Sports Journalism BA(Hons)

2019-20 (also available for 2018-19 and 2017-18)

2018-19 (also available for 2019-20 and 2017-18)

2018-19 (also available for 2017-18)

Magazines, newspapers, TV and radio journalism – we look at all media to develop your broadcasting, writing and journalism skills to be a sports journalist.

It’s not too late to apply for September 2018. Find out more

Start date

17 September 2018

Duration

3 years full-time
4 years inc. placement year

Entry requirements

A Level - BBC

BTEC - DMM

See full entry requirements

UCAS Code

P503

Places available (subject to change)

30

Phone contact: +44 (0)1484 478464

About the course

Sport plays a huge role in today’s media, with sports pages in every newspaper and time in each news bulletin dedicated to the latest matches. If you’re passionate about particular sports or teams, imagine being able to swap your sofa for the press box to get a closer view and to be able to put your views across. This course could help you get there

Everyone loves talking about sport and giving you their opinions. But by learning the techniques of journalism, you could rise above all the chatter to make insightful and informed comments that people will listen to and value. If you’ve got an interest in sport and love talking about it, you could be the ideal candidate to cover its highs and lows across print, broadcast, online and social media.

We’ll introduce you to a range of techniques and genres, covering everything from writing a basic match report to presenting your own TV sports show.

Experienced sports journalists will show you how to write quality copy against a tight deadline. You’ll also have the chance to develop the skills you need to plan and produce TV and radio programmes. And we’ll look at social media too, explaining how you could stand out on some extremely popular platforms.

To give you a good overview of your subject, you’ll also have the chance to study the history of sport in general. We’ll also give you the opportunity to gain vital training in media law and ethics.

While you’re on the course you’ll be taught by tutors who are leading the way in their fields. Writers, broadcasts, academics and researchers all contribute, and our staff regularly work for national newspapers and magazines.

In your final year we’ll ask you to research and write a dissertation on the aspect of the media industry that you’re most interested in. You’ll also be able to choose from a range of modules, from investigative reporting through to the latest innovations in journalism.

Placements


Final year compulsory placements give you the chance to put your skills into practice in the real world. You'll spend up to a third of your final year working with an external client, such as a newspaper, broadcaster or production company, or in the busy press office of a professional football or rugby league side.

The course also offers an optional one-year (48 weeks) work placement after the second year, in the UK or abroad. This will give you the opportunity to gain valuable hands-on experience, insight into your chosen career and open up your graduate employment prospects.

Previous placement providers have included ITV Calendar and Granada, a range of newspapers and magazines, and clubs including Sheffield Wednesday, Rotherham United, Huddersfield Giants and Castleford Tigers.

Going into a working environment once a week taught me the scale of work and planning that goes into Formula One PR. I was given a good level of responsibility, allowing me to learn as I went along, and develop my own style.

tom errington

Tom Errington, Sports Journalism BA(Hons) in 2016

Entry requirements

BBCat A Level

112 UCAS tariff points from a combination of Level 3 qualifications

DMM in BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma

  • Pass Access to Higher Education Diploma with 45 Level 3 credits at Merit or above
  • 112 UCAS tariff points from International Baccalaureate qualifications.

Other suitable experience or qualifications will be considered. For further information please see the University's minimum entry requirements.

Hear from our students


Jess is studying Sports Journalism BA(Hons). She chose Journalism at the University of Huddersfield as it offered the best facilities she'd seen at any Open Day. Watch Jess rehearse in a TV studio as she describes how the University has given her confidence and experience to help pursue a career in television after graduation.

Course Detail

Core modules:

Media and Society

This module offers you training in the academic skills required to be able to work in an undergraduate environment, and to reflect on your learning. In the process it presents you with an overview of various contemporary social issues and possible theoretical approaches to the social role of the mass media. There are two assessed essays.

Writing for the Media

This module introduces you to a range of media and professional writing practices. You will be guided to develop transferable skills for a broad range of media writing. You will analyse material in newspapers, magazines, broadcast outlets and online publications and through progressive writing activities develop and hone your journalistic skills. The module will introduce you to the relationship between the media and the law, and the range of legal provisions and ethical issues which affect media writing practices. You'll be assessed on a series of articles you'll write during the year.

Broadcast Production

The module introduces you to a range of audio and video technologies for making radio and TV. You will be provided with the essential skills needed to produce individual pieces of broadcast journalism, and then you'll work together in groups to make radio and TV programmes in our studios. You'll also write individual reflective reports examining your own work.

Introduction to Public Relations

The module provides you with an introduction to public relations, exploring how it shapes and influences the media through a detailed analysis of print and broadcast news. You'll be introduced to the history of PR and key theoretical models. You will also explore the difference between PR, advertising and marketing. In workshops you will develop practical skills giving you an understanding of the basic operations of the industry. Assessment is through an analytical log, a series of press releases which you'll write, and a group presentation.

