Engineering (PhD)

2020-21 (also available for 2019-20, 2021-22)

This course is eligible for Doctoral loan funding. Find out more.

Start date

21 September 2020

13 January 2021

26 April 2021

Duration

The maximum duration for a full-time PhD is 3 years (36 months) with an optional submission pending (writing up period) of 12 months.

Sometimes it may be possible to mix periods of both full-time and part-time study.

Application deadlines

For PGR start date January 2020

29 November 2019

For PGR start date April 2020

11 February 2020

For PGR start date September 2020

02 July 2020

About the research degree

A PhD is the highest academic award for which a student can be registered. This programme allows you to explore and pursue a research project built around a substantial piece of work, which has to show evidence of original contribution to knowledge.

A PhD is a programme of research, culminating in the production of a large-scale piece of written work in the form of a research thesis that should not normally exceed 80,000 words (excluding ancillary data).

Completing a PhD can give you a great sense of personal achievement and help you develop a high level of transferable skills which will be useful in your subsequent career, as well as contributing to the development of knowledge in your chosen field.

You are expected to work to an approved programme of work including appropriate programmes of postgraduate study (which may be drawn from parts of existing postgraduate courses, final year degree programmes, conferences, seminars, masterclasses, guided reading or a combination of study methods).

You will be appointed a main supervisor who will normally be part of a supervisory team, comprising up to three members to advise and support you on your project.

Entry requirements

The normal level of attainment required for entry is:

  • A Master’s degree or an honours degree (2:1 or above) or equivalent, in a discipline appropriate to the proposed programme to be followed, or appropriate research or professional experience at postgraduate level, which has resulted in published work, written reports or other appropriate evidence of accomplishment.

If your first language is not English, you will need to meet the minimum requirements of an English Language qualification. The minimum for IELTS is 6.0 overall with no element lower than 5.5, or equivalent will be considered acceptable. Read more about the University’s entry requirements for students outside of the UK on our Where are you from information pages.

What can I research?

There are several research topics available for this degree. See below examples of research areas including an outline of the topics, the supervisor, funding information and eligibility criteria:

Outline

The project looks at using inverse problem approach to develop turbo-machines such as compressors, turbines and pumps for better efficiency, operation and reliability. State of the art numerical, analytical and experimental techniques will be used for such purposes.

Funding

Please see our Research Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Our standard University deadlines apply. Please see our Deadlines for Applications page to find out more.

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

The project will develop an artificial intelligent (AI) monitoring approach based on Convolutional Neural Network(CNN). Rather than conventional vibroacoutic data, remote thermal images will be used as the main input to map to the CFD analysis results, such a model can be more generic as the data more robust to various uncertainties such as the noise and signal paths in vibration measurements. Once the CNN model is calibrated with both experimental and CFD datasets under various operating conditions of a machine, it can be implemented online for abnormal detection, and then aided by CFD analysis to identify the fault sources and severity offline, thus leading to engineering interoperations of the AI results and wide generalisation and advancements of AI algorithms in the fields of condition monitoring. Pumps and compressors, which are of main equipment in different process industries, will be based on to develop such AI based digital twin monitoring system.

Funding

Please see our Research Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

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Supervisors

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Outline

Conventional measurements such as shaft encoder based instantaneous angular speed (IAS), contact accelerometer based translational vibrations often suffer from poor signal to noise ratio and high cost for deployment. Recent advancement in high speed cameras offer opportunities to visualise the dynamic behaviours of rotors in both rotational and translational directions, leading to a wealthy of information for diagnostics with more cost-effectiveness. The project will focus on developing techniques to extract relative diagnostic information of a rotor based on images from high speed cameras. Both a first law model and an artificial intelligent (AI) model will be investigated to gain the dynamic behaviours of images under various common faults for both linear and nonlinear rotors. The model residuals between the two models will be used as the references for online fault detection and diagnostics.

Low speed Wind turbine, marine power trains, cranes, and compressors in different process industries will be the targeted applications in terms of the digital twin monitoring system.

