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Chemical Engineering (Top-up) BEng(Hons)

2024-25 (also available for 2025-26)

Places available in clearing. Find out more.
Places available in clearing. Find out more.

Start date

16 September 2024

Duration

1 year full-time

About the course

Reasons to study

  1. It follows the structure of our Year 3 BEng Chemical Engineering, a programme accredited by the Institution of Chemical Engineers (IChemE).
  2. Teaching staff are educated to doctoral level in their respective subject areas and have expertise in specialist areas of chemical engineering.

Isaac Asimov observed “Science can amuse and fascinate us all, but it is engineering that changes the world!” In the past chemical engineering has quietly (or sometimes noisily!) served the material and energy needs of society. But in the 21st century, in the face of global challenges of climate change and fossil fuel depletion, the need is for chemical engineers to change the world by changing the ways in which we meet our needs for food, water, energy and materials. In particular, we need to do this in more joined up ways that produce the right products more cleverly and effectively, understanding the full environmental implications of processing choices, and exploiting interactions for efficiency to give minimum impact and maximum benefit.

  • Chemical engineering can be viewed as the most applied of the applied sciences, and with opportunities to make a difference in the world.
  • Chemical engineers transform the visions of chemists and biochemists into industrial-scale reality, to make the benefits of new products and processes available to the world.
  • Our course is strong on systems thinking and on practical skills, as well as an emphasis on nurturing transferable and employability skills.
  • We offer you the opportunity to gain strong, in-depth and industry-relevant chemical engineering knowledge to help you play a valuable and rewarding role in this industry and beyond.
  • Our teaching staff are educated to doctoral level in their respective subject areas and have expertise in specialist areas of chemical engineering, as well as recognised higher education teaching qualifications and awards for excellent teaching. You'll have the opportunity to gain hands-on experience using scientific instrumentation in our modern chemical sciences labs and pilot-scale rigs in our dedicated chemical engineering labs. So if you’re looking for a career in oil, fine chemicals, materials, food, pharmaceutical and many other industries, this could be just the course for you.

Course detail

Design Project 1

From the IChemE Accreditation Guide: “In order to meet the learning outcomes associated with the systems approach, the design portfolio must include a major design exercise which addresses the complexity issues arising from the interaction and integration of the different parts of a process or system. It is expected that this major project will be undertaken by teams of students and that this will contribute significantly to the development of the students’ transferable skills such as communication and team working.” A minimum of 30 UK credits of Design Project work is required for IChemE accreditation.

Design Project 2

From the IChemE Accreditation Guide: “In order to meet the learning outcomes associated with the systems approach, the design portfolio must include a major design exercise which addresses the complexity issues arising from the interaction and integration of the different parts of a process or system. It is expected that this major project will be undertaken by teams of students and that this will contribute significantly to the development of the students’ transferable skills such as communication and team working.” A minimum of 30 UK credits of Design Project work is required for IChemE accreditation.

Safety Engineering and Process Control

This module provides knowledge and understanding of process control and issues and engineering approach to process safety in chemical industry. The module will also introduce the concept of process control, explain the need for process control, explore applications and develop control strategies for specific problems. This will include the study of P, PI, PD and PID controllers for the control of flow rate, level, pressure and temperature in process plant unit operations, controller tuning strategies, methods for the testing of process plant control systems and advanced control strategies.

Sustainable Industrial Systems

This module encourages you to develop your knowledge and understanding of sustainable development in industrial systems and to provide approaches to design and assess for sustainability. The module also encompasses large scale experimental work relevant to industrial practice in relation to sustainability. It aims to introduce the concepts of sustainability and carbon and water footprints and provide an overview renewable energy processes and carbon capture technologies. It also examines selected examples in detail, looks at process integration methodologies in design for sustainability and introduces techno-economic and life cycle assessments. The module also enables you to gain experience in experimental group work involving large scale equipment relevant to the technologies, industries and methodologies introduced in the module.

The top-up degree taught modules cover more advanced aspects of chemical engineering.

Entry requirements

To find out if you’re eligible to start this course in September 2024 and get more information on how to apply, please see our Clearing pages or call our Clearing Helpline on 0333 987 900001484 472777.

If you’re interested in studying this course in September 2025, please view the 2025-26 course information.

In addition to the academic entry requirements, you will also need:

The admissions process will be in conjunction with other courses of the Chemical Sciences suite.

