Engineering (MSc by Research)

2018-19 (also available for 2017-18)

A spirit of collaboration remains at the heart of everything we do and our continuing commitment to excellence in engineering is reflected in the outstanding achievements of our research staff, students and business partnerships.

Start date

17 September 2018

7 January 2019

29 April 2019

Duration

The maximum duration for a full-time MSc by Research is 1 year (12 months) with an optional submission pending (writing up period) of 4 months.

Sometimes it may be possible to mix periods of both full-time and part-time study.

Places available (subject to change)

This is dependent upon supervisory capacity within the subject area

Phone contact: +44 (0)1484 473969

The research degree

A Master's by Research (MSc) allows you to undertake a one year (full-time) research degree. It contains little or no formal taught component. This type of study gives you the chance to explore a research topic over a shorter time than a more in-depth doctoral programme.

Research Master's students choose a specific project to work on and have a greater degree of independence in their work than is the case with a taught Master’s course.

You’ll be expected to work to an approved programme of work which you will develop in conjunction with your supervisor within the first few months of starting your studies.

Whilst undertaking the research project you will also have the opportunity to develop your research skills by taking part in training courses and events .

The approved programme of training and research combines advanced study, research methodology and a substantial research project, or series of research projects in a chosen field.

You will be appointed a main supervisor who will normally be part of a supervisory team, comprising up to three members to advise and support you on your project.

At the end of the project you write up your findings in the form of a short thesis not normally exceeding 25,000 words (excluding ancillary data), which will then be examined.

On successful completion, you will be awarded your degree and if you have enjoyed this taste of research you may then decide to apply for the full research doctoral degree (PhD).

Entry requirements

The normal entry requirements for enrolment on a MSc by Research is an upper second honours degree (2.1) from a UK university or a qualification of an equivalent standard, in a discipline appropriate to that of the proposed programme to be followed.

For applicants whose first language or language of instruction is not English you will need to meet the minimum requirements of an English Language qualification (the minimum of IELTS 6.0 overall with no element lower than 5.5, or equivalent will be considered acceptable).

Further information on international entry requirements and English language entry requirements is available on our international webpages.

Why choose Huddersfield?


There are many reasons to choose the University of Huddersfield and here are just five of them:

  1. We were named University of the Year by Times Higher Education in 2013.
  2. Huddersfield is the only University where 100% of permanent teaching staff are Fellows of the Higher Education Authority.
  3. Our courses have been accredited by 41 professional bodies.
  4. 94.6% of our postgraduate students go on to work and/or further study within six months of graduating.
  5. We have world-leading applied research groups in Biomedical Sciences, Engineering and Physical Sciences, Social Sciences and Arts and Humanities.

What can I research?

There are several research topics available for this degree. See below for full details of individual research areas including an outline of the topics, the supervisor, funding information and eligibility criteria:

Outline

Wind farm efficiency is somewhat determined by turbine efficiency, which in tum depends upon wake effects. Turbines situated wholly or partially in the wake of leading turbines are severely restricted in their efficiency, according to size, wind speed and direction and spacing between turbines. The aim of the project is to create a semi-analytical model of air flow behind a horizontal axis wind turbine, principally for use by wind farm designers in the industry. Current models are either too crude to be of certain value or too sophisticated (or time­ consuming) to be incorporated into iterative turbine placement design schemes or software. The most common and crudest model still in use was devised in 1983. Applicants will need a sound Mechanical or Energy Engineering background and a good understanding of the near field aerodynamics of a horizontal axis wind turbine. The project requires a very numerate approach and a good background in applications of mathematics would also be required. For calibration and validation of the model a number of simulations using Computational Fluid Dynamics will be necessary and applicants should be well versed in this type of work, preferably using ANSYS Fluent or similar software.

Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available

Deadline

Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Renewable energy is an essential source for harnessing natural forces such as wind energy in an age which is very conscious of the environmental effects of burning fossil fuels, and where sustainability is an ethical norm. Therefore, the focus is currently on both the adequacy of long-term energy supply, as well as the environmental implications of particular sources. In that regard, the near certainty of costs being imposed on carbon dioxide emissions in developed countries has profoundly changed the economic outlook of clean energy sources. Wind turbines have vastly been developed in recent decades due to technology becoming more advanced. Since there is a continuous exhaustion of fossil fuels, it is of high interest with government encouragement to utilise wind technology. Wind turbines are currently advancing into cross-flow vertical axis operation, whereby research has shown a significant increase in performance compared to existing technologies. The need for sustainable energy sources becomes greater each year due to the continued depletion of fossil fuels and the resulting energy crisis. Solutions to this problem are potentially in the form of wind turbines, for sustainable urban environment, that have been receiving increased support. At present, a number of wind turbines have been developed that show significant increase in performance compared to existing technologies.

Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Auralisation is a popular technique used for simulating the acoustics of an enclosed space over loudspeakers or headphones in building acoustics. A realistic and natural auralisation is also highly important in consumer three-dimensional and VR audio applications. Ambisonics is currently the most widely used capture and reproduction technique. Although it provides an accurate source localisation, it has a limitation in delivering an enveloping and natural environmental (ambient) sound. Furthermore, there is still a lack of complete understanding about how a microphone array should be configured in order to provide an optimal sense of 3D listener envelopment when capturing environmental sound. Therefore, this project will examine the perceptual effect of width, depth and height of a 3D microphone array for environmental auralisation. This will be done with various experimental variables such as loudspeaker configuration, sound source, acoustic condition, etc. taken into account. This project requires good understandings of acoustics, spatial audio psychoacoustics and stereo/surround microphone techniques, as well as good programming skills in Matlab and Max. Experience in conducting a subjective listening test and a basic statistical analysis is also required.

Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Multi component and multiphase mixture flows take place through a number of industrial stems and contribute to a number of processes. Some practical examples of such flows are solid-liquid flow, solid-gas flow, solid-liquid-gas flow, oil - water flow etc. Some of the most common industries where these flows are encountered are Nuclear Industry, Mining Industry, and Chemical Industry etc. The operation, monitoring and control of these flows need detailed knowledge about the flow characteristics of individual components and individual phases. The problem becomes especially complex if the flows are taking place through complex geometries for example helical pipes, elbows valves etc. Through this project novel techniques will be developed to understand local flow features associated with individual components and phases and integrating this information to develop design tools/standards for these processes. The special computational/experimental techniques developed will enable quantification of interphase interaction mechanism. It is expected that the work carried out under this project will enable removal of empiricism embedded in design methodologies to a large extent. It will further allow development of methodologies to trouble free operation and energy use optimisation for such systems.

Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

A prilling tower is an integral part of any fertilizer plant. A hot fluid (normally urea) is sprayed from a nozzle at the top of the tower forming droplets of urea. These droplets fall under the action of gravity, releasing their energy content, and hence, forming solid prills of urea, which is extensively used as a fertilizer. It is often seen that a lot of the prills formed at the base of the tower doesn't have enough strength to remain in the form of a prill; hence, they disintegrate into powder, wasting an excessive amount of the product. This happens because of ineffective cooling in the tower. The current research work will look into the dynamic of vortex rings for effective cooling purposes within a prilling tower. Vortex rings are inherent in nature and have been a topic of interest for almost a millennium. The urge to utilise vortex rings for multi-purpose applications, such as in cooling of urea droplets in a prilling tower, has led to the development of various types of vortex rings. However, in-depth analysis of the flow phenomena associated with vortex rings is still very little known. This study will investigate the dynamics of a vortex ring's generation, propagation and its ultimate dissipation within a prilling tower. The effect of the geometrical, flow and fluid parameters on the rolling—upof the fluid's shear layers will be analysed using a number of analytical, experimental and numerical techniques. It is expected that this study will result into a practical device that can be installed on the top of the prilling tower, which can enhance the cooling process, hence substantially reducing the waste powder.

Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

The proposal is to investigate how non-metallic reinforcement added into aluminium alloys can be used to its maximum effect. The addition may be into molten cast aluminium, or into semi solid “squeeze compression moulded” aluminium, where the metal is treated more like a plastic and worked in a semi-molten state. In either case, treating the material more like a polymer composite than a metal allows creation of orthotropic qualities which can be used to optimise designs, aligning the maximum material strengths with the loading directions. This will allow reduction of mass, and more importantly, inertia in highly stressed components such as compressor impellers, enabling better transient response. Characterisation of these materials following a range of processing methods will allow development of constitutive modelling techniques which will capture the behaviour of the material in specific design situations. These modelling techniques can then be validated against test in a range of highly directionally loaded situations using realistic operating conditions. Generic design rules for optimal design of such components can then be developed. Applicants should have a knowledge of materials and Finite Element Analysis.

Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Standard University deadlines apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

In recent years, the range of smart sensing technologies has expanded rapidly. This has led to a corresponding expansion in condition monitoring of systems, structures, vehicles, and machinery using smart sensors. With advancements in condition monitoring technologies, the condition based maintenance strategy has become a powerful means to reduce the cost of system operation and maintenance for railway vehicle and railway infrastructure like rail tracks, bridges, tunnels etc. This project will focus on design and development of novel dedicated intelligent sensors for automated condition monitoring of railway vehicle subsystem such as chassis, bogie and wheels. It may also try to develop smart sensing devices for monitoring railway infrastructure such as bridges and rail tracks. The dedicated smart sensors can adapt to changes of environment such that they can maximize the performance and minimize the maintenance expense of railway vehicles.

The specific knowledge and experiences needed for the project are: • Mechanical vibration and noise measurement • Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System design • Data fusion and signal processing • Artificial intelligence

Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Most polymers are limited in their scope of use as a replacement for metals due to the differences in material properties such as strength, thermal expansion, creep, brittleness etc. In order to achieve the required properties, the components need to be redesigned to take the different material properties into account. To allow accurate design analysis, these properties need to be characterised and suitable mathematical models defined. The project will include characterisation of materials with suitable bulk properties to include the variable properties which can be used to improve the performance of the end product, such as polymer chain or reinforcing strand alignment. If a suitable constitutive model is not available, then the relevant mathematical modelling will need to be undertaken to provide the basis for design analysis. This will need to take into account the proposed manufacturing method, which may have influences on the final localised properties of the material. The models developed can then be used to design components which will be tested under typical operating conditions to validate their suitability for replacement of metal components. The student will need a thorough understanding of polymeric materials and non-linear modelling techniques, and preferably some experience of test methodologies.

Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Standard University deadlines apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Infrastructure systems consist of a number of sub-systems carrying a wide variety of solid-liquid-gaseous materials. Failure of one of the sub-systems may result in release of these materials in an uncontrolled manner. Risk mitigation strategies need to be designed keeping variety of leak scenarios. Furthermore, an array of sensors is needed to provide dispersion characteristics through a well-developed formulation. The information provided through such methods is limited in scope and accuracy in the present work a CFD based solution algorithm will be developed that integrates pre-developed flow scenarios with sensor array information to provide qualitative and quantitative pollutant dispersion characteristics. The developed system will be capable of informing real time pollution dispersion characteristics and will help in developing risk mitigation strategies.

Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

In the oil-gas fields, slurry flow, gas-in-water two phase flows, and oil-gas-water three phase flows are frequently encountered. Generally, the measurement of volumetric flow rate for each phase is of most interest, especially in subsea oil-gas production applications, where it is essential to obtain oil, water and gas flow rates in inclined oil wells. The problem of how to accurately measure these flow parameters for such complicated flow phenomena, without using expensive test separators and intrusive technique, is a major challenge for the industry. Most conventional multiphase flow meters have severe limitations regarding types of flow and their measurement reliability. Some useful techniques containing radioactive sources are available but they are expensive and potential harmful to humans. Thus, the new developed system will be capable of measuring the local volume fraction local distribution and local velocity distributions of each phase based on tomographic techniques that does not contain a radioactive source.

Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available

Deadline

Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

The Institute of Railway Research (IRR) is seeking a candidate to engage in a programme of research that will develop energy harvesting conversion mechanisms for the railway network. The GB railway network is a vast and, in parts, dense network that covers over 15 thousand kilometres of track; this offers fertile ground to plant harvesting technology to untether sensing devices. Sensing technology when removed from an electrical outlet must be battery powered; however, batteries require charging/changing which, in a large sensor network composed of many nodes, is prohibitively costly. This research work will investigate the energy harvesting potential of a number of typical railway applications. It will conceptualise, design, simulate and build energy harvesters potentially covering a range of typical energy sources, including vibration, wind, solar and heat transducers. In addition to the transducers, the candidate will develop energy management systems for untethered microprocessors. The aim of the doctorate will be to develop, test and validate harvesters and energy management for an ultra-low-power sensor network system for railway applications. The candidate must have competence in mechanical modelling of physical systems. He/she will ideally have a mixed electrical and mechanical background. Proficient in CAD, FEA, C-programming and Matlab. They will have deep knowledge of MEMS sensor technology and wireless sensor networks.

Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Ballistic containment of high speed particles is a requirement for many rotating machines (aero engines, turbochargers, motors) in case of rotor failure. In aerospace applications, ballistic "jackets" are used, to prevent any engine parts escaping through the casing and striking the fuselage, however these are made from 20 fabrics where the seams present potential failure locations. For smaller applications with complex geometry a 3D construction which minimises the number of seams is required. The closer proximity of the jacket to the component also requires a higher temperature capability. Fibres will play an important role in the structure mechanics of such a jacket and the structural properties are often dependant on the fibre type, yam construction and positioning within the material structure. Development of a jacket of this type will require formulation of mathematical methods of representing complex fabric formations and their behaviour on impact from a projectile. The yam will need to have properties capable of surviving the challenging environments which the application is likely to encounter. The jacket design then needs to be translated to a textile preform pattern which can be manufactured. Applicants should have a knowledge of materials and textile manufacturing processes.

Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

In turbine housings, the peak temperatures only occur over small sections of the operating cycle. The proposal is to develop lightweight turbine housings based on sheet steel casings enclosing a phase change material, which absorb the energy during the high temperature excursions, thus protecting the steel housing. An added benefit would be that when the temperature dropped, the energy absorbed would be released back into the turbine, improving efficiency there as well. Research needs to be undertaken into determining suitable phase change materials for this purpose, and how they can be incorporated into the challenging environment necessitated by the application. Applicants should have a knowledge of materials and Finite Element Analysis.

Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Standard University deadlines apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

This project will deliver a code for inverse design of blade surface for different climatic conditions. The wind turbine systems incorporating these blades will be expected to be effective in extreme weather conditions. The main benefit of this work will be to increase the efficiency of operation of wind turbines in cold regions which will also contribute to the improvement of turbine safety and lifetime.

Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

This research wishes to investigate ways in which new developments in audio measurement can be utilised in the mixing and mastering process. The study will look at the design and implementation of key developments in Music Information Retrieval (MIR) both from a historical and technical perspective. In addition, recent developments in such areas as touch screen technology will be explored along with visualisation and parameter control. Proposals for new visualisation strategies will be developed along with working prototypes where applicable. The developed ideas could be implemented in C/C++ and/or MATLAB and consequently some of these skills are required. Experience of GUI programming and/or embedded systems and interfacing would be highly desirable but not essential.

Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Standard University deadlines apply see - http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Railway vehicle suspension systems are generally complex and non-linear and require regular maintenance to ensure safe and efficient performance. Monitoring of railway vehicle structure health is a key part of maintenance strategy as it can give early warning if a railway vehicle is becoming unsafe. This project aims theoretically and experimentally to detect changes in railway vehicle structure parameters like damping ratio and spring stiffness and study the feasibility of using model analysis technique and data fusion for continuous condition monitoring of railway vehicle structures.

The specific knowledge and experiences needed for the project are as follows: • Mechanical vibration and noise measurement • Experimental modal analysis and data fusion • Artificial intelligence

Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

The aim of the research work is to develop an inverse design methodology to develop a unique surface profile for a required functional performance (flow behaviour) and hence it will involve development of an algorithm to generate surface profiles from geometrical parameters characterising the surface as well as develop molecular flow model for flow near the wall surface having artificially created roughness and establish quantitative dependence of surface parameters with flow features very close to the wall. Furthermore development of computational fluid dynamic simulations (continuum based) for flow over wall surface and establish quantitative dependence of surface roughness parameters with flow features away from the wall will be an essential part of this project.

Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Additive manufacturing (AM) is paving its way toward the next industrial revolution. However many technical barriers still hinder its full commercialisation today. One major issue is that AM processes are not robust enough and AM needs measurement methods to control its process. This project aims to develop a set of advanced surface topography analysis techniques for the characterisation of additively manufactured (AM) products. Through characterising AM surface topography, the project will contribute to the optimisation of AM process variables, facilitate the functional evaluation of complex AM components and benefit the accurate geometrical measurement of AM products. The proposed research work include: (1) development of numerical analysis methods, including filtration and segmentation, to extract AM process signature features; (2) investigation of the relevance of area surface texture parameters to AM processes; (3) proposal of new parameters to reflect the unique characteristics of AM surfaces; (4) comparison of various surface metrology techniques for AM surfaces, including tactile, optical and x-ray computed tomography; (5) investigation of the influence of AM roughness texture on dimensional measurement; (6) investigation of the impact of AM process variables on produced surface topography; (7) prediction of AM surface topography in terms of AM process variables.

Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

Auditory source distance (ASD) is an important attribute for the rendering of realistic binaural audio for virtual reality (VR) since it is related to the degree of externalisation (outside-the-head localisation). It is widely accepted that the Direct to Reverberant energy ratio (D/R ratio) is the most effective measure for perceived source distance. However, this measure is only crude as it does not separately treat the two important elements of reverberation: early reflections (up to 80ms) and late reflections (beyond 80ms). These two segments of reflections may have different perceptual roles on ASD and externalisation, but this has not been investigated yet exclusively. Therefore, this project will investigate the independent roles of D/ER and D/LR ratios on perceived distance and externalisation as well as the optimal energy balance between ER and LR in VR audio rendering for headphone reproduction. This will be done for various different room size, source directions and source types. The applicant for this project will have good basic knowledge in acoustics and spatial audio psychoacoustics as well as good programming skills in Matlab and Max. Experience in conducting a subjective listening test and a basic statistical analysis is also required.

Funding

Please see our Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Standard University deadlines Apply: http://www.hud.ac.uk/researchdegrees/howtoapply/

Supervisors

How to apply

We offer supervision to PhD level in a wide range of areas where we are carrying out state of the art research.

The School of Computing and Engineering has three institutes and a number of research centres and groups that cover a diverse range of topics within Mechanical and Electronic Engineering:


Institute of Railway Research


Turbocharger Research Institute


Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Advanced Metrology


Institute for Accelerator Applications


Centre for Efficiency and Performance Engineering


Centre for Precision Technologies


Adaptive Music Technologies Research Group


Energy, Emissions and the Environment Group


Condition Monitoring and Diagnosis Group


Measurement and Data Analysis Group


Electron Microscopy and Materials Analysis Group


Automotive and Marine Engineering Research Group


Music Technology and Production Research Group


Systems Engineering Research Group

To find out more about the research we conduct, take a look at our Research, Innovation and Skills webpages, where you will find information on each research area. To find out about our staff visit ‘Our experts’ which features profiles of all our academic staff.

Research community

The University of Huddersfield has a thriving research community made up of over 1,350 postgraduate research students. We have students studying on a part-time and full-time basis from all over the world with around 43% from overseas and 57% from the UK.

Research plays an important role in informing all our teaching and learning activities. Through undertaking research our staff remain up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, which means you develop knowledge and skills which are current and relevant to your specialist area.

Find out more about our research staff and centres

Research support

The University of Huddersfield has an exciting and comprehensive Researcher Skills Development Programme available to all postgraduate researchers. The Researcher Skills Development Programme supports our researchers to broaden their knowledge, allowing them to access tools and skills which can significantly improve employability, whether in academia or industry. It’s important to develop transferable personal and professional skills alongside the research skills and techniques necessary for your postgraduate study and research. The programme is also mapped onto Vitae’s Researcher Development Framework (RDF), allowing researchers at the University of Huddersfield to benefit from Vitae support as well as our own Programme.

We offer skills training through a programme designed to take advantage of technology platforms as well as face-to-face workshops and courses. The University has subscribed to Epigeum, a programme of on-line research training support designed and managed by staff at Imperial College London which will be accessed via UniLearn, the University’s Virtual Learning Environment.

Student support

At the University of Huddersfield, you'll find support networks and services to help you get ahead in your studies and social life. Whether you study at undergraduate or postgraduate level, you'll soon discover that you're never far away from our dedicated staff and resources to help you to navigate through your personal student journey. Find out more about all our support services.

Important information

We will always try to deliver your course as described on this web page. However, sometimes we may have to make changes to aspects of a course or how it is delivered. We only make these changes if they are for reasons outside of our control, or where they are for our students' benefit. We will let you know about any such changes as soon as possible. Our regulations set out our procedure which we will follow when we need to make any such changes.

When you enrol as a student of the University, your study and time with us will be governed by a framework of regulations, policies and procedures, which form the basis of your agreement with us. These include regulations regarding the assessment of your course, academic integrity, your conduct (including attendance) and disciplinary procedure, fees and finance and compliance with visa requirements (where relevant). It is important that you familiarise yourself with these as you will be asked to agree to abide by them when you join us as a student. You will find a guide to the key terms here, where you will also find links to the full text of each of the regulations, policies and procedures referred to.

The Higher Education Funding Council for England is the principal regulator for the University.

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