Funding

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Deadline

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Supervisors

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Outline

Wind farm efficiency is somewhat determined by turbine efficiency, which in tum depends upon wake effects. Turbines situated wholly or partially in the wake of leading turbines are severely restricted in their efficiency, according to size, wind speed and direction and spacing between turbines. The aim of the project is to create a semi-analytical model of air flow behind a horizontal axis wind turbine, principally for use by wind farm designers in the industry. Current models are either too crude to be of certain value or too sophisticated (or time­ consuming) to be incorporated into iterative turbine placement design schemes or software. The most common and crudest model still in use was devised in 1983. Applicants will need a sound Mechanical or Energy Engineering background and a good understanding of the near field aerodynamics of a horizontal axis wind turbine. The project requires a very numerate approach and a good background in applications of mathematics would also be required. For calibration and validation of the model a number of simulations using Computational Fluid Dynamics will be necessary and applicants should be well versed in this type of work, preferably using ANSYS Fluent or similar software.

Funding

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Deadline

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Supervisors

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Outline

The project will investigate the intelligence for the diagnosis of the abnormal machinery in different processing industries such as petrochemical and steel production lines, which are often of a large-scale with multiple machines and high risk environments.

A robot with airborne acoustic arrays will be developed to build a cost effect monitoring platform for such scenarios. Specifically, the arrays will be automatically tuned for different purposes. When the robot patrols in a defined route the array will be configured automatically with large dimensions to scan large area for abnormal sounds. Once an abnormal sound is detected the array will be reconfigured based on sound directions and spectrum so that the acoustic information can not only direct the robot to move closer to the abnormal sources but also adaptively refine the information to identify the root and cause of the faults detected. The key technologies will be researched in the directions of sound beam forming, wavelet based denoising, cross modulation spectrum analysis and intelligent algorithms along with the new advances in the topic of indoor robot positioning.

Funding

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Deadline

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Supervisors

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Outline

Renewable energy is an essential source for harnessing natural forces such as wind energy in an age which is very conscious of the environmental effects of burning fossil fuels, and where sustainability is an ethical norm. Therefore, the focus is currently on both the adequacy of long-term energy supply, as well as the environmental implications of particular sources. In that regard, the near certainty of costs being imposed on carbon dioxide emissions in developed countries has profoundly changed the economic outlook of clean energy sources. Wind turbines have vastly been developed in recent decades due to technology becoming more advanced. Since there is a continuous exhaustion of fossil fuels, it is of high interest with government encouragement to utilise wind technology. Wind turbines are currently advancing into cross-flow vertical axis operation, whereby research has shown a significant increase in performance compared to existing technologies. The need for sustainable energy sources becomes greater each year due to the continued depletion of fossil fuels and the resulting energy crisis. Solutions to this problem are potentially in the form of wind turbines, for sustainable urban environment, that have been receiving increased support. At present, a number of wind turbines have been developed that show significant increase in performance compared to existing technologies.

Funding

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Deadline

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Supervisors

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Outline

Multi component and multiphase mixture flows take place through a number of industrial stems and contribute to a number of processes. Some practical examples of such flows are solid-liquid flow, solid-gas flow, solid-liquid-gas flow, oil - water flow etc. Some of the most common industries where these flows are encountered are Nuclear Industry, Mining Industry, and Chemical Industry etc. The operation, monitoring and control of these flows need detailed knowledge about the flow characteristics of individual components and individual phases. The problem becomes especially complex if the flows are taking place through complex geometries for example helical pipes, elbows valves etc. Through this project novel techniques will be developed to understand local flow features associated with individual components and phases and integrating this information to develop design tools/standards for these processes. The special computational/experimental techniques developed will enable quantification of interphase interaction mechanism. It is expected that the work carried out under this project will enable removal of empiricism embedded in design methodologies to a large extent. It will further allow development of methodologies to trouble free operation and energy use optimisation for such systems.

