Architecture/Architecture (International) (RIBA Part 1) BA(Hons)

2019-20 (also available for 2018-19)

Start date

23 September 2019

Duration

3 years full-time

Entry requirements

A Level - AAB

BTEC - DDD

See full entry requirements

UCAS Code

K100

Places available (subject to change)

70

Phone contact: +44 (0)1484 472281

About the course

Experiencing buildings rather than just looking at photographs in a lecture theatre gives you a better understanding of how space is used. So if you choose the international strand of this course, you’ll have the opportunity to go on an extended field study visit to a non-European location.** We want to give you the skills to progress to the next stage of your architectural career.

There are so many inspiring buildings and environments – not just in Europe, but across the world. This course takes a unique approach to architecture by enabling you to look at places and cultures on an international scale. We’ll look at different regions and the cultural context behind their architecture, and give you the chance to create your own designs in response.

We focus on helping you to create designs that are sustainable, inspiring and humane. And we’ll also give you the chance to develop your skills through the latest technology, such as Building Information Modelling (BIM).

There are two sides to the course. Architecture explores the complex regional, cultural, ethical and environmental issues that underlie the built environment. And Architecture (International) gives you a chance to put into practice what you’ve learned through an extended field trip to a location beyond Europe. Recent graduates have visited Vietnam, Malaysia, India and China.

If you do choose to take the international option in your final year, the extended field trip is compulsory and you’ll have to fund your own place. Just to give you an idea, the average cost of the trip in the past few years has been around £1,400 per student.

The course is recognised by the Architects Registration Board (ARB), the body that regulates the architects’ profession in the UK. That’s good news if you’re hoping to continue on to be an architect, as you have to register with the ARB to be able to practise using the title ‘architect’ in the UK.

It’s also validated by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA). In fact, if you graduate you will then gain exemption from RIBA’s Part 1 Professional Examinations. That’s the first of three examinations you need to pass to qualify and register as an architect, all of which you can undertake here at Huddersfield. So you could be well on the way towards your chosen profession.

Architecture is a very creative subject; our students are innovative, explorative, pioneering, good at drawing and communicating. Our graduates develop a deep understanding of their responsibility to people, to clients, to users, to places, to society, to the environment and to the planet. It’s also a fantastic grounding for so many possible directions.

Carl Meddings

Carl Meddings, Subject Leader

Course Detail

Core modules:

Technology 1: An Introduction to Architectural Technology

This module introduces three parallel strands of Architectural Technology: Structures Through an exploration of structural equilibrium and the assessment of stress and deformation in simple elements, the module will discuss the properties of building materials and the implications for element design. Buildings Fabric Design Common materials, assemblies and construction techniques used to achieve safe, environmentally sound and aesthetic constructions will be explained and exemplified. Common failures in materials and assemblies will be highlighted. Environmental Design A building’s fabric and services combine to create an internal environment that the occupants find comfortable and pleasurable. This extends to physiological (and psychological), thermal, visual and acoustic comfort, and the health and wellbeing of the occupants. You will consider how responsive design (both passive and interactive) can be utilised to provide the internal conditions necessary for comfort. All of the above topics will be considered in relation to sustainable design necessary for protecting internal, local and global environments for both current and future generations. On-line multi choice test of one hour duration 50% / Reflective journal 50%

History and Theory 1: Spatial and Visual Culture

This module has two parallel strands: - An historical overview of Western, Islamic and Oriental architecture from the beginnings of civilisation to the start of the Renaissance. - An introduction to theoretical issues that relate to the manipulation of architectural space and form. Whilst providing background knowledge it seeks to inculcate the idea that history is not a mere catalogue of styles, and that a study of the subject is essential to the designer. Assessment: - Comparative Analysis of Architecture from different historical periods (equivalent in scope to 2,000 words) 50%. - Illustrated analysis of architectural precedent exploring theoretical issues (equivalent in scope to 2,000 words) 50%. To pass the module each piece of coursework must achieve at least a 40% pass mark.

