Environmental and Analytical Science BSc(Hons)

2022-23

Start date

19 September 2022

Duration

3 years full-time
4 years inc. placement year

Entry requirements

A Level - BCC

BTEC - DMM

See full entry requirements

Places available (subject to change)

25

About the course

Understanding the impact of human activities on our environment is essential to protecting it for future generations. The Environmental and Analytical Science BSc(Hons) degree at Huddersfield gives you a comprehensive understanding of Earth's systems and equips you with the skills and knowledge of an analytical scientist.

  • You'll have the chance to study a range of subjects including biogeography, inorganic and organic chemistry, earth processes, landscape and fluvial systems, climate science and sustainability before specialising in your final year.
  • In the third year of the course you’ll have the opportunity to benefit from a work placement. This could help you to gain relevant real-world experience and give you a head start in your chosen career. In the final year you’ll have the chance to develop and hone your independent research skills as part of the research project module.
  • We also firmly believe in ‘learning through doing’ and since fieldwork is an integral part of any environmental scientists training, we’ve embedded field-trips throughout all years of study.
  • All our teaching staff are educated to doctoral level and have expertise in a range of environmental and analytical subject areas.

We’re passionate about the environment at the University of Huddersfield. By studying with us you’ll learn how to analyse and understand our planet from a range of enthusiastic international experts using state of the art equipment and laboratories.

None

Dr Thomas Smyth, Lecturer in Physical Geography

Course detail

Core modules:

Dynamic Living Systems

This introductory module in biogeography defines and explains the major geographic patterns of life on Earth and explores how different terrestrial and oceanic ecosystems are shaped by natural processes and human activity. Some of the planetary processes and nutrient cycles introduced in the Global Earth Cycles module are re-considered in this module from the perspectives of contemporary and prospective global patterns of animal, plant, and microbial diversity. Introductory consideration of the interaction between organisms with their environments provides a foundation for the intermediate level module Ecological Adaptation and Conservation Management. The course is primarily lecture-based but a number of tutorials are included to reflect on and provide supplementary information for the lecture course. A short oceanography-themed laboratory series also features on the module. This module can be taken independently of other foundation-level geography modules, but the oceanography-themed laboratory classes provide a complement to the analytical work performed for the module Global Earth Cycles.

Sustainability

This module introduces you to the theories and concepts underpinning sustainability. Sustainability is one of the major themes in contemporary human geography. Definitions vary depending on your discipline but ultimately centre on ensuring that our activities are undertaken without compromising future generation’s ability to live using the same resources.

Research Skills

Research in science ranges from finding out what is already known to carrying out investigations to add to our store of knowledge. This module provides the requisite background skills for successful completion of an honours degree in geographical sciences. Basic generic skills involving literacy, numeracy and use of IT are applied to summarizing, understanding, interpreting and presenting data generated by field and laboratory investigations. Throughout the module emphasis is on learning the skills that will be used in various parts of the degree programme. Acquisition of learning skills takes precedence over memorizing facts. Learning about current topics in geography involves finding peer-reviewed research literature (using library facilities and database searches), the application of qualitative and quantitative research methods, and summarizing findings with source attribution in reports or other forms of communication, and using correct scientific style. Basic statistics is taught using spreadsheet and statistics programs. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) provide frameworks for gathering, managing, and analysing data. You'll also have the opportunity to build up a portfolio of evidence relating to your skills for Personal Development Planning.

Analytical Science 1

This module aims to introduce students from diverse backgrounds to the range of skills required in modern analytical science and illustrate how analytical methodology underpins scientific investigation across the conventional discipline boundaries. The module will build on and develop your prior knowledge of analysis whilst not assuming any particular area of expertise and will also endeavour to improve your numerical, IT and communication skills by illustrating analytical methodology in the context of these key skill areas. This module also aims to develop your ability to obtain and interpret a wide range of spectroscopic data in a systematic and logical fashion. In this way you'll be taught to apply your knowledge to a wide range of new problems and in so doing develop your general problem solving skills. The module will be taught primarily by lectures and tutorials with illustrative practical work to highlight salient points from the lecture material.

Field course(Compulsory)

Option modules:

Choose two from a list which may include-

Earth Processes

This introductory course in physical geography examines the physical structure and landforms of the Earth. The processes driving geological and geomorphological developments will be examined. Plate tectonics created the massive structures, which have subsequently been sculpted by erosional forces (wind, water, ice and waves) to create the contemporary topography our society inhabits. Volcanoes and earthquakes alter the Earth's surface as well as presenting hazards to human society. Different geological materials have different physical and chemical properties and have much to tell us about the history of our planet. The module will also introduce you to the study of surface processes, whereby wind, water, rock and sediment interact to create the topography on which many of the World’s major cities are located. Different sedimentary environments will be covered, creating a firm foundation for the further study of geomorphology in the second year.