Funding

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Deadline

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Supervisors

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Outline

A prilling tower is an integral part of any fertilizer plant. A hot fluid (normally urea) is sprayed from a nozzle at the top of the tower forming droplets of urea. These droplets fall under the action of gravity, releasing their energy content, and hence, forming solid prills of urea, which is extensively used as a fertilizer. It is often seen that a lot of the prills formed at the base of the tower doesn't have enough strength to remain in the form of a prill; hence, they disintegrate into powder, wasting an excessive amount of the product. This happens because of ineffective cooling in the tower. The current research work will look into the dynamic of vortex rings for effective cooling purposes within a prilling tower. Vortex rings are inherent in nature and have been a topic of interest for almost a millennium. The urge to utilise vortex rings for multi-purpose applications, such as in cooling of urea droplets in a prilling tower, has led to the development of various types of vortex rings. However, in-depth analysis of the flow phenomena associated with vortex rings is still very little known. This study will investigate the dynamics of a vortex ring's generation, propagation and its ultimate dissipation within a prilling tower. The effect of the geometrical, flow and fluid parameters on the rolling-up of the fluid's shear layers will be analysed using a number of analytical, experimental and numerical techniques. It is expected that this study will result into a practical device that can be installed on the top of the prilling tower, which can enhance the cooling process, hence substantially reducing the waste powder.

Funding

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Deadline

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Supervisors

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Outline

A hardware security primitives is a physical computing device that provides hardened, tamper-resistant hardware-based cryptographic security. True Random numbers find applications in a variety of fields, including cryptography, to provide security in modern systems for confidentiality, authentication, electronic commerce, etc. This work will explore the development of a digital system to generate random numbers that are synthesized and implemented on an FPGA device using stochastic algorithms. The student needs to design algorithms for generating random numbers. The algorithm needs to be neural network-based, designed using hardware description language (HDL), and implemented on the FPGA. The generated random numbers need to be collected back to the computer for analysis. NIST statistical tests need to be used to prove of the quality of randomness.

Funding

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Deadline

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Supervisors

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Outline

Most polymers are limited in their scope of use as a replacement for metals due to the differences in material properties such as strength, thermal expansion, creep, brittleness etc. In order to achieve the required properties, the components need to be redesigned to take the different material properties into account. To allow accurate design analysis, these properties need to be characterised and suitable mathematical models defined. The project will include characterisation of materials with suitable bulk properties to include the variable properties which can be used to improve the performance of the end product, such as polymer chain or reinforcing strand alignment. If a suitable constitutive model is not available, then the relevant mathematical modelling will need to be undertaken to provide the basis for design analysis. This will need to take into account the proposed manufacturing method, which may have influences on the final localised properties of the material. The models developed can then be used to design components which will be tested under typical operating conditions to validate their suitability for replacement of metal components. The student will need a thorough understanding of polymeric materials and non-linear modelling techniques, and preferably some experience of test methodologies.

Funding

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Deadline

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Supervisors

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Outline

Infrastructure systems consist of a number of sub-systems carrying a wide variety of solid-liquid-gaseous materials. Failure of one of the sub-systems may result in release of these materials in an uncontrolled manner. Risk mitigation strategies need to be designed keeping variety of leak scenarios. Furthermore, an array of sensors is needed to provide dispersion characteristics through a well-developed formulation. The information provided through such methods is limited in scope and accuracy in the present work a CFD based solution algorithm will be developed that integrates pre-developed flow scenarios with sensor array information to provide qualitative and quantitative pollutant dispersion characteristics. The developed system will be capable of informing real time pollution dispersion characteristics and will help in developing risk mitigation strategies.

Funding

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Deadline

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Supervisors

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Outline

In the oil-gas fields, slurry flow, gas-in-water two phase flows, and oil-gas-water three phase flows are frequently encountered. Generally, the measurement of volumetric flow rate for each phase is of most interest, especially in subsea oil-gas production applications, where it is essential to obtain oil, water and gas flow rates in inclined oil wells. The problem of how to accurately measure these flow parameters for such complicated flow phenomena, without using expensive test separators and intrusive technique, is a major challenge for the industry. Most conventional multiphase flow meters have severe limitations regarding types of flow and their measurement reliability. Some useful techniques containing radioactive sources are available but they are expensive and potential harmful to humans. Thus, the new developed system will be capable of measuring the local volume fraction local distribution and local velocity distributions of each phase based on tomographic techniques that does not contain a radioactive source.