Personal Development 1: An Introduction to Communication Skills

This module is concerned with your personal development as a designer with a specific focus on the introduction and development of basic 2D and 3D drawing, modelling, CAD and graphic techniques. You will be introduced to a range of architectural design and visualisation skills including the use of manual graphic and modelling techniques, the use of CAD and other digital media and the facilities and resources available within the School. The importance of developing good communication skills will be explained. As your skills develop you will be introduced to the notions of active learning and personal development planning. Assessment: - Integrated design development portfolio that demonstrates your ability to explore and present ideas and information (from this and adjacent modules) using a broad range of media and techniques. 60%. - Reflective learning journal that collates development work and other information and resources. 40%.

Design Studio 1: Basic Principles of Design

The module introduces basic principles of architectural composition. The module has particular focus on the relationship between people and space(s). It provides you with a vehicle to explore the process of design and to develop an understanding of its nature, components and effects. The module is delivered across the first 12 teaching weeks of the first year of study and is intended to introduce you to design as an integrative process through the realisation of architectural spaces and forms that satisfy specific and predetermined user requirements. You will develop a body of work in response to projects. This is defined and structured by Module Tutors to promote an exploration of the fundamental elements of architectural components and assemblies. You will be encouraged to apply practical, technical and theoretical skills from adjacent modules. The module will facilitate the development of presentation skills in all forms from spoken presentation at reviews and tutorials to the various and many modes of visual presentation, conceptualisation, prototyping and production. Assessment: The production of a body of work, in the form of physical drawings and models, that demonstrates the manipulation and expression of architectural space and form at an elementary level. 100% Portfolio.

Design Studio 2: Theory and Form

The module explores the basic principles of architectural composition and the relationship between people, space and place. It provides you with a vehicle to explore the process of design and to develop an understanding of its nature, components and effects. The module is delivered across the second 12 teaching weeks of the first year of study and is intended to introduce you to design as an integrative process through the realisation of architectural spaces and forms that satisfy specific and predetermined user requirements. The module takes a broad holistic approach that encompasses diverse and interdependent areas of practice and provides a framework on which you can base your design work in future. In particular the module introduces practical exploration of structural, constructional and environmental technologies and the expression of architectural ideas in relation to human requirements. You will develop a body of work in response to projects. This is defined and structured by Module Tutors to promote an exploration of the fundamental elements of architectural components and assemblies. You will be encouraged to apply practical, technical and theoretical skills from adjacent modules. The module will facilitate the development of presentation skills in all forms from spoken presentation at reviews and tutorials to the various and many modes of visual presentation, conceptualisation, prototyping and production. Assessment: The production of a body of work, in the form of physical drawings and models that explore the principles of architectural composition and the relationship between people, space and place. (word count equivalent to 7000 words) - 100% Portfolio.

29.7% of the study time on this course is spent in lectures, seminars, workshops etc.

The course is delivered using a combination of lectures, seminars, workshops and a series of design studio projects. Studio-based design is central to this course, for which you'll have access to high quality resources in computing and modelling, professional support and tuition. You'll learn through design projects and assignments. All modules in Years 2 and 3 count towards final Honours classification.

You'll be assessed on a combination of your portfolios of design work, written assignments, seminar presentations and classroom tests, individually and in groups.

Your module specification/course handbook will provide full details of the assessment criteria applying to your course.

Feedback (usually written) is normally provided on all coursework submissions within three term time weeks – unless the submission was made towards the end of the session in which case feedback would be available on request after the formal publication of results. Feedback on exam performance/final coursework is available on request after the publication of results.

Entry requirements

AABat A Level or equivalent

136 UCAS tariff points from a combination of Level 3 qualifications

DDD in BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (Art, Design or Construction)

  • Pass in Diploma Foundation Studies in Art and Design combined with A Level or BTEC National qualifications, to total an equivalent of 136 UCAS tariff points.
  • Pass Access to Higher Education Diploma with 45 Level 3 credits at Merit or above.
  • 136 UCAS tariff points from International Baccalaureate qualifications.
  • In addition you must have GCSE English and Maths at grade 4 or above, or grade C or above if awarded under the previous GCSE grading scheme.