Climate, Meteorology and Atmospheric Systems

This course introduces you to the fundamentals of climate and atmospheric science. Climatology covers changes in climate over variable periods of time, whilst the meteorology section of this module addresses variations in weather, both long-term and short. The course is primarily lecture based but a number of workshops/lab classes are included to collect and interpret weather data.

Global Earth Cycles

This module introduces you to the natural global processes that have shaped the world we live in. It will explore how the past and current environment has been influenced and the interaction between the biosphere and the geosphere. It will begin with the emergence of life on earth and how the generation of oxygen via photosynthesis transformed the terrestrial environment. The module will then progress to examine the classical nutrient cycles (C, N, S, P, Fe, I) and how human intervention has modified and accelerated them. The role of basic soil processes (CEC, hydraulic conductivity, alkalinity etc) in the retention and release of elements and how these impact plant, animal and human nutrition will also be explored. The module will particularly focus on the impacts of agriculture, industry and global climate change. The module has a strong practical component with a focus on fieldwork, data collection, analysis and reporting. The fieldwork element of this module will be delivered during scheduled class time.

Inorganic Chemistry 1

This module introduces you to the chemistry of the elements. Starting with the earliest known chemical events in the universe, this module discusses the elements, their origin, structure and properties before looking at the structure and bonding in and reactions of chemical compounds and encompasses a number of areas of (mostly) main group chemistry including, but not limited to, the constituents of the earth's crust and the chemistry of the atmosphere.

Organic Chemistry 1

This module teaches you to recognise a range of functional groups and to name systematically compounds that contain them. Structure and bonding in organic compounds are discussed, as are the concepts of the octet rule, orbital hybridisation, formal charge, bond polarisation and resonance. The importance of molecular geometry is introduced and the basic principles of molecular conformation and of stereochemistry are covered. In preparation for the chemistry to follow, an integrated treatment of the 'language of chemical change' is presented. The ideas of mechanism and reaction intermediates are met, together with the curly arrow symbolism which chemists use to represent the electron movement inherent in chemical reactions. In the second half of the module, the chemistry of the principal functional groups is considered, using the ideas developed earlier. The lecture programme is reinforced by regular tutorials in which problems are worked. Running parallel to the lecture programme is a continuously assessed practical course that introduces you to the basic techniques of preparative organic chemistry.

Entry requirements

BCCat A Level including a grade C in an accepted Science subject with a pass in Science Practical where applicable. (The accepted Science subjects are: Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Mathematics, Geology and Applied Sciences).

104 UCAS tariff points from a combination of Level 3 qualifications including a grade C in an accepted Science subject at A Level with a pass in Science Practical where applicable. (The accepted Science A Level subjects are: Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Mathematics, Geology and Applied Sciences).

DMM in BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma in Applied Science. Alternatively, a BTEC in Health and Social Care is acceptable but must be accompanied by another A Level at a min grade C.

  • Access to Higher Education Diploma with 45 Level 3 credits at Merit or above to include modules in relevant subjects. For example: Geography, Maths or Science.
  • 104 UCAS tariff points from International Baccalaureate qualifications, including an accepted Science subject at Higher Level grade 5.

If you do not have the appropriate qualifications for direct entry to this degree you may be able to apply to our Science Extended Degree (BCF0).

If your first language is not English, you will need to meet the minimum requirements of an English Language qualification. The minimum for IELTS is 6.0 overall with no element lower than 5.5, or equivalent will be considered acceptable. Read more about the University’s entry requirements for students outside of the UK on our Where are you from information pages.

Other suitable experience or qualifications will be considered. For further information please see the University's minimum entry requirements.

Placements


In the third year of this course, you’ll get the chance to step out of the classroom and into the real world on an optional placement year working for an organisation related to your areas of interest. This is when you’ll really be able to see your knowledge in action, pick up invaluable skills for your future career and boost your employability to help you hit the ground running after graduation.

You could stay to do your placement in the UK or experience a new culture and work abroad for one year. Where could this year take you?