Funding

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Deadline

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Supervisors

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Outline

The UK Government's Made Smarter review (2017) observed, "The automation of manufacturing processes, coupled with real-time process monitoring and re-engineering, can result in radical improvements in cost, efficiency and accuracy, allowing work to move back to the UK". This project is a direct response, and should prepare the successful candidate for a productive and stimulating career in what promises to be one of the fastest-evolving areas of automation and advanced manufacturing.

The studentship will be based at Huddersfield's Laboratory for Ultra Precision Surfaces, in a new building at one of the Government's major research labs - the SciTech Daresbury campus near Warrington. The student will be immersed in a highly stimulating environment, as part of a growing strategic-partnership between the two organisations and other collaborators. Supervision will be provided by Huddersfield's process-expert (Walker) based at Daresbury, and Al-expert (McCluskey) on-campus at Huddersfield.

The project will utilise advanced robotic equipment and measuring instruments for processing ultraprecision surfaces. At these extreme precisions, processes fall short of perfect-predictability, demanding repeated process measurement cycles to converge on specification, which drives manufacturing risk, cost and time. It also requires highly-skilled operators to make process decisions, who are in declining supply worldwide. The core objective is thus to enhance process-predictability. Surfaces are inaccessible for measurement during processing, so indirect diagnostic-data related to removing material will be monitored. Opportunities abound for the student to contribute to data-harvesting hardware & software, and process-trials, depending on personal skills and interest.

In principle, it should be possible to derive instantaneous removal-rates from real-time data. If so, integrating these rates could give estimates of accumulating removal-depth over the surface, throughout each process-step. At the end of a step, predicted-removal could be compared with direct surface-measurements, giving information to refine the prediction. In reality, the underlying relationships are highly complex, due to interplay of physical and chemical mechanisms at atomic scales. The project's approach will be to amass comprehensive real-time data, alongside post-process measurements, with Al techniques developed to seek meaningful relationships underlying the data. Once established, the project will investigate how the real-time data can be used to make decisions 'on the fly' to keep processing on-track, improving convergence, reducing defects, and decreasing manufacturing time and cost.

Beyond this, the data will undoubtedly reveal new insights into fundamental mechanisms of processes and why variability occurs - which could prove a fertile research-area in its own right.

Funding

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Deadline

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Supervisors

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Outline

This research aims at tackling the current challenges in AM by introducing novel in-process optical sensing tools for dynamic surface measurement, and real-time data analysis methods for surface assessment. A fast 3D fringe projection system with the ability to achieve simultaneous 3D shape acquisition, reconstruction and display in real time will be developed and implemented for in-process AM process. These innovations could advance fundamental understanding of AM processes, and ultimately lead to systematic tools to control the end-product performance of AM.

The main objectives of this proposed research are: 1) develop dynamic optical sensing system that acquires 3D topography for in-process AM. 2) achieve real-time 3D reconstruction by developing novel computational methods including using advanced graphics-processing unit (GPU). 3) develop novel methods for system calibration and surface reconstruction methods to achieve desired measurement accuracy. 4) develop real-time surface quality assessment method for AM process surface characterization. 5) system verification, validation and experimental study.

Funding

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Deadline

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Supervisors

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Outline

This research aims at tackling the current challenges in AM by introducing novel in-process optical sensing tools for dynamic surface measurement, and real-time data analysis methods for surface assessment. A fast 3D fringe projection system with the ability to achieve simultaneous 3D shape acquisition, reconstruction and display in real time will be developed and implemented for in-process AM process. These innovations could advance fundamental understanding of AM processes, and ultimately lead to systematic tools to control the end-product performance of AM.