If your first language is not English, you will need to meet the minimum requirements of an English Language qualification. The minimum of IELTS 6.0 overall with no element lower than 5.5, or equivalent will be considered acceptable.

Applicants to Architecture courses can come from a very broad range of backgrounds, so other experiences or qualifications will be considered and are encouraged.

Other suitable experience or qualifications will be considered. For further information please see the University's minimum entry requirements.

You will also be required to submit your portfolio for review, followed by a discussion with a tutor, when strong emphasis will be placed on the quality of your creative design portfolio. Your portfolio should contain 10 to 15 pieces of your work which demonstrate a range of creative skills, including 2D and 3D drawing and model making/sculpture. We like to see developmental and sketched material as well as final pieces.

The Barbara Hepworth Building


The new Barbara Hepworth Building at the University of Huddersfield brings together our Art, Design and Architecture programmes under one roof.

The £30million investment embodies all that is current, contemporary and creative. It offers huge potential to act as a catalyst for future connectivity, setting the scene for collaboration and learning.

Due to open in late 2019, our students will experience a completely new way of working, revolutionising partnerships and creative exchanges from their first day of study.

For more information, please visit: hud.ac/edm

Further information

The teaching year normally starts in September with breaks at Christmas and Easter, finishing with a main examination/assessment period around May/June. Timetables are normally available one month before registration. As this is a full-time course, you may have to attend every day of the week.

Your course is made up of modules and each module is worth a number of credits. Each year you study modules to the value of 120 credits, adding up to 360 credits in total for a bachelor’s qualification. These credits can come from a combination of core, compulsory and optional modules but please note that optional modules may not run if we do not have enough students interested.

If you achieve 120 credits for the current stage you are at, you may progress to the next stage of your course, subject to any professional, statutory or regulatory body guidelines.

Placements


If you intend to follow the route to become a qualified architect then, upon successful completion of the degree, through which you’ll attain the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) Part 1 professional qualification, you’ll need to undertake a year working in professional practice before continuing to RIBA Part 2.

We have excellent links with architectural practices around the world and our students have found employment in a wide range of practices, from the smallest architectural firms to the largest, working on a huge variety of projects at home and overseas.

Teaching excellence

  1. Huddersfield is a TEF gold-rated institution delivering consistently outstanding teaching and learning of the highest quality found in the UK (Teaching Excellence Framework, 2017).
  2. We won the first Global Teaching Excellence Award recognising the University’s commitment to world-class teaching and its success in developing students as independent learners and critical thinkers (HEA, 2017).
  3. Here at Huddersfield, you’ll be taught by some of the best lecturers in the country. The University is number one in England for the proportion of staff with teaching qualifications (HESA, 2018).
  4. For the past ten years, we’ve been the UK’s leading university for National Teaching Fellowships too, which rate Britain’s best lecturers. It’s all part of our ongoing drive for teaching excellence, which helps our students to achieve great things too.
  5. We’re unique in the fact that all our permanent teaching staff* have, or are completing, doctorates. This expertise, together with our teaching credentials, means that students here learn from knowledgeable and well-qualified teachers and academics who are at the forefront of their subject area.

*Permanent staff, after probation: some recently appointed colleagues will only obtain recognition in the months after their arrival in Huddersfield, once they have started teaching; research degrees applies to those on contracts of more than half-time.

Student Work

A gallery of work by our Architecture/Architecture (International) (RIBA Part 1) BA(Hons) students and graduates. Click on each image to find out more.
You can see work from across the School of Art, Design and Architecture on our gallery page.

Your career


We know you’re coming to university to undertake your course, meet new people and broaden your horizons. However, we also help you to focus on life after you have graduated to ensure that your hard work pays off and you achieve your ambition.
 