Journalism Technologies

You almost certainly use a wide range of social media tools in your own life already, and this module will give you the knowledge to turn that into a more professional understanding of digital media technologies. You'll learn the practical skills to use social and online tools in journalism. You'll explore a range of social media platforms and examine their impact on journalism and the wider media. Assessment is through an online learning log, an analysis of how news outlets use online and social tools, and an original piece of multimedia journalism of your own.

Teaching and assessment

18.45% of the study time on this course is spent in lectures, seminars, workshops etc. You'll learn from professional journalists and academics in lectures, seminars, projects and group work. Assessment of this course will take a variety of forms including written assignments, study logs, examinations, individual and group projects, presentations, practical production, and a dissertation.

Your module specification/course handbook will provide full details of the assessment criteria applying to your course.

Feedback (either written and/or verbal) is normally provided on all coursework submissions within three term time weeks – unless the submission was made towards the end of the session in which case feedback would be available on request after the formal publication of results.

Feedback on exam performance/final coursework is available on request after the publication of results.

Further information

The teaching year normally starts in September with breaks at Christmas and Easter, finishing with a main examination/assessment period around May/June. Timetables are normally available one month before registration. 

Your course is made up of modules and each module is worth a number of credits. Each year you study modules to the value of 120 credits, adding up to 360 credits in total for a bachelor’s qualification. These credits can come from a combination of core, compulsory and optional modules but please note that optional modules may not run if we do not have enough students interested.

If you achieve 120 credits for the current stage you are at, you may progress to the next stage of your course, subject to any professional, statutory or regulatory body guidelines.

Teaching excellence

  1. Huddersfield is a TEF gold-rated institution delivering consistently outstanding teaching and learning of the highest quality found in the UK (Teaching Excellence Framework, 2017).
  2. We won the first Global Teaching Excellence Award recognising the University’s commitment to world-class teaching and its success in developing students as independent learners and critical thinkers (HEA, 2017).
  3. Here at Huddersfield, you’ll be taught by some of the best lecturers in the country. The University is number one in England for the proportion of staff with teaching qualifications (HEFCE, 2016).
  4. For the past ten years, we’ve been the UK’s leading university for National Teaching Fellowships too, which rate Britain’s best lecturers. It’s all part of our ongoing drive for teaching excellence, which helps our students to achieve great things too.
  5. We’re unique in the fact that all our permanent teaching staff* have, or are completing, doctorates. This expertise, together with our teaching credentials, means that students here learn from knowledgeable and well-qualified teachers and academics who are at the forefront of their subject area.

*Permanent staff, after probation: some recently appointed colleagues will only obtain recognition in the months after their arrival in Huddersfield, once they have started teaching; research degrees applies to those on contracts of more than half-time.

Our Students and Graduates

Click on the images below to read more about our current students and graduates work experiences

Your Career


As a journalism graduate you are valued for the range of core journalistic skills you have developed including researching, investigating, interviewing, reporting and writing, in addition to technical skills such as use of video, audio, social and online tools and editing.

*Percentage of graduates from this course who go on to work and / or further study within six months of graduating (Destinations of Leavers Survey 2015/16).

95%Graduates employed*

Student support

At the University of Huddersfield, you'll find support networks and services to help you get ahead in your studies and social life. Whether you study at undergraduate or postgraduate level, you'll soon discover that you're never far away from our dedicated staff and resources to help you to navigate through your personal student journey. Find out more about all our support services.

Important information

We will always try to deliver your course as described on this web page. However, sometimes we may have to make changes as set out below.

We review all optional modules each year and change them to reflect the expertise of our staff, current trends in research and as a result of student feedback. We will always ensure that you have a range of options to choose from and we will let students know in good time the options available for them to choose for the following year.

We will only change core modules for a course if it is necessary for us to do so, for example to maintain course accreditation. We will let you know about any such changes as soon as possible, usually before you begin the relevant academic year.

Sometimes we have to make changes to other aspects of a course or how it is delivered. We only make these changes if they are for reasons outside of our control, or where they are for our students’ benefit. Again, we will let you know about any such changes as soon as possible, usually before the relevant academic year. Our regulations set out our procedure which we will follow when we need to make any such changes.

When you enrol as a student of the University, your study and time with us will be governed by a framework of regulations, policies and procedures, which form the basis of your agreement with us. These include regulations regarding the assessment of your course, academic integrity, your conduct (including attendance) and disciplinary procedure, fees and finance and compliance with visa requirements (where relevant). It is important that you familiarise yourself with these as you will be asked to agree to abide by them when you join us as a student. You will find a guide to the key terms here, where you will also find links to the full text of each of the regulations, policies and procedures referred to.

The Higher Education Funding Council for England is the principal regulator for the University.

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