The main objectives of this proposed research are: 1) develop dynamic optical sensing system that acquires 3D topography for in-process AM. 2) achieve real-time 3D reconstruction by developing novel computational methods including using advanced graphics-processing unit (GPU). 3) develop novel methods for system calibration and surface reconstruction methods to achieve desired measurement accuracy. 4) develop real-time surface quality assessment method for AM process surface characterization. 5) system verification, validation and experimental study

Funding

Please see our Research Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

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Supervisors

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Outline

Material at high temperature suffers creep damage resulting in the failure of its structural integrity. The main cause for such failure is due to cavitation at grain boundary for most of the engineering alloys, but the current research and knowledge is primarily empirical and phenomenological lack of the scientific understanding. This project will further develop and apply the mesoscopic approach FEA simulation of creep damage at grain boundary level.

The prototype of the software has been nearly developed, but its applications have not been seriously perused. This project aims to produce parametric study to yield the insight knowledge of the local interaction and the grain boundary creep cavitation and damage. The result will provide a more accurate understanding of the cavitation damage at grain boundary level. * https://pure.hud.ac.uk/en/publications/development-of-the-fe-in-house-procedure-for-creep-damage-simulat

Funding

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Deadline

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Supervisors

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Outline

Fear learning has been a strong source of inspiration for developing flexible and adaptive artificial intelligence in electronic systems. The project aims at developing a robot movement following an unexpected event that induces fear. The work will study spiking neural networks based controller for driving the robot, establishing a variety of tasks, and its intelligent modifications to adapt to a fearful situation. The robot models need to be designed in an FPGA (Field Programmable Array devices) using a standard HDL (hardware description language). The robotic platforms preferably would a raspberry-pi based, which interacts with the FPGA over a WIFi connection.

Funding

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Deadline

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Supervisors

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Outline

In this project the use of aerodynamic bearings to support the rotor shaft in automotive turbochargers will be investigated. The proposed bearing is supported by a metal foil structure when the shaft rotation is insufficient to generate the aerodynamic forces required to make the bearing self-supporting. The project will include:

• Investigation of the operational requirements for automotive turbocharger rotor bearings comprising load, stiffness and damping characteristics, operating conditions including temperature, shaft speed, gas and inertial loading and importantly, bearing and shaft sizes.

•Development of the multi-physics numerical models required to simulate the aerodynamic effect, the interaction of the generated air film with the metal foil support structure and the damping characteristics provided by friction between the components of the foil support structure.

•Generation of experimental data to validate the numerical models including the design and manufacture of a bearing test rig.

•Production of characteristic load, stiffness and damping curves for foil backed aerodynamic bearings using the validated numerical model.

•Use of a constrained optimization approach to identify the range of feasible bearing designs for automotive applications.

•Modification of an existing hydrodynamic turbocharger bearing housing to use an example aerodynamic bearing and demonstrate the bearing’s feasibility on an engine test bed.

Funding

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Deadline

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Outline

Scarcity of fossil fuels and rapid escalation in the energy prices around the world is affecting efficiency of established modes of cargo transport within transportation industry. Extensive research is being carried out on improving efficiency of existing modes of cargo transport, as well as to develop alternative means of transporting goods. One such alternative method can be through the use of energy contained within fluid flowing in pipelines in order to transfer goods from one place to another. Although the concept of using fluid pipelines for transportation purposes has been in practice for more than a millennium now, but the detailed knowledge of the flow behaviour in such pipelines is still a subject of active research. This is due to the fact that most of the studies conducted on transporting goods in pipelines are based on experimental measurements of global flow parameters, and only a rough approximation of the local flow behaviour within these pipelines has been reported. With the emergence of sophisticated analytical tools and the use of high performance computing facilities being installed throughout the globe, it is now possible to simulate the flow conditions within these pipelines and get better understanding of the underlying flow phenomena

Funding

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Outline

Three-dimensional (3D) sensing for specular objects is required in many applications in research and industry. And most of the surfaces are high precision, inconvenient to measure. A practical method to measure specular surfaces is phase measurement deflectometry. Traditional deflectometry has been used as a 3D object reconstruction method for surfaces with weak (i.e., large radius of curvature) convex or concave surfaces. A full aperture optical surface test of a general convex surface has not been achieved.The proposed research project aims to develop an infinitive multi-sensor deflectometry system for general convex or freeform specular surface measurement. The proposed project will be able to measure the full aperture of convex surfaces. You are expected to develop new calibration methods and algorithms as well as the phase calculation algorithms for the infinitive multi-sensor deflectometry.

