This will inform interventionist practice-based approaches to site-specificity and the ability to insert creativity into the context of social, economic and environmental challenges, such as the consideration of community voice during periods of road building, the creativity and regeneration of Britain’s towns and cities and residencies engaging with rural communities.

Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Standard University deadlines apply

Supervisors

How to apply

The School of Art, Design and Architecture, home to award-winning staff members at the University of Huddersfield, fosters the next generation of creative researchers as part of a dynamic and interactive learning community enabling postgraduate students to nurture and develop their talents. The School has approximately 100+ research students, from a growing number of different nationalities. We particularly welcome inter and multidisciplinary research. Applications are welcome in, but not limited to, the following research areas:


• Art History and Theory
• Costume Studies
• Creative Pattern Cutting and Technologies
• Cultural Leadership and Public Engagement
• Design Pedagogy
• Digital Design, Digital Media Arts and 3D Animation
• Fashion Ecology, Economics and Business Engagement
• Fashion Retail and Social Media
• Graphics and Publishing
• Photography
• Sculpture Studies
• Serious Games for Education and Healthcare
• Textile Crafts and Textile Futures

To find out more about the research we conduct, take a look at our Research, Innovation and Skills webpages, where you will find information on each research area. To find out about our staff visit ‘Our experts’ which features profiles of all our academic staff.

Research community

The University of Huddersfield has a thriving research community made up of over 1,350 postgraduate research students. We have students studying on a part-time and full-time basis from all over the world with around 43% from overseas and 57% from the UK.

Research plays an important role in informing all our teaching and learning activities. Through undertaking research our staff remain up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, which means you develop knowledge and skills which are current and relevant to your specialist area.

Find out more about our research staff and centres

Research support

The University of Huddersfield has an exciting and comprehensive Researcher Skills Development Programme available to all postgraduate researchers. The Researcher Skills Development Programme supports our researchers to broaden their knowledge, allowing them to access tools and skills which can significantly improve employability, whether in academia or industry. It’s important to develop transferable personal and professional skills alongside the research skills and techniques necessary for your postgraduate study and research. The programme is also mapped onto Vitae’s Researcher Development Framework (RDF), allowing researchers at the University of Huddersfield to benefit from Vitae support as well as our own Programme.

We offer skills training through a programme designed to take advantage of technology platforms as well as face-to-face workshops and courses. The University has subscribed to Epigeum, a programme of on-line research training support designed and managed by staff at Imperial College London which will be accessed via UniLearn, the University’s Virtual Learning Environment.

In addition, the School of Art, Design and Architecture run their own research training programme, offering specific skill/ practice based support in research methodology. These sessions will largely be accessible live via the web, and recorded for access at a later date via UniLearn.

Student support

At the University of Huddersfield, you'll find support networks and services to help you get ahead in your studies and social life. Whether you study at undergraduate or postgraduate level, you'll soon discover that you're never far away from our dedicated staff and resources to help you to navigate through your personal student journey. Find out more about all our support services.

Important information

We will always try to deliver your course as described on this web page. However, sometimes we may have to make changes to aspects of a course or how it is delivered. We only make these changes if they are for reasons outside of our control, or where they are for our students' benefit. We will let you know about any such changes as soon as possible. Our regulations set out our procedure which we will follow when we need to make any such changes.

When you enrol as a student of the University, your study and time with us will be governed by a framework of regulations, policies and procedures, which form the basis of your agreement with us. These include regulations regarding the assessment of your course, academic integrity, your conduct (including attendance) and disciplinary procedure, fees and finance and compliance with visa requirements (where relevant). It is important that you familiarise yourself with these as you will be asked to agree to abide by them when you join us as a student. You will find a guide to the key terms here, where you will also find links to the full text of each of the regulations, policies and procedures referred to.

The Higher Education Funding Council for England is the principal regulator for the University.

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