Applications for this course are considered on a case-by-case basis but typical entry requirements for the Chemical Engineering (Top-up) BEng(Hons) are:

  • you hold an HND or Diploma of Higher Education in Chemical Engineering with an overall average of at least 60%.
  • or, you have passed 240 credits of a Chemical Engineering degree, including at least 120 credits at Level 5 or the equivalent, all modules must be passed with at least 40% and the overall average should be at least 60%.

International entry will normally proceed through formal progression agreements with overseas partner institutions.

Information for the partner institutions: For entry, the student should have been performing at a 1st class level (exact qualifying grades to be determined through liaison with departmental admissions tutors, International Office and partner institution) in their prior undergraduate studies where credit equivalent to Diploma of Higher Education (DipHE) or Higher National Diploma (HND) (equivalent of 120 F-level and 120 I-level credits) and they will be at least 18 years of age by 31st December of the year of entry.

Transfers from other institutions will be considered on an individual basis.

If your first language is not English, you will need to meet the minimum requirements of an English Language qualification. The minimum for IELTS is 6.5 overall with no element lower than 6.0, iGCSE English at grade B, or equivalent. Read more about the University’s entry requirements for students outside of the UK on our Where are you from information pages.

Student support

At the University of Huddersfield, you'll find support networks and services to help you get ahead in your studies and social life. Whether you study at undergraduate or postgraduate level, you'll soon discover that you're never far away from our dedicated staff and resources to help you to navigate through your personal student journey. Find out more about all our support services.

Important information

Although we always try and ensure we deliver our courses as described, sometimes we may have to make changes for the following reasons

When you enrol as a student of the University, your study and time with us will be governed by our terms and conditions, Handbook of Regulations and associated policies. It is important that you familiarise yourself with these as you will be asked to agree to them when you join us as a student. You will find a guide to the key terms here, along with the Student Protection Plan.

Although we always try and ensure we deliver our courses as described, sometimes we may have to make changes for the following reasons

Changes to a course you have applied for but are not yet enrolled on

If we propose to make a major change to a course that you are holding an offer for, then we will tell you as soon as possible so that you can decide whether to withdraw your application prior to enrolment. We may occasionally have to withdraw a course you have applied for or combine your programme with another programme if we consider this reasonably necessary to ensure a good student experience, for example if there are not enough applicants. Where this is the case we will notify you as soon as reasonably possible and we will discuss with you other suitable courses we can transfer your application to. If you do not wish to transfer to another course with us, you may cancel your application and we will refund you any deposits or fees you have paid to us.

Changes to your course after you enrol as a student

Changes to option modules:

Where your course allows you to choose modules from a range of options, we will review these each year and change them to reflect the expertise of our staff, current trends in research and as a result of student feedback or demand for certain modules. We will always ensure that you have an equivalent range of options to that advertised for the course. We will let you know in good time the options available for you to choose for the following year.

Major changes:

We will only make major changes to non-optional modules on a course if it is necessary for us to do so and provided such changes are reasonable. A major change is a change that substantially changes the outcomes, or a significant part of your course, such as the nature of the award or a substantial change to module content, teaching days (part time provision), type of delivery or assessment of the core curriculum. For example, it may be necessary to make a major change to reflect changes in the law or the requirements of the University’s regulators or a commissioning or accrediting body. We may also make changes to improve the course in response to student, examiners’ or other course evaluators’ feedback or to ensure you are being taught current best practice. Major changes may also be necessary because of circumstances outside our reasonable control, such as a key member of staff leaving the University or being unable to teach, where they have a particular specialism that can’t be adequately covered by other members of staff; or due to damage or interruption to buildings, facilities or equipment, or pandemics.

Major changes would usually be made with effect from the next academic year, but may happen sooner in an emergency. We will notify you as soon as possible should we need to make a major change and will carry out suitable consultation. If you reasonably believe that the proposed change will cause you detriment or hardship we will, if appropriate, work with you to try to reduce the adverse effect on you or find an appropriate solution. Where an appropriate solution cannot be found and you contact us in writing before the change takes effect you can cancel your registration and withdraw from the University without liability to the University for future tuition fees. We will provide reasonable support to assist you with transferring to another university if you wish to do so.

In exceptional circumstances, we may, for reasons outside of our control, be forced to discontinue or suspend your course. Where this is the case, a formal exit strategy will be followed in accordance with the student protection plan.

The Office for Students (OfS) is the principal regulator for the University.