Funding

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Outline

The project looks at using inverse problem approach to develop complex flow handling systems such as pipings, valves, radiators, heat exchanges for better effieciency, operation and reliability. These fluid handling systems may be handling single or multiphase flow systems. State of the art numerical, analytical and experimental techniques will be used for such purposes.

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Outline

The project looks at using inverse problem approach to design various electro-mechanical components used in industrial applications such as wind turbines with generators, marine turbines with power units, wave energy systems with power units for better efficiency, operation and reliability. State of the art numerical, analytical and experimental techniques will be used for such purposes.

Funding

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Outline

This project looks at using inverse problem approach to develop renewable energy systems such as wind turbines, marine turbines, wave energy systems, thermosyphons for better efficiency, operation and reliability. State of the art numerical, analytical and experimental techniques will be used for such purposes.

Funding

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Outline

This project will deliver a code for inverse design of blade surface for different climatic conditions. The wind turbine systems incorporating these blades will be expected to be effective in extreme weather conditions. The main benefit of this work will be to increase the efficiency of operation of wind turbines in cold regions which will also contribute to the improvement of turbine safety and lifetime.

Funding

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Supervisors

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Outline

Material at high temperature suffers creep damage resulting in the failure of its structural integrity. For most engineering alloys, the primary cause for such failure is the cavitation at grain boundary, but the current research and knowledge is primarily empirical and phenomenological lack of the scientific support. This project will continue and expand the recent breakthrough in modelling of creep cavitation and creep rupture led by Dr Qiang Xu. It aims to aims to provide the better understanding of the cavitation and rupture processes by multiscale approach and correlating to other material research. It is anticipated to produce international excellence/leading quality output. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09603409.2017.1388603 & https://pure.hud.ac.uk/en/publications/modelling-of-creep-deformation-and-fracture

Funding

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Outline

The project will investigate modulation signal spectrum (MSB) analysis for the demodulation of cyclo-stationary effects at different high frequency resonance modes for monitoring the conditions of bearing and blades inside machine houses. Such bearings often operating at high temperatures such as gas turbines and large diesel engines, which is very challenge to be monitored. The research will investigate the broadband shift behaviours due to tribological effects between the sliding of bearing components. Then corresponding tri-axial responses measured by MEMS sensors at the free end of the rotors will be mapped to ones with low order stationarity and followed by MSB based noise suppression and nonlinear feature enhancements. Based on the behaviour of axial and radial responses, the modal response behaviours are characterised and subsequently based on for diagnosing the lubricity of defects of the internal bearings.

The techniques will be achieved with low cost MEMS accelerometers and can be deployed to monitor wide range of machines such as motors, aircraft engines, pumps, compressors and so on.

Funding

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Outline

Material at high temperature suffers creep damage resulting in the failure of its structural integrity. The main cause for such failure is due to cavitation at grain boundary for most of the engineering alloys, but the current research and knowledge is primarily empirical and phenomenological lack of the scientific understanding. This project will work on the development of the methodology and its application to creep cavitation damage model at grain boundary, for high Cr alloy. The result will provide a more accurate presentation and modelling of the cavitation damage. * https://pure.hud.ac.uk/en/publications/development-of-the-fe-in-house-procedure-for-creep-damage-simulat

Funding

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Outline

The vibration characteristics of rotors supported by bearings will be significantly affected by bearing clearances which are often arisen due to inevitable light wear during services along with thermal effects. Such clearance induced vibration often leads to pre-matured faults to various rotor systems such as wind turbines, gas turbines and aircrafts.