So while you’re here (and even after you graduate) the Careers and Employability Service offer professional help, support and guidance, including industry-supported workshops, careers fairs and one-to-one guidance sessions. Find out more about the Service.
 
* Percentage of graduates from this course who go on to work and/or further study within six months of graduating (DLHE Survey 2014/15).

* Source: DLHE Survey 2014/15

89% Graduates employed*

Student support

At the University of Huddersfield, you'll find support networks and services to help you get ahead in your studies and social life. Whether you study at undergraduate or postgraduate level, you'll soon discover that you're never far away from our dedicated staff and resources to help you to navigate through your personal student journey. Find out more about all our support services.

Important information

We will always try to deliver your course as described on this web page. However, sometimes we may have to make changes as set out below.

Changes to a course you have applied for

If we propose to make a major change to a course that you are holding an offer for, then we will tell you as soon as possible so that you can decide whether to withdraw your application prior to enrolment.

Changes to your course after you enrol as a student

We will always try to deliver your course and other services as described. However, sometimes we may have to make changes as set out below:

Changes to option modules

Where your course allows you to choose modules from a range of options, we will review these each year and change them to reflect the expertise of our staff, current trends in research and as a result of student feedback or demand for certain modules. We will always ensure that you have a range of options to choose from and we will let you know in good time the options available for you to choose for the following year.

Major changes

We will only make major changes to the core curriculum of a course or to our services if it is necessary for us to do so and provided such changes are reasonable. A major change in this context is a change that materially changes the services available to you; or the outcomes, or a significant part, of your course, such as the nature of the award or a substantial change to module content, teaching days (part time provision), classes, type of delivery or assessment of the core curriculum.

For example, it may be necessary to make a major change to reflect changes in the law or the requirements of the University’s regulators; to meet the latest requirements of a commissioning or accrediting body; to improve the quality of educational provision; in response to student, examiners’ or other course evaluators’ feedback; and/or to reflect academic or professional changes within subject areas. Major changes may also be necessary because of circumstances outside our reasonable control, such as a key member of staff leaving the University or being unable to teach, where they have a particular specialism that can’t be adequately covered by other members of staff; or due to damage or interruption to buildings, facilities or equipment.

Major changes would usually be made with effect from the next academic year, but this may not always be the case. We will notify you as soon as possible should we need to make a major change and will carry out suitable consultation with affected students. If you reasonably believe that the proposed change will cause you detriment or hardship we will, if appropriate, work with you to try to reduce the adverse effect on you or find an appropriate solution. Where an appropriate solution cannot be found and you contact us in writing before the change takes effect you can cancel your registration and withdraw from the University without liability to the University for future tuition fees. We will provide reasonable support to assist you with transferring to another university if you wish to do so.

Termination of course

In exceptional circumstances, we may, for reasons outside of our control, be forced to discontinue or suspend your course. Where this is the case, a formal exit strategy will be followed and we will notify you as soon as possible about what your options are, which may include transferring to a suitable replacement course for which you are qualified, being provided with individual teaching to complete the award for which you were registered, or claiming an interim award and exiting the University. If you do not wish to take up any of the options that are made available to you, then you can cancel your registration and withdraw from the course without liability to the University for future tuition fees and you will be entitled to a refund of all course fees paid to date. We will provide reasonable support to assist you with transferring to another university if you wish to do so.

When you enrol as a student of the University, your study and time with us will be governed by a framework of regulations, policies and procedures, which form the basis of your agreement with us. These include regulations regarding the assessment of your course, academic integrity, your conduct (including attendance) and disciplinary procedure, fees and finance and compliance with visa requirements (where relevant). It is important that you familiarise yourself with these as you will be asked to agree to abide by them when you join us as a student. You will find a guide to the key terms here, where you will also find links to the full text of each of the regulations, policies and procedures referred to.

The Higher Education Funding Council for England is the principal regulator for the University.

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