Your career


By developing a clear conceptual understanding of core principles with hands-on experience of key techniques and approaches related to its practice, our Environmental and Analytical Science BSc(Hons) is designed to give you the skills sought by a range of graduate recruiters. These include communication/presentation fluency, team-working, fieldwork expertise, environmental, social and commercial awareness, IT literacy, report writing, data analysis and GIS, time management and investigative skills, among others.

Environmental and analytical science graduates typically progress into careers in:

  • Industry: environmental sampling and trace analysis
  • Research: environmental chemistry
  • Environmental Management: environmental monitoring, environmental impact officer
  • Planning: GIS analyst, policy advisor, land surveying
  • Regulatory bodies: DEFRA
  • Commercial Enterprises: management, data analysis
  • Development: NGOs, charities
  • Nature Conservation: biodiversity officer, planning ecologist

 

*Whilst this is a new course and therefore no graduate statistics for this specific course are available, 91% of undergraduate graduates from courses in the School of Applied Sciences at Huddersfield are in work and/or further study fifteen months after graduating (HESA Graduate Outcomes 17/18, UK domiciled graduates).

91% Graduates employed*

Student support

At the University of Huddersfield, you'll find support networks and services to help you get ahead in your studies and social life. Whether you study at undergraduate or postgraduate level, you'll soon discover that you're never far away from our dedicated staff and resources to help you to navigate through your personal student journey. Find out more about all our support services.

Important information

We will always try to deliver your course as described on this web page. However, sometimes we may have to make changes as set out below.

Changes to a course you have applied for

If we propose to make a major change to a course that you are holding an offer for, then we will tell you as soon as possible so that you can decide whether to withdraw your application prior to enrolment.

Changes to your course after you enrol as a student

We will always try to deliver your course and other services as described. However, sometimes we may have to make changes as set out below:

Changes to option modules

Where your course allows you to choose modules from a range of options, we will review these each year and change them to reflect the expertise of our staff, current trends in research and as a result of student feedback or demand for certain modules. We will always ensure that you have a range of options to choose from and we will let you know in good time the options available for you to choose for the following year.

Major changes

We will only make major changes to the core curriculum of a course or to our services if it is necessary for us to do so and provided such changes are reasonable. A major change in this context is a change that materially changes the services available to you; or the outcomes, or a significant part, of your course, such as the nature of the award or a substantial change to module content, teaching days (part time provision), classes, type of delivery or assessment of the core curriculum.

For example, it may be necessary to make a major change to reflect changes in the law or the requirements of the University’s regulators; to meet the latest requirements of a commissioning or accrediting body; to improve the quality of educational provision; in response to student, examiners’ or other course evaluators’ feedback; and/or to reflect academic or professional changes within subject areas. Major changes may also be necessary because of circumstances outside our reasonable control, such as a key member of staff leaving the University or being unable to teach, where they have a particular specialism that can’t be adequately covered by other members of staff; or due to damage or interruption to buildings, facilities or equipment.

Major changes would usually be made with effect from the next academic year, but this may not always be the case. We will notify you as soon as possible should we need to make a major change and will carry out suitable consultation with affected students. If you reasonably believe that the proposed change will cause you detriment or hardship we will, if appropriate, work with you to try to reduce the adverse effect on you or find an appropriate solution. Where an appropriate solution cannot be found and you contact us in writing before the change takes effect you can cancel your registration and withdraw from the University without liability to the University for future tuition fees. We will provide reasonable support to assist you with transferring to another university if you wish to do so.

Termination of course

In exceptional circumstances, we may, for reasons outside of our control, be forced to discontinue or suspend your course. Where this is the case, a formal exit strategy will be followed and we will notify you as soon as possible about what your options are, which may include transferring to a suitable replacement course for which you are qualified, being provided with individual teaching to complete the award for which you were registered, or claiming an interim award and exiting the University. If you do not wish to take up any of the options that are made available to you, then you can cancel your registration and withdraw from the course without liability to the University for future tuition fees and you will be entitled to a refund of all course fees paid to date. We will provide reasonable support to assist you with transferring to another university if you wish to do so.

When you enrol as a student of the University, your study and time with us will be governed by a framework of regulations, policies and procedures, which form the basis of your agreement with us. These include regulations regarding the assessment of your course, academic integrity, your conduct (including attendance) and disciplinary procedure, fees and finance and compliance with visa requirements (where relevant). It is important that you familiarise yourself with these as you will be asked to agree to abide by them when you join us as a student. You will find a guide to the key terms here, along with the Student Protection Plan, where you will also find links to the full text of each of the regulations, policies and procedures referred to.

The Office for Students (OfS) is the principal regulator for the University.

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