The clearance in bearings will introduce non-smooth and discontinuous nonlinearities in the system which makes it difficult to predict the dynamics of the rotor and develop effective fault diagnostic approaches. The aim of this project is to establish the analysis model of such systems and to solve the nonlinear dynamics using appropriate methodologies. Experimental test rig will be designed to validate the theoretical observations and nonlinear uncertainties due to incipient changes in the clearances and misalignments. It will lead to accurate signal processing tools to monitor the fault of clearance.

The project will require a good background of mechanical engineering. Vibration and dynamics are more suitable. Good theoretical background and implementation skills of numerical simulations using Matlab/Simulink and other software packages will be appreciated.

Wind turbine, aircraft engines, marine power trains, and compressors in different process industries will be the targeted applications in terms of the digital twin monitoring system.

Funding

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Deadline

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Supervisors

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Outline

Material at high temperature suffers creep damage resulting in the failure of its structural integrity. The main cause for such failure is due to cavitation at grain boundary for most of the engineering alloys, but the current research and knowledge is primarily empirical and phenomenological lack of the scientific understanding. This project will continue and expand the recent breakthrough in modelling of creep cavitation and creep rupture led by Dr Qiang Xu. It aims to develop further the mathematics method for and apply to more accurately on the cavitation process with further improved accuracy. It is anticipated to produce international excellence/leading quality output. The experimental data to be utilized will be taken from primarily from X-ray Synchrotron measurement such as from Spring-8 (Japan) or ESRF (EC), et al. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09603409.2017.1388603 & https://pure.hud.ac.uk/en/publications/modelling-of-creep-deformation-and-fracture

Funding

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Outline

Additive manufacturing (AM) is expected to have a profound impact on the way manufacturers make almost any product. It has already made transformation improvements to productivity and opportunity exists to go further. Surfaces generated by AM methods are normally complex and high dynamic in terms of surface reflection and diffusion. Currently 3D vision, photogrammetry, fringe projection and deflectometry are widely used for surface shape measurement. However due to complex of the AM processed surfaces none of the above mentioned method can satisfy the demand of the AM processed surface measurement. A multi-sensor intelligent measurement system for 3D high dynamic complex surface measurement is proposed. The system combines fringe projection, photogrammetry and deflectometry system to tackle the difficult of high dynamic and complex surface shape measurement. You are expected to: 1) develop the calibration methods for the system 2) develop artificial intelligent methods to select the best measurement system according the surface under test
3) develop data fusion algorithms to combine the data sets from multi sensors 4) verification of the measurement results and the multi-sensor measurement system

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How to apply

Outline

This exciting project is for clean energy passionate candidates, as it will develop design and control methods for microgrid (neighborhoods) and Nano-girds (fully electrified large buildings). The project will consider the integration of 100% green generation mix supported by different energy storage technologies. The project will consider the feasibility of both the technical and economic dimensions of these energy systems. The candidate is expected to publish the developed solutions and the obtained results in top tier journals and conferences.

Funding

Please see our Research Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Our standard University deadlines apply. Please see our Deadlines for Applications page to find out more.

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

The aim of this project is to provide a robust methodology for simulating the interaction between failed wheels in turbochargers and the housings designed to contain them. The project will require the use of advanced numerical simulation techniques and the acquisition of validation data by experimental means. The project will include:

•Investigation of the mechanical properties of wheel and housing materials over the range of typical operating temperatures.

•Development of a data bank of burst wheel configurations (i.e. size and shape of fragments) together with wheel speed and materials. This will be based on historical data held at Huddersfield.

•Expansion of the wheel failure data bank based on continued wheel testing.

•Development of experimental techniques to record the burst event and capture wheel fragments following burst to prevent secondary damage.

•Development of finite element models to simulate impact of the wheel fragments with the turbocharger housing. These models will allow for fragments of a range of sizes and shapes, a range of wheel speeds and variable relative position of fragments and housing features at the moment of burst.

•Use of the finite element models combined with stochastic analysis to determine the probability of worst case scenarios occurring.

Funding

Please see our Research Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Our standard University deadlines apply. Please see our Deadlines for Applications page to find out more.

Supervisors

How to apply

Outline

The aim of the research work is to develop an inverse design methodology to develop a unique surface profile for a required functional performance (flow behaviour) and hence it will involve development of an algorithm to generate surface profiles from geometrical parameters characterising the surface as well as develop molecular flow model for flow near the wall surface having artificially created roughness and establish quantitative dependence of surface parameters with flow features very close to the wall. Furthermore development of computational fluid dynamic simulations (continuum based) for flow over wall surface and establish quantitative dependence of surface roughness parameters with flow features away from the wall will be an essential part of this project.

Funding

Please see our Research Scholarships page to find out about funding or studentship options available.

Deadline

Our standard University deadlines apply. Please see our Deadlines for Applications page to find out more.

Supervisors

How to apply

We offer supervision to PhD level in a wide range of areas where we are carrying out state of the art research.

The School of Computing and Engineering has three institutes and a number of research centres and groups that cover a diverse range of topics within Mechanical and Electronic Engineering:

[*] [Institute of Railway Research|http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/researchcentres/irr/]

[*] [Turbocharger Research Institute|http://www.hud.ac.uk/tri/]

[*] [Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Advanced Metrology|http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/researchcentres/cimam/]

[*] [Institute for Accelerator Applications|http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/researchcentres/iiaa/]

[*] [Centre for Efficiency and Performance Engineering|http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/researchcentres/cepe/]

[*] [Centre for Precision Technologies|http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/researchcentres/cpt/]

[*] [Adaptive Music Technologies Research Group|http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/researchcentres/amtrg/]

[*] [Energy, Emissions and the Environment Group|http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/researchcentres/eeerg/]

[*] [Condition Monitoring and Diagnosis Group|http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/researchcentres/cmdg/]

[*] [Measurement and Data Analysis Group|http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/researchcentres/mdag/]

[*] [Electron Microscopy and Materials Analysis Group|http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/researchcentres/emma/]

[*] [Automotive and Marine Engineering Research Group|http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/researchcentres/ameg/]

[*] [Music Technology and Production Research Group|http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/researchcentres/mtprg/]

[*] [Systems Engineering Research Group|http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/researchcentres/serg/]

To find out more about the research we conduct, take a look at our Research, Innovation and Skills webpages, where you will find information on each research area. To find out about our staff visit ‘Our experts’ which features profiles of all our academic staff.

Researcher Environment

The University of Huddersfield has a thriving research community made up of over 1,350 postgraduate research students. We have students studying on a part-time and full-time basis from all over the world with around 43% from overseas and 57% from the UK.

Research plays an important role in informing all our teaching and learning activities. Through undertaking research our staff remain up-to-date with the latest developments in their field, which means you develop knowledge and skills which are current and relevant to your specialist area.

[Find out more about our research staff and centres|http://www.hud.ac.uk/research/]

Student support

At the University of Huddersfield, you'll find support networks and services to help you get ahead in your studies and social life. Whether you study at undergraduate or postgraduate level, you'll soon discover that you're never far away from our dedicated staff and resources to help you to navigate through your personal student journey. Find out more about all our support services.

Important information

We will always try to deliver your course as described on this web page. However, sometimes we may have to make changes to aspects of a course or how it is delivered. We only make these changes if they are for reasons outside of our control, or where they are for our students' benefit. We will let you know about any such changes as soon as possible. Our regulations set out our procedure which we will follow when we need to make any such changes.

When you enrol as a student of the University, your study and time with us will be governed by a framework of regulations, policies and procedures, which form the basis of your agreement with us. These include regulations regarding the assessment of your course, academic integrity, your conduct (including attendance) and disciplinary procedure, fees and finance and compliance with visa requirements (where relevant). It is important that you familiarise yourself with these as you will be asked to agree to abide by them when you join us as a student. You will find a guide to the key terms here, along with the Student Protection Plan, where you will also find links to the full text of each of the regulations, policies and procedures referred to.

The Office for Students (OfS) is the principal regulator for the University.